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May 17, 2016

Telegraph publishes letter from 300 business leaders who back UK leaving EU

Filed under: Archived,Daily Telegraph (United Kingdom),United Kingdom — admin @ 5:00 am

Telegraph publishes letter from 300 business leaders who back UK leaving EU

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Tuesday, May 17, 2016

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A letter from more than 300 business leaders was published on Sunday in The Telegraph in support of the United Kingdom (UK) voting to leave the European Union (EU) in the EU referendum next month.

The signators, writing in a personal capacity, are connected with businesses of small to medium size. This is in contrast to multiple, high-profile, supporters of Britain Stronger in Europe, the official campaign to stay in Europe. This support has included financial donations from companies such as JPMorgan Chase and Citigroup. Those supporting a vote to leave the EU have previously claimed the campaign to remain is only supported by big business.

The Telegraph suggested the letter would be interpreted as a response to last week’s warnings from the International Monetary Fund and Bank of England that voting to leave the EU would have negative consequences for Britain’s economy. These institutions warned that the UK leaving the EU would increase uncertainty as new trade agreements were negotiated, and cause a fall in the value of the pound sterling. One of the signatories, Lord Farmer, has also stated the EU will still want to trade with the UK, and has “no reason to put up barriers.”

The letter’s publishing coincides with that of research from Vote Leave stating UK exports to the EU have performed worse over the last fifteen years than any other EU country. Vote Leave argue this shows “the ‘single market’ has failed British exporters”.



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June 18, 2005

Associated Press publishes 6 new \”secret and confidential\” Downing Street memos

Associated Press publishes 6 new “secret and confidential” Downing Street memos

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Saturday, June 18, 2005

The Associated Press has put typed copies of six recently obtained internal British government documents concerning the lead-up to the war in Iraq on its website which are labeled “secret” or “confidential”. The copies were provided by British reporter Michael Smith, who claims he destroyed the original documents to protect the sources. An anonymous senior British official said the documents appeared authentic.

The documents were leaked on 18 September 2004 to The Daily Telegraph in an article titled “Secret papers show Blair was warned of Iraq chaos“. The documents, however, took 9 months to reach the mainstream press.

AP is saying that the memos show; “When Prime Minister Tony Blair’s chief foreign policy adviser dined with Condoleezza Rice six months after Sept. 11, the then-U.S. national security adviser didn’t want to discuss Osama bin Laden or al-Qaida. She wanted to talk about ‘regime change’ in Iraq, setting the stage for the U.S.-led invasion more than a year later.”

“U.S. scrambling to establish a link between Iraq and al-Qaida is so far frankly unconvincing,” British Foreign Office political director Peter Ricketts said in one of the memos. “For Iraq, `regime change’ does not stack up. It sounds like a grudge between Bush and Saddam.” Ricketts said.

Another memo addressed to Foreign Secretary Jack Straw says,”But even the best survey of Iraq’s WMD programs will not show much advance in recent years on the nuclear, missile or CW/BW (chemical or biological weapons) fronts: the programs are extremely worrying but have not, as far as we know, been stepped up.”

The memos express concern about breaking international law but Blair is shown as being determined to go to war as America’s ally regardless.

An Iraq expert at the University of London, Tony Dodge said, “The documents show what official inquiries in Britain already have, that the case of weapons of mass destruction was based on thin intelligence and was used to inflate the evidence to the level of mendacity. In going to war with Bush, Blair defended the special relationship between the two countries, like other British leaders have. But he knew he was taking a huge political risk at home. He knew the war’s legality was questionable and its unpopularity was never in doubt.” Dodge also said the memos show that Blair was aware that postwar instability was likely for Iraq.

In one of the memos, David Manning, who was Blair’s chief foreign policy adviser, reported on a meeting in Washington with Rice: “It is clear that Bush is grateful for your (Blair’s) support and has registered that you are getting flak. I said that you would not budge in your support for regime change but you had to manage a press, a Parliament and a public opinion that was very different than anything in the States. And you would not budge either in your insistence that, if we pursued regime change, it must be very carefully done and produce the right result. Failure was not an option.”

A March 22 memo from Ricketts to Foreign Secretary Straw said, “We have to be convincing that: the threat is so serious/imminent that it is worth sending our troops to die for; it is qualitatively different from the threat posed by other proliferators who are closer to achieving nuclear capability (including Iran).”



Sources

Memos on AP website

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.