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June 2, 2011

Atlanta Thrashers sold to True North Sports and Entertainment, moving to Winnipeg

Atlanta Thrashers sold to True North Sports and Entertainment, moving to Winnipeg

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Thursday, June 2, 2011

Fifteen years after the Winnipeg Jets left the province of Manitoba, Canada, an announcement on Tuesday made official what ice hockey fans have been anticipating: The National Hockey League‘s (NHL) Atlanta Thrashers are moving to Winnipeg. The Thrashers, who have been a target for relocation rumors amid the ownership struggles and financial losses, will leave Atlanta after eleven seasons there in the highest-level professional ice hockey league in North America. The deal, which was finalized early in the morning Tuesday, has just one step to climb: a vote by the NHL’s Board of Governors, which will take up the matter at their June 21 meeting.

The MTS Centre will serve as the home arena for the new Winnipeg team.
Image: Wpg guy.

Atlanta Spirit Group, LLC. (ASG), who owned the Thrashers—and continues to own both the Atlanta Hawks of the National Basketball Association, as well as Philips Arena, the arena both teams occupied—completed the sale to Winnipeg investor group True North Sports & Entertainment Ltd. The Thrashers will move into their new home arena, MTS Centre in Winnipeg. ASG has also been trying to find buyers for the Atlanta Hawks as well as Philips Arena. NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman, who also presided over the league when the Jets left Winnipeg in 1996, has stated the Thrashers will remain in the Southeast Division for at least the 2011-12 season, after which time the NHL is expected to shuffle teams between the Western and Eastern conferences to move the Thrashers to the West, to play with other teams in western North America. The two teams situated in the Western Conference which reside in the Eastern Time Zone, the Detroit Red Wings and Columbus Blue Jackets, as well as the Nashville Predators are considered favorites to be moved into the Eastern Conference when this happens.

The city of Winnipeg, which has been ready and waiting for an NHL franchise since the Jets relocated to Glendale, Arizona and became the Phoenix Coyotes in 1996, is already host to a team in the second-tier American Hockey League, the Manitoba Moose. During the announcement Tuesday, True North stated that they were starting a season ticket drive. They also announced that they have yet to choose a name for the new team.

The Thrashers are not the first franchise that True North has set its sights on in regards to acquiring an NHL team. The Coyotes, which have been owned by the league since the previous owners filed for bankruptcy in 2009, was highly sought-after by True North in the past few years in an attempt to literally “return the Jets to Winnipeg”. In early May, the Glendale City Council approved a measure to pay $25 million to the league, to cover their operating expenses for the next year in order to keep the team in the city.

This is not the first time an NHL franchise has been relocated north of the border from the #8-ranked media market in the United States; in 1980, the Atlanta Flames moved to Calgary, Alberta, becoming the Calgary Flames. Atlanta was later granted an expansion franchise in 1997, and the Thrashers took the ice to start the 1999-00 NHL season. In the 11 seasons the Thrashers spent in Atlanta, they made the playoffs only once; in the 2006-07 season, they reached the Eastern Conference quarterfinals, where they were swept in the best-of-seven series by the New York Rangers in four straight games.

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June 3, 2010

Ice Hockey: Claude Giroux scores overtime goal to lift Flyers to victory in Game 3 of the 2010 Stanley Cup Finals

Ice Hockey: Claude Giroux scores overtime goal to lift Flyers to victory in Game 3 of the 2010 Stanley Cup Finals

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Thursday, June 3, 2010

  1 2 3 OT Total
Chicago Blackhawks 0 2 1 0 3
Philadelphia Flyers 1 1 1 1 4

A Claude Giroux goal 5:59 into the overtime period of play lifted the Philadelphia Flyers to a 4–3 victory over the Chicago Blackhawks in Game 3 of the 2010 Stanley Cup Finals Wednesday night in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in the eastern United States. The Flyers victory cuts the Blackhawks’ series lead to 2–1.

Claude Giroux, seen here in 2007, scored the game-winning goal in overtime of Game 3 of the 2010 Stanley Cup Finals.
Image: Chuck2k6.

Giroux’s goal came on a redirection off Matt Carle’s pass, squeezing the through the right arm and leg of Blackhawks goalie Antti Niemi.

“I tried to get a stick on it, and it just trickled in,” Giroux said. “Our line started playing well, so anytime your line’s going you just play better I think. The whole team just showed up tonight, and we really wanted that win.

“Desperation was the key word, I think. It’s almost do or die.”

Like the first two games, this one was decided by a one-goal margin, but was not as loose as the 6–5 Game 1 or tight as the 2–1 Game 2.

The Flyers hit first — converting on their first power play chance — when right-winger Danny Brière, who had been drifting deep in the offensive zone took a pass just in front of the net and put it past Niemi at the 14:58 mark of the first period. Leading up to the play, Blackhawk Marián Hossa has been sent to the penalty box for slashing, breaking the stick of a Flyers player. Scott Hartnell and Braydon Coburn provided assists on the play.

Chicago started the second period at a disadvantage after Dustin Byfuglien was sent off for roughing after a scuffle involving teammate Patrick Kane and Flyer Kimmo Timonen at the end of the first period. The Flyers could not take advantage as Mike Richards missed two great chances. The Blackhawks went right back down the ice and scored less than a minute after Byfuglien’s penalty expired, with a Duncan Keith shot from midway into the offensive zone at the 2:49 mark. Kane and Hossa had assists on the play.

A Dustin Byfuglien penalty for slashing at 9:31 led to a Flyers power play. In the power play, a Chris Pronger shot sent the arena into a frenzy as both the goal light and the arena horn went off, but the game officials did not award the goal to the Flyers. After a further 1:26 of game time, play finally stopped after an icing call. After a video review, officials awarded Philadelphia’s Scott Hartnell the goal.

After a stoppage in play, John Madden won the puck and passed it back to Brent Sopel, who shot a one-timer from the point into the far corner of the net to tie the game at the 17:52 mark of the second period.

The third period began with a goal-scoring flurry. With less than three minutes gone in the period, Kane scored a breakaway goal for Chicago at the 2:50 mark. Just 20 seconds later, Ville Leino collected a rebound off goalkeeper Niemi’s pad to tie the game. Jonathan Toews and Ben Eager collected assists on the Chicago goal, while Giroux collected the assist on Philadelphia’s goal. The goals were the only two of the third period and the game went to overtime.

At the 5:03 mark of the overtime period, a Flyers shot hit off the goal post and trickled down the line and before Niemi was able to secure the puck briefly. The arena staff blew the horn signaling a home goal before the puck was secured. A Flyers player managed to knock the puck into the back of the net, but upon video review, a no-goal was awarded with the game officials determining that the whistle signaling stoppage of play had been blown before the puck had been knocked loose. The respite for Chicago was brief as Giroux’s goal came just 56 seconds later.

Immediately after the game, Flyers captain Mike Richards told CBC Sports that the game-winning goal was a big relief to the team.

“We came out and played hard,” Richards said. “Both teams played extremely well and we were lucky to get the last goal.”

As for the goal that was called off in overtime, Richards said that the Flyers players did not really hear the whistle.

Niemi and Flyers counterpart Michael Leighton had 28 and 24 saves respectively.

Both teams had three power-play opportunities, all six of which occurred in the first two periods of play. Philadelphia was two for three in those chances while Chicago did not convert any.

Chicago and Philadelphia continue the best-of-seven series on Friday night at Philadelphia’s Wachovia Center. The Stanley Cup will determine the 2009–10 National Hockey League champion after the top 16 teams earned the right to compete in the postseason. The NHL has 30 teams in the United States and Canada and attracts many international players.



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June 1, 2010

Ice hockey: Blackhawks score two goals in 28 seconds to gain 2-0 series lead in the 2010 Stanley Cup Finals

Ice hockey: Blackhawks score two goals in 28 seconds to gain 2-0 series lead in the 2010 Stanley Cup Finals

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Tuesday, June 1, 2010

  1 2 3 Total
Philadelphia Flyers 0 0 1 1
Chicago Blackhawks 0 2 0 2

In ice hockey, the Chicago Blackhawks scored two goals just 28 seconds apart late in the second period to take a 2–0 series lead over the Philadelphia Flyers in Game 2 of the 2010 Stanley Cup Finals Monday night in Chicago, United States.

Ben Eager scored the game-winning goal at the 17:39 mark of second period to give the Chicago Blackhawks a 2–0 series lead over the Philadelphia Flyers in Game 2 of the 2010 Stanley Cup Finals.
Image: Resolute.

Marián Hossa scored Chicago’s first goal at the 17:09 mark of the second period on slap shot deep in the Blackhawk’s defensive zone. Left-wingers Troy Brouwer and Patrick Sharp provided assists on the goal.

Ben Eager scored the game-winner at the 17:37 mark of the second period on a feed from Dustin Byfuglien. Eager scored his goal on a wrist shot from 38 feet.

Philadelphia’s lone goal came in the third period, when Simon Gagné scored at the 5:20 mark. Centers Mike Richards and Jeff Carter provides assists on the goal.

Unlike the first game, this one was marked by impressive defensive efforts from both sides. Chicago goalkeeper Antti Niemi made 32 saves, earning the Player-of-the-Game honor from the National Hockey League. His counterpart, Michael Leighton who was pulled in Game 1 after giving up five goals, collected 24 saves.

“It’s unbelievable feeling how the people react,” Niemi said after the game, according to the Associated Press. “Defense was the key.”

Flyers coach Peter Laviolette also acknowledged Niemi, who collected 14 of his 32 saves in the third period.

“I thought their goaltender played extremely well in the third period. We had more than enough looks to tie up that game,” Laviolette said, according to the Associated Press.

After a fairly clean game on Saturday, Game 2 had a decided edge, which resulted in ten penalties. Neither team capitalized on their power play opportunities. At the 17:27 mark of the first period, three players were sent off: Chicago’s Game 1 hero Tomáš Kopecký for roughing, with Philadelphia’s Richards and Daniel Carcillo going to the box of elbowing and unsportsmanlike conduct, respectively.

Chicago and Philadelphia continue the best-of-seven series on Wednesday night at Philadelphia’s Wachovia Center. The Stanley Cup will determine the 2009–10 National Hockey League champion after the top 16 teams earned the right to compete in the postseason. The NHL has 30 teams in the United States and Canada and attracts many international players.



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May 30, 2010

Ice Hockey: Blackhawks take first 2010 Stanley Cup Finals game in 11-goal thriller

Ice Hockey: Blackhawks take first 2010 Stanley Cup Finals game in 11-goal thriller

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Sunday, May 30, 2010

In ice hockey, Tomáš Kopecký scored the game-winning goal for the Chicago Blackhawks 8:25 into the third period to lift the Blackhawks over the Philadelphia Flyers in Game 1 of the 2010 Stanley Cup Finals Saturday night in Chicago, United States. The game started exciting, with five goals each in the first two periods, but Kopecký’s game-winner was the sole third-period goal.

Tomáš Kopecký scored the game-winning goal for the Blackhawks.
Image: Matt Boulton from Vancouver, Canada.

Ville Leino opened the scoring for the Flyers at the 6:38 mark of the first period with Chicago’s Troy Brouwer answered back just 68 seconds later. After teammate Patrick Kane was sent off for slashing, Chicago’s Dave Bolland scored a short-handed goal to but the Blackhawks ahead. Six minutes later, Brian Campbell was sent off for high-sticking and the Flyers converted on the power play with Scott Hartnell lighting the lamp for Philadelphia. Daniel Brière put the Flyers 3–2 up going into the first intermission with just 27 seconds left in the period.

With the second period just 71 seconds old, Patrick Sharp evened the score at three. Blackhawk Adam Burish was sent off for boarding at the 4:59 mark, but the Flyers could not extend their lead, ending up converting one of their four power plays (Ben Eager was sent off for cross checking early in the first period). Blair Betts gave the Flyers their final lead of the game with a shot at the 7:20 mark of the period. The Blackhawks’ Kris Versteeg responded two minutes later and at 15:18 mark the Brouwer completed his three-point night with his second goal. Philadelphia’s Arron Asham evened the score at five a-piece to complete the period.

The third period was a relatively quiet one, with just 14 shots compared to to 26 and 24 shots in the first two periods, respectively. Each team had 32 shots. Kopecký’s goal was the lone action as the Slovak national slipped the puck past Flyers goalkeeper Brian Boucher, who had 11 saves in 24 minutes on the ice. Boucher replaced Michael Leighton, who stopped 15 of 20 shots. Blackhawk counterpart Antti Niemi collected 27 of 32 shots.

The game was the Blackhawks’ first Finals victory since 1973. In 1992, they were swept by the Pittsburg Penguins.

Chicago and Philadelphia continue the best-of-seven series on Monday night at Chicago’s United Center. The Stanley Cup will determine the 2009-10 National Hockey League champion after the top 16 teams earn the right to compete in the postseason. The NHL has 30 teams in the United States and Canada and attracts many international players.



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May 8, 2010

Ice Hockey: Detroit Red Wings beat San Jose Sharks 7-1 in fourth NHL quarter final match

Ice Hockey: Detroit Red Wings beat San Jose Sharks 7-1 in fourth NHL quarter final match

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Saturday, May 8, 2010

The Detroit Red wings beat the San Jose Sharks 7–1 in their fourth quarter final match of the 2010 Stanley Cup playoffs on Thursday night, reducing San Jose’s series lead to three games to one.

Detroit would go up to a five goal to zero lead in the first period, with Johan Franzén scoring three goals (commonly known as a hat-trick). In the second period, Detroit scored one another goal to take a six goal to zero lead. Dany Heatley of the San Jose Sharks eventually scored to reduce Detroits lead to six goals to one in the same period, but could not lift the team to score any more.

In the third period, Franzén scored his fourth and final goal of the game. Detroit won seven goals to one.

The next game will be hosted by San Jose on Saturday night. If the San Jose Sharks win Game 5, they will advance to the Conference Finals. Detroit are forced to win three games in a row in order to advance to the Conference Finals. The winning team in this series (first team to win 4 games) will advance to the Conference Finals of the Western Conference, where they’ll either meet the Chicago Blackhawks or the Vancouver Canucks. The Canucks are currently leading that series, 3 games to 1.

The winning team in the Conference Finals of the Western Conference will advance to the Stanley Cup Final, also a best-of-7-games-series, where they meet the winner of the Conference Finals of the Eastern Conference.



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February 17, 2010

Hockey player Georges Laraque joins Green Party of Canada

Hockey player Georges Laraque joins Green Party of Canada

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Wednesday, February 17, 2010

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File photo of Georges Laraque in 2009.
Image: Resolute .

Former Montreal Canadiens hockey player Georges Laraque has joined the Green Party of Canada, according to the party and The Canadian Press. The player will be filling an undefined role for the time being, but Laraque isn’t ruling out running in the next federal elections.

“I’m ready to do whatever I can to help,” Laraque said Saturday in Montreal.

“We’re destroying the environment now and we have to make a change. To make a change you need public personalities to talk about it, to educate people. And I’m going to be one of them.”

“The Green Party has been active in Parliament in Europe and Australia for many years, and it has been to their benefit. It is high time for Canada to build a strong Green Party and to elect MPs who will speak out for a modern, sustainable and just vision of our development and choices,” said Jacques Rivard, Deputy Leader of the Green Party of Canada.

Laraque has been a long time vegan, meaning he eats no meat or other products derived from animals, like milk and cheese; and an animal rights activist. Last month he was released by the Canadiens, popularly known as the Habs, after scoring only one goal.



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January 3, 2010

NHL: Boston Bruins win Winter Classic in overtime

NHL: Boston Bruins win Winter Classic in overtime

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Sunday, January 3, 2010

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Philadelphia Flyers 1 2 Boston Bruins

Marco Sturm scored the winning goal in overtime. (File photo)
Image: Dan4th.

The Boston Bruins won against the Philadelphia Flyers at Boston’s historic Fenway Park becoming the first home team to win the NHL Winter Classic in front of a crowd of 38,112 Friday.

Before the game began, a ceremonial face-off took place between Bruins’ legend Bobby Orr and Flyers’ legend Bobby Clarke who represented their respective teams as honorary captains.

The first period went by with both teams tied scoreless at 0-0. However, fists went flying, in the first ever Winter Classic fight, between the Bruins’ Shawn Thornton and the Flyers’ Daniel Carcillo, who was looking to fight. Thornton said of the fight, “It wasn’t about that. He was out there and asked a couple guys. I don’t think it’s anybody else’s job to do that. There’s nobody on the team that has the same role as me. So I went and obliged.”

Thornton added, “Yeah, first one ever, I guess. You’ve been reminding me about it for the last six months. It happened. Now it’s over and we can stop talking about it.”

Then at 4:42 in the second period, Danny Syvret, gave the Flyers their first point in what was Syvret’s first goal of his NHL career. The game went in the third period with the Flyers leading, 1-0.

However, the Bruins made a comeback in the third period on a power play, when former Flyer Mark Reechi tied the game 1-1 with 2:18 left in the period. The game went into “extra innings” at Fenway with both teams battling back forth until the very end with the Bruins’ Marco Sturm gained control of the puck from the Flyers’ Matt Carle hitting the puck to fellow teammate Patrice Bergeron.

Bergeron gained control of the puck and turned it to pass to Sturm who read Bergeron’s movement. Sturm tipped the puck into net, winning the game for the Bruins at 3:03 in overtime driving the crowd in Fenway wild as the team swarmed Sturm to congratulate him.

The Bruins congratulate Marco Sturm after scoring the winning goal
Image: Eric Kilby.

Bruins’ goalie Tim Thomas also achieved a dream of his as after the game concluded the United States men’s national ice hockey team announced it’s roster for the 2010 Winter Olympics which included the goalie. The team will play at 2010 Winter Olympics next month in Vancouver, British Columbia.

However, the rink in Fenway won’t come down just yet, Yesterday at 2PM EDT, the Bruins held the AT&T Legends Classic where former Bruins legends such as Cam Neely and Terry O’Reilly and current Bruins’ coach Claude Julien were joined by celebrities such as Worcester, Massachusetts native actor and comedian Denis Leary, along with Kiefer Sutherland and film director Bobby Farrelly with groups facing off in two teams. The game was held despite the snow which has been forecast for the Boston area.

Then, on January 8th, a double NCAA college hockey doubleheader will take place at Fenway Park as the women’s ice hockey teams of the University of New Hampshire Wildcats and Northeastern University Huskies in the first ever outdoor women’s ice hockey game.

After that game ends, the infamous Green Line Rivalry will come to Fenway as long-time rivals, the 2008 NCAA Men’s Ice Hockey Champions Boston College Eagles take on the 2009 champions, the Boston University Terriers.



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June 13, 2009

Pittsburgh Penguins win Stanley Cup

Pittsburgh Penguins win Stanley Cup – Wikinews, the free news source

Pittsburgh Penguins win Stanley Cup

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Saturday, June 13, 2009

Max Talbot (PIT)

On Friday, the Pittsburgh Penguins defeated the Detroit Red Wings in game seven of the 2009 Stanley Cup Finals to win their third Stanley Cup. Max Talbot scored all of the Penguins goals to give them a 2-1 win over the Red Wings. In winning the cup, the Penguins became the first team in 38 years to win a Stanley Cup Finals game seven while playing on the road. Pittsburgh last won the Stanley Cup in 1992.

This Stanley Cup run was not an easy one for the Penguins. In the opening round of the playoffs, the Penguins took six games to defeat in-state rivals, the Philadelphia Flyers. The second round series against the Washington Capitals featured a highly-touted individual matchup, as the Penguins young star Sidney Crosby matched skills against Alexander Ovechkin of the Capitals; it took the Penguins all seven games to win that series. The Penguins rolled the Carolina Hurricanes in a four game sweep to win the Eastern Conference title. In the Finals, they found themselves down three games to two against the Red Wings, a dynasty which has won four Cups in the past 12 seasons, and was the defending champion.

The Penguins win in game seven was not only due to the scoring of Max Talbot; Penguins goalie Marc-Andre Fleury allowed only one goal on 25 shots. The Penguins young star, Sidney Crosby had little impact on this game; though he was the second highest scorer of the entire playoffs, a hip injury in the second period kept him out of half of the game.

After a scoreless first period, Pittsburgh’s Max Talbot scored on an assist from Evgeni Malkin only 1:13 into the second period. Talbot added to his first goal with a second at the 10:07 mark in the second period, on assists from Chris Kunitz and Rob Scuderi. The final score came in the third period, at 13:53, as Jonathan Ericsson scored Detroit’s only goal of the game, on assists from Nicklas Lidström and Jiri Hudler.

The game featured five minor penalties; two by Detroit and three by Pittsburgh; all were inconsequential as all three goals were scored at full-strength.



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March 13, 2009

“Mrs. Hockey” Colleen Howe is laid to rest

Friday, March 13, 2009

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Hundreds of mourners paid their last respects in honour of Colleen Howe yesterday at St. Hugo of the Hills Church in Michigan, United States.

According to a statement released by the Detroit Red Wings, Howe, who was a business entrepreneur and sports agent with the nickname “Mrs. Hockey”, died on Friday of Pick’s disease, in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. She was 76 years old.

Howe, who was born in Sandusky, Michigan in 1933, was most famous for establishing Power Play International and Power Play Publications to manage the hockey career of her husband Gordie Howe and her sons, Marty and Mark. She established the first Junior A hockey team to the United States and Michigan’s first indoor ice hockey rink.

Howe is survived by husband Gordie Howe, sons Marty, Mark, Dr. Murray A., daughter Cathy Purnell nee Howe, nine grandchildren and one great grandchild.

Red Wings owners Mike and Marian Ilitch and Red Wings coach Mike Babcock attended the funeral along with vice president Steve Yzerman, Red Wings players Kris Draper Brian Rafalskim, Pavel Datsyuk, and Henrik Zetterberg. Amid the Red Wings contingent was also captain Nicklas Lidstrom.

Retired hockey players also paid their respects, in attendance were Bill Gadsby, Johnny Wilson, Frank Mahovlich, Alex Delvecchio, and Brian Watson.

Howe’s motto was “Why not?” said her son, during the services.

Gordie Howe at Gordie Howe Night at the Pacific Coliseum in March 2008.
Image: Sean Hagen.

Howe was diagnosed in 2002 with Pick’s disease, an incurable neurological disease that causes dementia. Red Wings general manager Ken Holland held a moment of silence before the Red Wings and Columbus Blue Jackets hockey game last Saturday. When a picture of Howe and Gordie lit up the scoreboard, fans responded with a standing ovation at the Friday, March 6 Vancouver Giants’ game against the Calgary Hitmen in the Pacific Coliseum.

Howe was one of the founders of the Detroit Junior Red Wings, the first Junior A hockey team in the United States. Howe served as general manager for three years with the Detroit Junior Red Wings. As an assertive and business savvy sports agent she formed Power Play International to manage Gordie, Marty and Mark’s business interests. Howe trademarked Gordie Howe’s name and nickname, “Mr. Hockey”, and her own nickname, “Mrs. Hockey”, as registered trademarks.

Howe was instrumental in the construction of the Gordie Howe Hockeyland arena, Michigan as well as the first Michigan indoor ice hockey rink. She was named Sportswoman of the Year in Detroit in 1972 followed by Michigan Sportswoman of the Year in 1973.

The Colleen J. Howe Arena, Sandusky, Michigan, was named in her honour. The Colleen & Gordie Howe Middle School, Abbotsford, British Columbia, British Columbia and the Howe Arena in Traverse City, Mich. are also named in their honour.

Howe established the 1993 Gordie Howe tribute tour in 65 cities and the Howe Foundation which supports charities. She was also the proud recipient of The Hartford Chamber of Commerce award for outstanding community achievement in 1979.

Howe and Gordie jointly received the Wayne Gretsky Award from the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame in 2001.

Howe wrote the book My Three Hockey Players published in 1975 which became her first venture into writing. Howe, Gordie and Charles Wikins collaborated on the book After the Applause published 1989, followed by When the Final Buzzer Sounds in 2000. A 20th Century Hockey Chronicle written by Howe and Gordie was published in 1994, And …Howe!: An Authorized Autobiography was written together by Howe, Gordie and Tom Delisle and released in 1995. The final joint venture between Howe and Gordie was You Read to Me & I’ll Read to You: 20th-Century Stories to Share which came out in print in 2001. Charities were supported by proceeds from the sales of her books.

Both Gordie and I stem from humble, rural origins. We have been fortunate to see the positive effects hockey has had on our lives, our family’s lives and the lives of millions of others.

—Colleen Howe. Letter to the Colleen J. Howe Arena Sanilac County Hockey Association

Howe was born as Colleen Joffa, to a farming family in Sandusky, Michigan and married Gordie Howe on April 15, 1953. Together they had four children, Mark, Marty, Murray and Cathy. Together they had four children, Marty, Mark, Dr. Murray A. and Cathy Purnell nee Howe. Her son, Murray diverged from the family’s footsteps, becoming a doctor, and helped treat Howe during her ordeal with Pick’s disease. Howe is survived by nine grandchildren and one great grandchild.

Howe’s most remarkable negotiation as sports agent occurred in 1973, when she brought Gordie out of retirement and arranged for Mark, Marty and Gordie to all play together on the Houston Aeros. The three had also played together for the Hartford Whalers. Gordon “Gordie” Howe, Mr. Hockey, OC is a retired professional ice hockey player from Saskatchewan, Canada who played for the Detroit Red Wings and Hartford Whalers of the National Hockey League (NHL), and the Houston Aeros and New England Whalers in the World Hockey Association.


Sources

  • “Colleen Howe’s funeral scheduled for 11 AM today”. Detroit Free Press, March 11, 2009
  • AP “Services held for ‘Mrs. Hockey,’ Colleen Howe”. International Herald Tribune, March 11, 2009
  • “Colleen Howe, ’Mrs. Hockey,’ remembered as wife, mother and friend”. Associated Press, March 11, 2009
  • AP “Mrs. Hockey a ‘valued woman'”. The Globe and Mail, March 11, 2009 ·
  • “Mourners set to honor ‘Mrs. Hockey’ Colleen Howe”. The Associated Press, March 11, 2009
  • Neil Stevens “Colleen Howe, wife of hockey great Gordie Howe, dies at age 76”. The Canadian Press, March 7, 2009
  • “TheStar.com World Colleen Howe, 76: Mrs. Hockey a business all-star”. The Toronto Star, March 7, 2009
  • The StarPhoenix “Colleen Howe called a hockey pioneer – Founded junior team, managed Gordie’s career”. Canwest News Service, March 7, 2009
  • Santiago Esparza “Howe mass scheduled for Wednesday”. The Detroit News, March 7, 2009
  • “Colleen Howe, wife of hockey legend Gordie Howe, has died, according to a statement released by the Detroit Red Wings.”. MSN, March 6, 2009
  • “Colleen Howe passes away at 76”. National Hockey League, March 6, 2009
  • “‘Mrs. Hockey’ Colleen Howe dies”. CBC News, March 6, 2009
  • George Sipple “Fans mourn loss of “Mrs. Hockey,” Colleen Howe”. Detroit Free Press, March 6, 2009
  • Ian Walker “HOCKEY: Gordie and Colleen Howe honoured at Giants game”. The Vancouver Sun, March 6, 2009
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

“Mrs. Hockey” Colleen Howe is laid to rest

Friday, March 13, 2009

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Hundreds of mourners paid their last respects in honour of Colleen Howe yesterday at St. Hugo of the Hills Church in Michigan, United States.

According to a statement released by the Detroit Red Wings, Howe, who was a business entrepreneur and sports agent with the nickname “Mrs. Hockey”, died on Friday of Pick’s disease, in Bloomfield Hills, Michigan. She was 76 years old.

Howe, who was born in Sandusky, Michigan in 1933, was most famous for establishing Power Play International and Power Play Publications to manage the hockey career of her husband Gordie Howe and her sons, Marty and Mark. She established the first Junior A hockey team to the United States and Michigan’s first indoor ice hockey rink.

Howe is survived by husband Gordie Howe, sons Marty, Mark, Dr. Murray A., daughter Cathy Purnell nee Howe, nine grandchildren and one great grandchild.

Red Wings owners Mike and Marian Ilitch and Red Wings coach Mike Babcock attended the funeral along with vice president Steve Yzerman, Red Wings players Kris Draper Brian Rafalskim, Pavel Datsyuk, and Henrik Zetterberg. Amid the Red Wings contingent was also captain Nicklas Lidstrom.

Retired hockey players also paid their respects, in attendance were Bill Gadsby, Johnny Wilson, Frank Mahovlich, Alex Delvecchio, and Brian Watson.

Howe’s motto was “Why not?” said her son, during the services.

Gordie Howe at Gordie Howe Night at the Pacific Coliseum in March 2008.
Image: Sean Hagen.

Howe was diagnosed in 2002 with Pick’s disease, an incurable neurological disease that causes dementia. Red Wings general manager Ken Holland held a moment of silence before the Red Wings and Columbus Blue Jackets hockey game last Saturday. When a picture of Howe and Gordie lit up the scoreboard, fans responded with a standing ovation at the Friday, March 6 Vancouver Giants’ game against the Calgary Hitmen in the Pacific Coliseum.

Howe was one of the founders of the Detroit Junior Red Wings, the first Junior A hockey team in the United States. Howe served as general manager for three years with the Detroit Junior Red Wings. As an assertive and business savvy sports agent she formed Power Play International to manage Gordie, Marty and Mark’s business interests. Howe trademarked Gordie Howe’s name and nickname, “Mr. Hockey”, and her own nickname, “Mrs. Hockey”, as registered trademarks.

Howe was instrumental in the construction of the Gordie Howe Hockeyland arena, Michigan as well as the first Michigan indoor ice hockey rink. She was named Sportswoman of the Year in Detroit in 1972 followed by Michigan Sportswoman of the Year in 1973.

The Colleen J. Howe Arena, Sandusky, Michigan, was named in her honour. The Colleen & Gordie Howe Middle School, Abbotsford, British Columbia, British Columbia and the Howe Arena in Traverse City, Mich. are also named in their honour.

Howe established the 1993 Gordie Howe tribute tour in 65 cities and the Howe Foundation which supports charities. She was also the proud recipient of The Hartford Chamber of Commerce award for outstanding community achievement in 1979.

Howe and Gordie jointly received the Wayne Gretsky Award from the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame in 2001.

Howe wrote the book My Three Hockey Players published in 1975 which became her first venture into writing. Howe, Gordie and Charles Wikins collaborated on the book After the Applause published 1989, followed by When the Final Buzzer Sounds in 2000. A 20th Century Hockey Chronicle written by Howe and Gordie was published in 1994, And …Howe!: An Authorized Autobiography was written together by Howe, Gordie and Tom Delisle and released in 1995. The final joint venture between Howe and Gordie was You Read to Me & I’ll Read to You: 20th-Century Stories to Share which came out in print in 2001. Charities were supported by proceeds from the sales of her books.

Both Gordie and I stem from humble, rural origins. We have been fortunate to see the positive effects hockey has had on our lives, our family’s lives and the lives of millions of others.

—Colleen Howe. Letter to the Colleen J. Howe Arena Sanilac County Hockey Association

Howe was born as Colleen Joffa, to a farming family in Sandusky, Michigan and married Gordie Howe on April 15, 1953. Together they had four children, Mark, Marty, Murray and Cathy. Together they had four children, Marty, Mark, Dr. Murray A. and Cathy Purnell nee Howe. Her son, Murray diverged from the family’s footsteps, becoming a doctor, and helped treat Howe during her ordeal with Pick’s disease. Howe is survived by nine grandchildren and one great grandchild.

Howe’s most remarkable negotiation as sports agent occurred in 1973, when she brought Gordie out of retirement and arranged for Mark, Marty and Gordie to all play together on the Houston Aeros. The three had also played together for the Hartford Whalers. Gordon “Gordie” Howe, Mr. Hockey, OC is a retired professional ice hockey player from Saskatchewan, Canada who played for the Detroit Red Wings and Hartford Whalers of the National Hockey League (NHL), and the Houston Aeros and New England Whalers in the World Hockey Association.


Sources

  • “Colleen Howe’s funeral scheduled for 11 AM today”. Detroit Free Press, March 11, 2009
  • AP “Services held for ‘Mrs. Hockey,’ Colleen Howe”. International Herald Tribune, March 11, 2009
  • “Colleen Howe, ’Mrs. Hockey,’ remembered as wife, mother and friend”. Associated Press, March 11, 2009
  • AP “Mrs. Hockey a ‘valued woman'”. The Globe and Mail, March 11, 2009 ·
  • “Mourners set to honor ‘Mrs. Hockey’ Colleen Howe”. The Associated Press, March 11, 2009
  • Neil Stevens “Colleen Howe, wife of hockey great Gordie Howe, dies at age 76”. The Canadian Press, March 7, 2009
  • “TheStar.com World Colleen Howe, 76: Mrs. Hockey a business all-star”. The Toronto Star, March 7, 2009
  • The StarPhoenix “Colleen Howe called a hockey pioneer – Founded junior team, managed Gordie’s career”. Canwest News Service, March 7, 2009
  • Santiago Esparza “Howe mass scheduled for Wednesday”. The Detroit News, March 7, 2009
  • “Colleen Howe, wife of hockey legend Gordie Howe, has died, according to a statement released by the Detroit Red Wings.”. MSN, March 6, 2009
  • “Colleen Howe passes away at 76”. National Hockey League, March 6, 2009
  • “‘Mrs. Hockey’ Colleen Howe dies”. CBC News, March 6, 2009
  • George Sipple “Fans mourn loss of “Mrs. Hockey,” Colleen Howe”. Detroit Free Press, March 6, 2009
  • Ian Walker “HOCKEY: Gordie and Colleen Howe honoured at Giants game”. The Vancouver Sun, March 6, 2009


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
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