Wiki Actu en

August 3, 2011

Russian geographer Andrey Kapitsa dies aged 80

Russian geographer Andrey Kapitsa dies aged 80

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, August 3, 2011

Russia
Related stories
Location of Russia

A map showing the location of Russia

More information on Russia:
  • Russia
  • Culture
  • Demographics
  • Economy
  • Geography
  • History
  • Politics

Satellite image of Lake Vostok

Andrey Kapitsa, the Russian geographer best known for his part in the discovery of Lake Vostok in Antarctica, has died in Moscow at the age of 80. He participated in four Soviet expeditions to the South Pole during his career.

Kapitsa was born to Physics Nobel Prize laureate Pyotr Leonidovich Kapitsa in Cambridge, England in 1931. He graduated from the Moscow State University‘s Faculty of Geography in 1953, and took part in the first of his four expeditions to the South Pole two years later. In 1967, he led the U.S.S.R. Academy of Sciences on a two year expedition through eastern Africa.

Along with other scientists, Kapitsa is credited with the discovery of Lake Vostok in eastern Antarctica. Lake Vostok, named after the polar research station, lies four kilometres below the ice and is around 15.5 thousand km². It is believed that the lake is home to ancient organisms, which have evolved over time.

Kapitsa’s body will lie in state on August 4 in the foyer of the Moscow State University’s Community Centre.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 17, 2009

Yegor Gaidar, Russian economist and politician, dies at 53

Yegor Gaidar, Russian economist and politician, dies at 53

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, December 17, 2009

Yegor Gaidar
Image: Slobodinskij Sergej Dmitrijevitj.

Russian liberal economist and politician Yegor Gaidar died on Wednesday at the age of 53. He was the son of the famous Russian journalist Timur Gaidar.

Born in Moscow in 1956, he graduated in economics from Moscow State University in 1978. In January 1992 in the position of Russia’s first finance minister he dropped state control over prices, making Russia a capitalist country with a market economy. While working as an acting Prime Minister of Russia, Gaidar provided the so-called “shock therapy” treatment of the Russian economy, a set of liberal economic reforms.

His health was declining after he was allegedly poisoned in Ireland in 2006, collapsing soon after eating breakfast. This episode led to comparisons to Alexander Litvenenko, killed with radioactive polonium in November 2006.

Yegor Gaidar died of a blood clot at his home in the Moscow region. He is survived by his wife, three sons and daughter. His funeral is scheduled to take place on Saturday, the burial place is yet to be decided.



Sources

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject:
Yegor Gaidar
Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

November 10, 2009

Vitaly Ginzburg, Russian academician and physicist, dies at age 94

Vitaly Ginzburg, Russian academician and physicist, dies at age 94

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Tuesday, November 10, 2009

Nobel Prize winner, prominent Russian Academician of the Russian Academy of Sciences and theoretical physicist Vitaly Ginzburg has died on Sunday at the age of 93 years.

Ginzburg reads his Nobel lecture in MSU (2004)
Image: Emaus.

Ginzburg was one of the fathers of the Soviet hydrogen bomb together with Andrei Sakharov, and the head of the Department of Theoretical Physics in the Lebedev Physical Institute of Academy of Sciences (FIAN), as well as editor-in-chief of the scientific journal UFN.

He was born in Moscow in 1916, and graduated from the Physics Faculty of Moscow State University in 1938.

In 2003 he shared the Nobel Prize in Physics together with Alexei Abrikosov and Anthony Leggett for developing the theory behind superconductivity.

He developed a theory based on Lev Landau’s previously-established theory of second-order phase transitions, about the free energy of a superconductor near the superconducting transition which describes how deep into the superconducting phase the system is. He also developed the theory of electromagnetic wave propagation in plasma and a theory of cosmic radiation. He was usually touted as the “last theorist” in Russia.

He was granted the USSR State Prize in 1953 and the Lenin Prize in 1966.

Ginzburg died from heart failure. A civil funeral will be held on Wednesday at the main hall of FIAN. He will be buried on November 11 in the Novodevichy Cemetery in Moscow.

In a TV interview, Ginzburg once said: “If I believed in God, I would start every morning by saying, ‘Thank you, My Lord, for making me a theoretical physicist.'” But he was an atheist.

One of his favorite sayings was: “Of course, it could be funny, if it wouldn’t be so sad”…



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Powered by WordPress