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December 26, 2006

Saddam Hussein to be hanged in 30 days

Saddam Hussein to be hanged in 30 days – Wikinews, the free news source

Saddam Hussein to be hanged in 30 days

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Tuesday, December 26, 2006

National security adviser for Iraq, Mouwafak al-Rubaie, has confirmed that Saddam Hussein is to be executed within 30 days of losing his appeal at the High Tribunal Court. Mr. al-Rubaie said: “The appeals court approved the verdict to hang Saddam.” Following the announcement, approximately 20 people were killed and 12 people injured in Baghdad, in a bomb explosion and a mortar attack.

The decision requires ratification by the Iraqi president, Jalal Talabani who personally opposes the death penalty. However President Talabani has given legal permission for one of Iraq’s two vice-presidents to sign death orders.

Mr. Hussein was first sentenced to death on November 5 when he was convicted of murdering 148 Shi’ite’s in Shi’ite village, Dujail, following an assassination attempt. Mr. Hussein claims that those killed were found guilty in an Iraq court of law. Others who were involved will also be hanged, those people include Mr. Hussein’s half-brother and chief of intelligence, Barzan Ibrahim and head of the Revolutionary Court in Iraq who issued the death orders against the Shi’ites, Awad Hamed al-Bander. Taha Yassin Ramadan, former vice-president of Iraq, had been given life imprisonment but an appeals court found that was lenient and have asked the High Tribunal Court to give Mr. Ramadan the death sentence.

Scott Stanzel, spokesman for the White House, said that the decision was an “important milestone in the Iraqi people’s efforts to replace the rule of a tyrant with the rule of law. The Iraqis deserve praise for continuing to utilise the institutions of democracy to pursue justice. Saddam Hussein has received due process and legal rights that he denied the Iraqi people for so long, so this is an important day for the Iraqi people.”

Raed Juhi, spokesman for the High Tribunal Court, said: “The Iraqi judicial system would ensure that Saddam is executed even if Talabani and the two vice presidents do not ratify the decision. We’ll implement the verdict by the power of the law.”

In December 2003, Mr. Hussein was found hiding in a hole north of Baghdad with a pistol which hadn’t been fired.

During the trial, which was televised all throughout Iraq and the Middle East, Mr. Hussein was kicked out of the courtroom for repeatedly giving harangues. The others also given the death sentence showed up during the trial with only underwear on and sat with their backs to the judges. Also during the trial, three lawyers acting on behalf of the defense and one witness were murdered.

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November 5, 2006

Saddam Hussein sentenced to death for Dujail killings

Saddam Hussein sentenced to death for Dujail killings

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Sunday, November 5, 2006

The Iraq Special Tribunal has finally sentenced the deposed Iraqi President Saddam Hussein to death by hanging over the killings of 148 villagers in the town of Dujail in 1982.

Hussein was charged with crimes against humanity for ordering the killings after a failed assassination attempt was made on him in the mostly Shiite town.

Of his seven co-defendants in the trial, the former head of the Iraqi secret police, Hussein’s half-brother Barzan al-Tikriti and the former chief judge of the Revolutionary Court, Awad Hamed al-Bandar were also sentenced to death. Former vice-president Taha Yassin Ramadan was sentenced to life in prison, three other officials received 15 years in prison and one was acquitted.

File:TrialSaddam.jpg

File photo of Saddam Hussein appearing before the Tribunal on July 1, 2004
(Image missing from commons: image; log)

Proceedings

The five-member Special Tribunal was authorised by the Iraqi Interim Government to try Iraqi nationals or residents accused of genocide, crimes against humanity, war crimes or other serious crimes committed during the Ba’ath party rule between 1968 and 2003.

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The Trial of Saddam Hussein

During today’s hearing, Judge Rauf Rasheed Abdel Rahman ordered bailiffs to force Saddam, who was shouting out protests, to stand as the verdict was read out.

Hussein was reported as appearing shaken as the verdict was pronounced, and later shouted “Allahu Akbar!” (God is greatest) and “Long live the nation!”.

The sentences of death and life in prison carry an automatic appeal, and no time-limit is set for the appeals court review of the case. The law mandates the death sentence to be carried out within 30 days, after all appeals are exhausted.

Former U.S. Attorney General Ramsey Clark, who is a defence attorney in the case, was ordered out of the court by the judges, who said that he had come to mock the Iraqi people and the court. Clarke had described the court yesterday as prejudiced and lacking impartiality, and called attention to the killings of Hussein’s defence lawyers and the removal of judges from the tribunal.

Reactions

In Iraq

Ali al-Dabbagh, a spokesman for the Iraqi coalition government said the verdict was as expected, adding “This is the least that Saddam deserved because his crimes were great. No further punishment was possible.”

Deputy Prime Minister Barham Salih called the court “just and professional” and said that Saddam was “given the justice he denied to the people of Iraq over 35 years”.

A Sunni member of parliament, speaking under anonymity to Reuters, however called the judgement “a political verdict from a political court.”

Popular reaction

The verdict was announced amidst increased security measures in Iraq, including curfews in Baghdad and other cities. Despite the curfew, around a thousand people were reported as coming out into the streets of the Shiite-dominated Sadr City in celebration and gunfire was heard in Baghdad.

Celebrations were also reported in Dujail, where the killings took place.

Despite the curfew, about a thousand people demonstrated in Tikrit carrying pictures of Saddam Hussein. Some Sunnis were reported as denouncing the verdict as a “product of the US occupation forces”.

Fighting is reported to have broken out in Adhimiyah, a Sunni district of Baghdad, within half an hour of the verdict. There was heavy firing and mortar shells landed near the Abu Hanifa mosque.

International reactions

The U.S. Ambassador to Iraq, Zalmay Khalilzad said the verdict was “an important milestone for Iraq”.

The U.K. Foreign Secretary Margaret Beckett welcomed the trial’s conclusion, saying it was “right” that Saddam and the other accused have to face Iraqi justice, and that they have been “held to account for their crimes”.

Malcolm Smart, the Middle East and North Africa Director for Amnesty International said that the tribunal’s proceedings failed to meet necessary standards for a fair trial.

Hussein’s verdict was delivered during highly contested midterm elections in United States; where the party most insistent upon an American occupation of Iraq (Republican – GOP) lagged in polls due to domestic controversies.

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

July 27, 2006

Saddam Hussein to learn his fate in October

Saddam Hussein to learn his fate in October

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Thursday, July 27, 2006

File:TrialSaddam.jpg
This picture shows Saddam Hussein during his first appearance at the Iraqi Special Tribunal. He was the president of Iraq from 1979 until the United States-led invasion of Iraq reached Baghdad on April 9, 2003.

The trial of Saddam Hussein has been adjourned until 16 October, which is when the Iraq Special Tribunal is expected to pronounce its judgment.

Hussein and seven co-defendants are on trial charged with crimes against humanity after Hussein allegedly ordered his military forces to kill 148 people from the village of Dujail following an attempted assassination of the former Iraqi leader in 1982.

Prosecutors at the trial want the death penalty for Hussein and two co-defendants. At a hearing yesterday, Hussein said that if he was found guilty and condemned to die, he would prefer to be shot rather than hanged. He also claimed that he had been taken to court against his will.

The former dictator did not appear in court for the final session of his trial today, but he is due to stand trial on 21 August to judge his part in the infamous Anfal campaign, where groups of Iraqi Kurds were murdered in the 1980s.

As Hussein’s defense team has been boycotting the trial demanding better security after three of their numbers were murdered, the court has selected replacement lawyers. Iraq’s former Vice-President Taha Yassin Ramadan, today refused to allow the appointed representative to stand for him. “I do not know who this lawyer is or his name,” he said. The other defendant was Awad Hamad al-Bandar, the former chief judge of the court.

Like he did yesterday, Judge Raouf Abdel Rahman again slated Hussein’s defense lawyers for avoiding the court. “They’re sitting abroad now generating fame by issuing political statements on television stations as if this case is a political one. This behavior will harm you, the defendants. This is a criminal case, not a political one,” Mr Rahman warned. Most of Hussein’s legal team is based in Amman, the capital of Jordan.

His trial started in Baghdad on 19 October 2005.

Related news

  • “Saddam Hussein ‘forced’ back to trial” — Wikinews, July 26, 2006

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

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