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May 8, 2014

Student protesters take over Q&A

Student protesters take over Q&A – Wikinews, the free news source

Student protesters take over Q&A

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Thursday, May 8, 2014

The broadcast of popular Australian TV show Q&A was interrupted on Monday night by a student protest targeting Australian Education Minister Christopher Pyne.

The protest was in response to proposals from the Commission of Audit for the May 13 budget suggesting the deregulation of university education.

Christopher Pyne.
Image: David Foote.

Christopher Pyne had been the focus of many questions on the panel before the protest. One question initially directed at Pyne from the audience was given to former parliamentary speaker Anna Burke to discuss first. When she started to answer, students unfurled a banner behind her reading “More brains, not warplanes — Fund education”. This was accompanied by rhyming slogans shouted from the crowd of students including the phrase: “No cuts. No fees. No corporate universities.”

Unable to quell the protesters, the ABC briefly cut the program to air a musical segment from a previous show, while removing the protesters from the building. Upon return to the broadcast, about two minutes later, the host Tony Jones apologised for the incident: “Apologies to the minister, apologies to everyone on the panel, apologies to the wider audience watching[…] This is not what we want to happen on the program, that is not what democracy is all about and those students should understand that.”

Social media responded to the demonstration immediately, with mixed reactions about the incident itself and Jones’ handling of it. Education writer Maralyn Parker remarked on Twitter, “The riot on #qanda is indicative of how deeply Australians feel about the destruction of education the Abbott Govt is inflicting on us”.

The commission proposed to raise tuition costs by 14% and require repayment of the HECS loan starting at minimum wage, A$32,354, according to Gwilym Croucher of the University of Melbourne. The commission also proposed to reduce Commonwealth subsidies down to 45%.



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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 4, 2006

Rudd replaces Beazley as Australian opposition leader

Rudd replaces Beazley as Australian opposition leader

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Monday, December 4, 2006

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Kevin Rudd is new leader of the Australian opposition party

Kevin Rudd has been elected as leader of the Labor party by the party’s caucus. His running-mate Julia Gillard was elected unopposed to the deputy leadership.

The vote was called on Friday after Kevin Rudd challenged former leader Kim Beazley for the leadership. Rudd won the leadership by a vote of 49-39.

Rudd becomes the party’s third leader since the 2004 election, where the Howard government won a fourth consecutive term in government.

Long-serving deputy leader Jenny Macklin did not contest the deputy leadership following the defeat of Mr Beazley. Mrs Macklin has been deputy leader under three leaders since 2001.

The party will elect its shadow ministry in a separate ballot on Thursday.

Premier of Queensland Peter Beattie has said that the leadership change “will herald in a new period of stability for the party.”

“It’s important that if you have good policy and good government, it’s important you also have stability in leadership,” said Beattie. “I’d urge everyone to get behind Kevin – having a Queenslander as the alternative prime minister is good for the state and good for Australia.”

Labor MP Dick Adams said even though he voted for Beazley to remain as leader, he supports the party’s new leadership. “There’ll be a lot more harmony and a lot more opportunity of ideas,” he said. “I think the new ideas need to flow and I think if it’s opened up, as some people have said, they want those ideas to come forward, but I think we’ll have some interesting policy direction to take to the people.”

Sharan Burrow, the president of the ACTU – the peak union body in Australia said Mr Rudd will be a strong leader. “I have no doubt that Kevin Rudd will say that these laws have to go, that they will be replaced by a policy that reinstates rights,” Ms Burrow has told Sky News.

Government MP, Christopher Pyne said that the new leadership was a poor choice for the party. “The combination of Kevin Rudd and Julia Gillard will have all the hallmarks of the mongoose and the cobra. It shows Labor is obsessed about leadership rather than policy and strategy,” Mr Pyne said.

In a poll released by Newspoll today, a Rudd-Gillard leadership team had 48 percent support of the public, compared to the outgoing Beazley-Macklin team’s 27 percent.

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

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