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January 22, 2009

Mrs Dino begins prison term for tax convictions

Thursday, January 22, 2009

Kent Hovind‘s wife, Jo Hovind, began her one year and one day prison sentence at Federal Correctional Institution, Marianna in Marianna, Florida. Three weeks ago her and her husband’s appeal was denied in federal court. Previously she was free pending the appeal.

Before their convictions the couple operated Creation Science Evangelism, which sold videos and offered speakers in support of creationism. Hovind, who calls himself “Dr. Dino”, received a Ph.D in “Christian education” from the unaccredited correspondence school Patriot Bible University.

Related news

Sources

  • “Our appeal was denied, and my wife, Jo Hovind, must report to prison on January 20th.”

Kent Hovind “Ricky Update”. Creation Science Evangelism, January 13, 2009


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

January 3, 2009

Criminal appeals denied for American Evangelists

Criminal appeals denied for American Evangelists

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Saturday, January 3, 2009

Kent Hovind’s Appeal for his and his wife, Jo’s, felony convictions was recently denied by Eleventh Circuit Court. The court found that the Hovinds’ appeal was “without merit.” Kent and Jo were convicted of 58 and 44 tax-related felonies respectively, obstruction and intimidation of federal officers, willful failure to collect and pay taxes, and structuring to avoid bank reporting requirements. Kent is a Pensacola young Earth creationist/Evangelist and operator of Dinosaur Adventure Land whose speaking engagements and merchandise earned US$5 million from 1999 to March 2004.

The Appeal looked at several issues and concluded that there was enough evidence to convict the Hovinds and that the government did not err. Among other issues, it ruled “Sufficient evidence establishes that Kent failed to collect or pay withholding taxes.” It cited that “Employees of Evangelism Enterprises, peers, and legal counsel testified that Kent disputed the authority of the Internal Revenue Service based on the separation of the church and state, debated the interpretation and application of the withholding requirements, and intentionally characterized Evangelism Enterprises as a ‘church’ and his employees as ‘missionaries’ to avoid tax obligations.”

The Appeals court also ruled that the Hovinds “challenge the validity of their convictions on the ground that the statute does not penalize transactions below $10,000,” but the court ruled “this interpretation does not comport with the language of the statute.” Furthermore, it found “that Kent intended to impede agents of the Revenue Service (IRS) in their efforts to investigate and prosecute Kent’s violations of the tax laws” by “fil[ing] complaints and sued agents of the Internal Revenue Service and instituted legal proceedings to circumvent the lawful seizure of his assets.” Lastly, it affirmed the forfeiture of substitute property when the original property was transferred or deposited with a third party.

On January 19, 2007 Kent was sentenced to ten years in prison and ordered to pay US$640,000 in owed funds to the IRS, pay prosecution’s court costs of $7,078, and serve three years parole once released. Whereas, in June 2007 Jo was sentenced to one year and one day in prison, but the judge released her pending appeal.

Related news

  • “”Dr Dino” gets 10 years in prison after failure to pay taxes” — Wikinews, January 19, 2007
  • “Evangelist Hovind found guilty for tax fraud” — Wikinews, November 4, 2006
  • “Evangelist Kent Hovind’s tax trial begins” — Wikinews, October 21, 2006
  • “Kent Hovind faces a 58-count federal indictment” — Wikinews, July 21, 2006

Sources

External links

Wikisource
Wikisource has original text related to this article:
Kent Hovind’s Eleventh Circuit Court Criminal Appeal
Wikisource
Wikisource has original text related to this article:
United States of America v Kent Hovind and Jo Hovind


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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

January 1, 2009

Evangelists’ criminal appeal denied

Thursday, January 1, 2009

Kent Hovind‘s Appeal for his and his wife, Jo’s, felony convictions was recently denied by Eleventh Circuit Court. The court found that the Hovinds’ appeal was “without merit.” Kent is a Pensacola young Earth creationist/Evangelist and operator of Dinosaur Adventure Land whose speaking engagements and merchandised earned $5 million USD from 1999 to March 2004.

The Appeal looked at several issues and concluded that there was enough evidence to convict the Hovinds and that the government did not err. Among other issues, it ruled “Sufficient evidence establishes that Kent failed to collect or pay withholding taxes.” It cited that “Employees of Evangelism Enterprises, peers, and legal counsel testified that Kent disputed the authority of the Internal Revenue Service based on the separation of the church and state, debated the interpretation and application of the withholding requirements, and intentionally characterized Evangelism Enterprises as a ‘church’ and his employees as ‘missionaries’ to avoid tax obligations.”

The Appeals court also ruled that the Hovinds “challenge the validity of their convictions on the ground that the statute does not penalize transactions below $10,000,” but the court ruled “this interpretation does not comport with the language of the statute.” Furthermore, it found “that Kent intended to impede agents of the Revenue Service (IRS) in their efforts to investigate and prosecute Kent’s violations of the tax laws” by “fil[ing] complaints and sued agents of the Internal Revenue Service and instituted legal proceedings to circumvent the lawful seizure of his assets.” Lastly, it affirmed the forfeiture of substitute property when the original property was transferred or deposited with a third party.

On January 19, 2007 Kent was sentenced to ten years in prison and ordered to pay US$640,000 in owed funds to the IRS, pay prosecution’s court costs of $7,078, and serve three years parole once released. Whereas, in June 2007 Jo was sentenced to one year and on day in prison, but the judge released her pending appeal.

Related news

  • “”Dr Dino” gets 10 years in prison after failure to pay taxes”. Wikinews, January 19, 2007
  • “Evangelist Hovind found guilty for tax fraud”. Wikinews, November 4, 2006
  • “Evangelist Kent Hovind’s tax trial begins”. Wikinews, October 21, 2006
  • “Kent Hovind faces a 58-count federal indictment”. Wikinews, July 21, 2006

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

External links

Wikisource
Wikisource has original text related to this article:
United States of America v Kent Hovind and Jo Hovind
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Evangelists’ criminal appeal denied

Thursday, January 1, 2009

Kent Hovind‘s Appeal for his and his wife, Jo’s, felony convictions was recently denied by Eleventh Circuit Court. The court found that the Hovinds’ appeal was “without merit.” Kent is a Pensacola young Earth creationist/Evangelist and operator of Dinosaur Adventure Land whose speaking engagements and merchandised earned $5 million USD from 1999 to March 2004.

The Appeal looked at several issues and concluded that there was enough evidence to convict the Hovinds and that the government did not err. Among other issues, it ruled “Sufficient evidence establishes that Kent failed to collect or pay withholding taxes.” It cited that “Employees of Evangelism Enterprises, peers, and legal counsel testified that Kent disputed the authority of the Internal Revenue Service based on the separation of the church and state, debated the interpretation and application of the withholding requirements, and intentionally characterized Evangelism Enterprises as a ‘church’ and his employees as ‘missionaries’ to avoid tax obligations.”

The Appeals court also ruled that the Hovinds “challenge the validity of their convictions on the ground that the statute does not penalize transactions below $10,000,” but the court ruled “this interpretation does not comport with the language of the statute.” Furthermore, it found “that Kent intended to impede agents of the Revenue Service (IRS) in their efforts to investigate and prosecute Kent’s violations of the tax laws” by “fil[ing] complaints and sued agents of the Internal Revenue Service and instituted legal proceedings to circumvent the lawful seizure of his assets.” Lastly, it affirmed the forfeiture of substitute property when the original property was transferred or deposited with a third party.

On January 19, 2007 Kent was sentenced to ten years in prison and ordered to pay US$640,000 in owed funds to the IRS, pay prosecution’s court costs of $7,078, and serve three years parole once released. Whereas, in June 2007 Jo was sentenced to one year and on day in prison, but the judge released her pending appeal.

Related news

  • “”Dr Dino” gets 10 years in prison after failure to pay taxes”. Wikinews, January 19, 2007
  • “Evangelist Hovind found guilty for tax fraud”. Wikinews, November 4, 2006
  • “Evangelist Kent Hovind’s tax trial begins”. Wikinews, October 21, 2006
  • “Kent Hovind faces a 58-count federal indictment”. Wikinews, July 21, 2006

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

External links

Wikisource
Wikisource has original text related to this article:
United States of America v Kent Hovind and Jo Hovind
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Evangelists’ criminal appeal denied

Thursday, January 1, 2009

Kent Hovind‘s Appeal for his and his wife, Jo’s, felony convictions was recently denied by Eleventh Circuit Court. The court found that the Hovinds’ appeal was “without merit.” Kent is a Pensacola young Earth creationist/Evangelist and operator of Dinosaur Adventure Land whose speaking engagements and merchandised earned $5 million USD from 1999 to March 2004.

The Appeal looked at several issues and concluded that there was enough evidence to convict the Hovinds and that the government did not err. Among other issues, it ruled “Sufficient evidence establishes that Kent failed to collect or pay withholding taxes.” It cited that “Employees of Evangelism Enterprises, peers, and legal counsel testified that Kent disputed the authority of the Internal Revenue Service based on the separation of the church and state, debated the interpretation and application of the withholding requirements, and intentionally characterized Evangelism Enterprises as a ‘church’ and his employees as ‘missionaries’ to avoid tax obligations.”

The Appeals court also ruled that the Hovinds “challenge the validity of their convictions on the ground that the statute does not penalize transactions below $10,000,” but the court ruled “this interpretation does not comport with the language of the statute.” Furthermore, it found “that Kent intended to impede agents of the Revenue Service (IRS) in their efforts to investigate and prosecute Kent’s violations of the tax laws” by “fil[ing] complaints and sued agents of the Internal Revenue Service and instituted legal proceedings to circumvent the lawful seizure of his assets.” Lastly, it affirmed the forfeiture of substitute property when the original property was transferred or deposited with a third party.

On January 19, 2007 Kent was sentenced to ten years in prison and ordered to pay US$640,000 in owed funds to the IRS, pay prosecution’s court costs of $7,078, and serve three years parole once released. Whereas, in June 2007 Jo was sentenced to one year and on day in prison, but the judge released her pending appeal.

Related news

  • “”Dr Dino” gets 10 years in prison after failure to pay taxes”. Wikinews, January 19, 2007
  • “Evangelist Hovind found guilty for tax fraud”. Wikinews, November 4, 2006
  • “Evangelist Kent Hovind’s tax trial begins”. Wikinews, October 21, 2006
  • “Kent Hovind faces a 58-count federal indictment”. Wikinews, July 21, 2006

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

External links

Wikisource
Wikisource has original text related to this article:
United States of America v Kent Hovind and Jo Hovind
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Evangelists’ criminal appeal denied

Thursday, January 1, 2009

Kent Hovind‘s Appeal for his and his wife, Jo’s, felony convictions was recently denied by Eleventh Circuit Court. The court found that the Hovinds’ appeal was “without merit.” Kent is a Pensacola young Earth creationist/Evangelist and operator of Dinosaur Adventure Land whose speaking engagements and merchandised earned $5 million USD from 1999 to March 2004.

The Appeal looked at several issues and concluded that there was enough evidence to convict the Hovinds and that the government did not err. Among other issues, it ruled “Sufficient evidence establishes that Kent failed to collect or pay withholding taxes.” It cited that “Employees of Evangelism Enterprises, peers, and legal counsel testified that Kent disputed the authority of the Internal Revenue Service based on the separation of the church and state, debated the interpretation and application of the withholding requirements, and intentionally characterized Evangelism Enterprises as a ‘church’ and his employees as ‘missionaries’ to avoid tax obligations.”

The Appeals court also ruled that the Hovinds “challenge the validity of their convictions on the ground that the statute does not penalize transactions below $10,000,” but the court ruled “this interpretation does not comport with the language of the statute.” Furthermore, it found “that Kent intended to impede agents of the Revenue Service (IRS) in their efforts to investigate and prosecute Kent’s violations of the tax laws” by “fil[ing] complaints and sued agents of the Internal Revenue Service and instituted legal proceedings to circumvent the lawful seizure of his assets.” Lastly, it affirmed the forfeiture of substitute property when the original property was transferred or deposited with a third party.

On January 19, 2007 Kent was sentenced to ten years in prison and ordered to pay US$640,000 in owed funds to the IRS, pay prosecution’s court costs of $7,078, and serve three years parole once released. Whereas, in June 2007 Jo was sentenced to one year and on day in prison, but the judge released her pending appeal.

Related news

  • “”Dr Dino” gets 10 years in prison after failure to pay taxes”. Wikinews, January 19, 2007
  • “Evangelist Hovind found guilty for tax fraud”. Wikinews, November 4, 2006
  • “Evangelist Kent Hovind’s tax trial begins”. Wikinews, October 21, 2006
  • “Kent Hovind faces a 58-count federal indictment”. Wikinews, July 21, 2006

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

External links

Wikisource
Wikisource has original text related to this article:
United States of America v Kent Hovind and Jo Hovind
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Evangelists’ criminal appeal denied

Thursday, January 1, 2009

Kent Hovind‘s Appeal for his and his wife, Jo’s, felony convictions was recently denied by Eleventh Circuit Court. The court found that the Hovinds’ appeal was “without merit.” Kent is a Pensacola young Earth creationist/Evangelist and operator of Dinosaur Adventure Land whose speaking engagements and merchandised earned $5 million USD from 1999 to March 2004.

The Appeal looked at several issues and concluded that there was enough evidence to convict the Hovinds and that the government did not err. Among other issues, it ruled “Sufficient evidence establishes that Kent failed to collect or pay withholding taxes.” It cited that “Employees of Evangelism Enterprises, peers, and legal counsel testified that Kent disputed the authority of the Internal Revenue Service based on the separation of the church and state, debated the interpretation and application of the withholding requirements, and intentionally characterized Evangelism Enterprises as a ‘church’ and his employees as ‘missionaries’ to avoid tax obligations.”

The Appeals court also ruled that the Hovinds “challenge the validity of their convictions on the ground that the statute does not penalize transactions below $10,000,” but the court ruled “this interpretation does not comport with the language of the statute.” Furthermore, it found “that Kent intended to impede agents of the Revenue Service (IRS) in their efforts to investigate and prosecute Kent’s violations of the tax laws” by “fil[ing] complaints and sued agents of the Internal Revenue Service and instituted legal proceedings to circumvent the lawful seizure of his assets.” Lastly, it affirmed the forfeiture of substitute property when the original property was transferred or deposited with a third party.

On January 19, 2007 Kent was sentenced to ten years in prison and ordered to pay US$640,000 in owed funds to the IRS, pay prosecution’s court costs of $7,078, and serve three years parole once released. Whereas, in June 2007 Jo was sentenced to one year and on day in prison, but the judge released her pending appeal.

Related news

  • “”Dr Dino” gets 10 years in prison after failure to pay taxes”. Wikinews, January 19, 2007
  • “Evangelist Hovind found guilty for tax fraud”. Wikinews, November 4, 2006
  • “Evangelist Kent Hovind’s tax trial begins”. Wikinews, October 21, 2006
  • “Kent Hovind faces a 58-count federal indictment”. Wikinews, July 21, 2006

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

External links

Wikisource
Wikisource has original text related to this article:
United States of America v Kent Hovind and Jo Hovind
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Evangelists’ criminal appeal denied

Thursday, January 1, 2009

Kent Hovind‘s Appeal for his and his wife, Jo’s, felony convictions was recently denied by Eleventh Circuit Court. The court found that the Hovinds’ appeal was “without merit.” Kent is a Pensacola young Earth creationist/Evangelist and operator of Dinosaur Adventure Land whose speaking engagements and merchandised earned $5 million USD from 1999 to March 2004.

The Appeal looked at several issues and concluded that there was enough evidence to convict the Hovinds and that the government did not err. Among other issues, it ruled “Sufficient evidence establishes that Kent failed to collect or pay withholding taxes.” It cited that “Employees of Evangelism Enterprises, peers, and legal counsel testified that Kent disputed the authority of the Internal Revenue Service based on the separation of the church and state, debated the interpretation and application of the withholding requirements, and intentionally characterized Evangelism Enterprises as a ‘church’ and his employees as ‘missionaries’ to avoid tax obligations.”

The Appeals court also ruled that the Hovinds “challenge the validity of their convictions on the ground that the statute does not penalize transactions below $10,000,” but the court ruled “this interpretation does not comport with the language of the statute.” Furthermore, it found “that Kent intended to impede agents of the Revenue Service (IRS) in their efforts to investigate and prosecute Kent’s violations of the tax laws” by “fil[ing] complaints and sued agents of the Internal Revenue Service and instituted legal proceedings to circumvent the lawful seizure of his assets.” Lastly, it affirmed the forfeiture of substitute property when the original property was transferred or deposited with a third party.

On January 19, 2007 Kent was sentenced to ten years in prison and ordered to pay US$640,000 in owed funds to the IRS, pay prosecution’s court costs of $7,078, and serve three years parole once released. Whereas, in June 2007 Jo was sentenced to one year and on day in prison, but the judge released her pending appeal.

Related news

  • “”Dr Dino” gets 10 years in prison after failure to pay taxes”. Wikinews, January 19, 2007
  • “Evangelist Hovind found guilty for tax fraud”. Wikinews, November 4, 2006
  • “Evangelist Kent Hovind’s tax trial begins”. Wikinews, October 21, 2006
  • “Kent Hovind faces a 58-count federal indictment”. Wikinews, July 21, 2006

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

External links

Wikisource
Wikisource has original text related to this article:
United States of America v Kent Hovind and Jo Hovind
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Evangelists’ criminal appeal denied

Thursday, January 1, 2009

Kent Hovind‘s Appeal for his and his wife, Jo’s, felony convictions was recently denied by Eleventh Circuit Court. The court found that the Hovinds’ appeal was “without merit.” Kent is a Pensacola young Earth creationist/Evangelist and operator of Dinosaur Adventure Land whose speaking engagements and merchandised earned $5 million USD from 1999 to March 2004.

The Appeal looked at several issues and concluded that there was enough evidence to convict the Hovinds and that the government did not err. Among other issues, it ruled “Sufficient evidence establishes that Kent failed to collect or pay withholding taxes.” It cited that “Employees of Evangelism Enterprises, peers, and legal counsel testified that Kent disputed the authority of the Internal Revenue Service based on the separation of the church and state, debated the interpretation and application of the withholding requirements, and intentionally characterized Evangelism Enterprises as a ‘church’ and his employees as ‘missionaries’ to avoid tax obligations.”

The Appeals court also ruled that the Hovinds “challenge the validity of their convictions on the ground that the statute does not penalize transactions below $10,000,” but the court ruled “this interpretation does not comport with the language of the statute.” Furthermore, it found “that Kent intended to impede agents of the Revenue Service (IRS) in their efforts to investigate and prosecute Kent’s violations of the tax laws” by “fil[ing] complaints and sued agents of the Internal Revenue Service and instituted legal proceedings to circumvent the lawful seizure of his assets.” Lastly, it affirmed the forfeiture of substitute property when the original property was transferred or deposited with a third party.

On January 19, 2007 Kent was sentenced to ten years in prison and ordered to pay US$640,000 in owed funds to the IRS, pay prosecution’s court costs of $7,078, and serve three years parole once released. Whereas, in June 2007 Jo was sentenced to one year and on day in prison, but the judge released her pending appeal.

Related news

  • “”Dr Dino” gets 10 years in prison after failure to pay taxes”. Wikinews, January 19, 2007
  • “Evangelist Hovind found guilty for tax fraud”. Wikinews, November 4, 2006
  • “Evangelist Kent Hovind’s tax trial begins”. Wikinews, October 21, 2006
  • “Kent Hovind faces a 58-count federal indictment”. Wikinews, July 21, 2006

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

External links

Wikisource
Wikisource has original text related to this article:
United States of America v Kent Hovind and Jo Hovind
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

October 2, 2007

Senator David Vitter to earmark $100,000 for creationist group

Senator David Vitter to earmark $100,000 for creationist group

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Tuesday, October 2, 2007

David Vitter

David Vitter, a Republican United States Senator from Louisiana, has earmarked US$100,000 for Louisiana Family Forum (LFF), a conservative creationist organization. Vitter put the earmark into the labor, health and education financing bill for fiscal year 2008. The bill specifies the Louisiana Family Forum received the money “to develop a plan to promote better science education.”

Vitter has close ties to the LFF through Dan Richey, a former politician and the group’s grass-roots coordinator, who received $17,250 as a consultant in Vitter’s 2004 Senate race. Also Vitter’s campaign paid Beryl Amedee who is the education resource council chairwoman for the Louisiana Family Forum.

As part of the Louisiana Family Forum efforts to “combat” the teaching of evolution, the group included Kent Hovind’s “Battle Plan” on its website. Hovind, whose education from the non-accredited Patriot Bible University is widely considered to be a diploma mill, is currently serving a ten year prison sentence for tax evasion and obstructing federal agents.

In a written statement Vitter explained, “This program helps supplement and support educators and school systems that would like to offer all of the explanations in the study of controversial science topics such as global warming and the life sciences.” However, reporter James Gill poked fun at Vitter’s admission of using the services of Pamela Martin and Associates, a prostitution service ran by Deborah Jeane Palfrey, and his recent creationist earmark. “We were better off when Vitter, in between homilies on the sanctity of marriage, was blowing his own money on prostitutes. At least the kids were safe,” Gill wrote. He continued, “They will not be if the Louisiana Family Forum gets its way.”



Sources

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
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