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December 9, 2012

Three dead after setting themselves on fire in Tibet

Three dead after setting themselves on fire in Tibet

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Sunday, December 9, 2012

In three separate cases in Tibet, three people have died in the past two days after they set themselves on fire in protest of Chinese occupation of Tibet.

Yesterday, Pema Dorje, 23, and Kunchok Phelgye, 24, died after they set themselves on fire in front of monasteries in northeastern and eastern Tibet. Then today, Bhenchen Kyi, 17, died after she set herself on fire in the Tsekhog, Rebkong region.

The deaths are described as self-immolations, where a person or persons set themselves on fire as a form of protest, often resulting in death. The first Tibetan reported case happened in 2009 when a monk named ‘Tapey‘ set himself on fire in Kirti Gompa. He survived the incident. Since then, reportedly at least 95 people have attempted self-immolation, 28 of those in November of this year.

Authorities say the self-immolations may be incited and as a result, have arrested two men believed to be connected to the cases. Today, Chinese authorities announced the arrests of Lorang Konchok, 40, and his nephew Lorang Tsering, 31, who were arrested in August. Konchok is a Monk working at a monastery in Sichuan. In a confession Konchol claims he was working on orders from the Dalai Lama and his followers. He also says he recruited Tsering to help instigate the incidents, telling potential individuals they would be “heroes” if they went through with the immolation. Authorities say the two men were attempting to persuade more people to go through with the immolations, but those people backed out after police, family members, and government officials intervened.

Lobsang Choedak, a spokesperson for the Tibetan government in exile in India, denies the allegations against Konchok and Tsering saying, “We believe [the suspects] have been forced to make these confessions. We would welcome the Chinese government investigating whether we are instigating these immolations.”



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January 18, 2012

India and China to develop friendly relations

India and China to develop friendly relations

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Wednesday, January 18, 2012

Politics and conflicts
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India and China planned to resolve boundary disputes peacefully and develop friendly relations with each other in the 15th round of boundary talks begun Monday. Shivshankar Menon, National Security Advisor, represented India while Dai Bingguo represented China.

To control the Sino-Indian border effectively, Liu Zhenmin, China’s Assistant Foreign Minister, and S. Jaishankar, India’s ambassador to China, signed an agreement titled “Working Mechanism for Consultation and Coordination on India-China Border Affairs”. The text of the agreement, as released by the Indian Ministry of External Affairs, states, “[The mechanism will] undertake other tasks that are mutually agreed upon by the two sides but will not discuss resolution of the Boundary Question or affect the Special Representatives Mechanism.”

The agreement allows live contact between the countries’ foreign offices for problems along the Sino-Indian border, officially called the Line of Actual Control (LOAC). Also, meetings are to be held in each of the two countries alternately, once or twice annually. The two sides see the agreement as an important step in gaining trust and strengthening each other.

Relations between the two countries have not been good since the Sino-Indian War of 1962. The relations lapsed in 2011 due to visa rows and exploration of oil in South China Sea. Further, the Dalai Lama’s refuge in India has caused friction with China. China also claims 90,000 square kilometers of land governed by India in the Tibetan region and India claims 38,000 square kilometers of Kashmir held by China.

Analysts say China is facing both economic problems, and difficulties with neighbouring countries. Its major allies North Korea and Pakistan have their own troubles. China maintains unfavorable relations with other neighbours like Vietnam, Australia, and Japan.

The ‘return to Asia’ strategy of the United States focuses on China, and India figures in it as an important ally.

Dai wrote in a newspaper column, “What we face is a golden period to grow China-India relations. The world has enough space for China and India to achieve common development, as there are so many areas for us to work together”. He further added during the session, “While working hard to develop itself, China is fully committed to developing long-term friendship and cooperation with India.”

Dai claimed trade between the two countries has increased by a factor of 20 in the last ten years. He summarized, “As neighbors and two big countries with a combined population of 2.5 billion, China and India can join hands, seize the historic opportunity, and work together to further advance our friendship and cooperation”.

The boundary talks were to be held in November, but were postponed over Chinese disapproval of India allowing the Dalai Lama into a Buddhist meet in New Delhi.



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April 24, 2011

Sherpa mountaineer Nawang Gombu, first to summit Mount Everest twice, dies

Sherpa mountaineer Nawang Gombu, first to summit Mount Everest twice, dies

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Sunday, April 24, 2011

Mount Everest
Image: Pavel Novak.

Sherpa mountaineer Nawang Gombu, 79, the first person to reach the summit of Mount Everest twice, died Sunday morning at his home in Darjeeling, India, located at the base of the Himalayas, his family reported.

Gombu was born in Tibet but later moved with his family to a small village in Nepal near Mount Everest.

When he was about 21, Gombu reached the South Col as the youngest member of Sir Edmund Hilary‘s team in 1953. On that expedition, Hilary and Tenzing Norgay, Gombu’s uncle, were the first to successfully scale Mount Everest.

Cquote1.svg He was not only an outstanding climber, Gombu was a fine person who guided Indian mountaineering to a greater height. Cquote2.svg

—Mohan Singh Kohli, leader of the 1965 Indian Everest expedition

Gombu set another record as the first person to reach the mountain’s summit twice, first in 1963 with Jim Whittaker on an American expedition and again in 1965 with Captain Awarae Singh Cheema on an Indian expedition.

He scaled many other Himalayan peaks including Makalu, Nanda Devi and Cho Oyu, and is credited with discovering several new mountain routes.

Gombu was one of the “Tigers of the Snow”, Sherpa mountain climbers who brought recognition to their their ethnic community in the mountains of Tibet and Nepal.

He was important in the formation of the Himalayan Mountaineering Institute (HMI), along with other Sherpas. The creation of the Institute was supported by Nehru. Gombu served as Director of Field Training there after Norgay retired from the role, eventually retiring from HMI himself after more than forty years of work for the Institute.

“He was not only an outstanding climber, Gombu was a fine person who guided Indian mountaineering to a greater height,” said Mohan Singh Kohli, a retired Navy captain and leader of the 1965 Indian expedition. “Gombu’s death left a big void in the adventure field of the country.”

For his work, Gombu received many awards, including medals from Queen Elizabeth II and the National Geographic Society, and was invited to the White House by President Kennedy.



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California teen becomes youngest to conquer Everest” — Wikinews, May 24, 2010

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February 2, 2010

China urges Obama to cancel Dalai Lama visit

China urges Obama to cancel Dalai Lama visit

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Tuesday, February 2, 2010

File photo of the Dalai Lama.
Image: Luca Galuzzi.

China has warned the United States that ties between the two countries will be strained if the US President meets the Dalai Lama. This follows the little progress achieved at “sharply divided” talks between China and the representatives of the Dalai Lama in China. Chinese Communist Party official Zhu Weiqun, speaking at a press conference to discuss the five-day visit by the representatives, said that “corresponding action” would be taken if the White House did not step down. He elaborated, stating that “it will seriously undermine the foundations of Sino-US political relations”, and that China would take “corresponding action to make relevant countries see their mistakes.”

Cquote1.svg We oppose any attempt by foreign forces to interfere in China’s internal affairs using the Dalai Lama as an excuse Cquote2.svg

—Zhu Weigun

He added, “The Dalai Lama is already 75. We hope he will face up to reality, change his stand and make a correct choice for the remainder of his life.” He went on to say that “We oppose any attempt by foreign forces to interfere in China’s internal affairs using the Dalai Lama as an excuse,” referring to the United States.

The Dalai Lama fled Tibet after an uprising rebelling against China failed in 1959. The talks between the exiled supporters & China follow a conference last month, held by Chinese leaders, to review Tibet policies.

Tibet saw major unrest in March of 2008, and riots and demonstrations are a regular occurrence, although the Chinese Government believes that its policies in Tibet are correct.

This development adds to previous tension between the United States and China, caused by issues over internet censorship and the US-Taiwan arms deal announced last week.



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November 8, 2009

Dalai Lama visits monastery despite protests from China

Filed under: India,Pages with broken file links,Tibet — admin @ 5:00 am

Dalai Lama visits monastery despite protests from China

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Sunday, November 8, 2009

India
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Tawang
Image: Windrider24584.

The Dalai Lama visited a Tibetan monastery on Sunday in Tawang in the northeast Himalayan region of Arunachal Pradesh in India, which is disputed by China and India. This is his second controversial visit this year, following a previous visit to Taiwan in August, also claimed by China.

The Chinese government has protested at the visit, accusing the Dalai Lama of trying to undermine their rule in Tibet and accusing the visit of anti-China sentiments. The Dalai Lama refutes these claims, calling the visit “non-political”.

Thousands of Buddhists welcomed the spiritual leader, who fled Tibet to live in exile in India in 1959, upon his arrival at the monastery. “We are very pleased and blessed to have His Holiness here,” said Sarwang Lama, one of the monks. Tibetan prayer flags and posters of the Nobel peace prize winner decorated the route and monks played cymbals and horns.

The region of Arunachal Pradesh is of symbolic importance to the spiritual leader; it was through here that he fled to exile fifty years ago. “There are a lot of emotions involved,” he said. “When I escaped from China in 1959, I was mentally and physically very weak […] The Chinese did not pursue us in 1959, but when I reached India they started speaking against me.”

Although this the first time the Dalai Lama has visited Tawang, it comes amidst mounting tensions between India and China over the disputed border. In the past months both countries have moved troops and there have been minor incidents, although nothing similar to the intense war which took place briefly in 1962.

The Dalai Lama remains stoic about Chinese reactions. “It is quite usual for China to step up campaigning against me wherever I go,” he said. “It is totally baseless on the part of the Chinese communist government to say that I am encouraging a separatist movement […] My visit to Tawang is non-political and aimed at promoting universal brotherhood and nothing else.”



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March 30, 2009

Chinese spy network infiltrated foreign affairs, embassies

Chinese spy network infiltrated foreign affairs, embassies

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Monday, March 30, 2009

Internet
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Canadian think tanks SecDev Group and the Munk Centre for International Studies at the University of Toronto have released findings from a 10 month investigation exposing an internet spy network based mostly in China which has hacked into computers and networks owned by government and private organizations in 103 countries.

Allegations that the Chinese government was infiltrating computers set up by the Tibetan exile community prompted the initial investigation. Following up on the leads, investigators found at least 1,295 computers belonging to a range of governments and private organizations world wide were affected, including the Tibetan exiles’ centres in Brussels, India, London, and New York.

The spy network, dubbed ‘GhostNet’, appears to have focused on Foreign Affairs ministries, embassies, and international organizations including breaking into at least one computer at NATO. 30% of the machines infected were considered high-value targets according to the report published Sunday in Information Warfare Monitor. The report details the malware used in the attacks, pointing out that it provides extensive control of the infected computer to the outside source, even to monitoring microphones or cameras attached to the machine.

Wenqi Gao, spokesman at the Chinese consulate in New York City told the New York Times that allegations of Chinese governmental involvement were “old stories” and “nonsense.”

Another report released on Sunday from Cambridge University alleges the Chinese government or a group working closely with it initiated the attacks on the Tibetan organizations. In that attack, control of an e-mail server was also achieved, giving the attackers access to all messages sent by the Dalai Lama’s supporters.



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August 6, 2008

Group claims acitivists held in China after free Tibet protests

Wednesday, August 6, 2008

At the National Musuem of China in Tiananmen Square, a clock counts down the time until the 2008 Olympics begin. Image: 吉恩.

At the National Musuem of China in Tiananmen Square, a clock counts down the time until the 2008 Olympics begin.
Image: 吉恩.

The non-profit student-led organization Students for a Free Tibet, which seeks to make Tibet a separate country from China, has claimed that some of its activists have been detained in Beijing after protesting near an Olympic stadium, holding banners such as “One World, One Dream: Free Tibet” and “Tibet Will Be Free.”

The British Embassy in Beijing is investigating these reports, which involved two Britons and two Americans. A British Embassy spokesman said that they “are in touch with the Chinese authorities and are requesting immediate consular access should this information be correct.”

Lhadon Tethong, Executive Director of Students for a Free Tibet, made a statement after the alleged action: “At this very moment, Tibetans are facing the most severe and violent repression they have seen in decades at the hands of the Chinese government, and we have taken nonviolent action at this critical time to draw the world’s attention to the crisis gripping Tibet.”

“Days before the Olympic Games begin, and as all eyes turn to China, we appeal to the world to remember that millions of Tibetans are crying out for human rights and freedom,” said the Deputy Director of the protest group. “As the Chinese leadership prepares its display of grandeur and power in Beijing, trying to convince the world of its new tolerance and openness, it is waging a ruthless campaign of repression inside Tibet.”

The American protestors have been named as Phill Bartell from New Jersey and Tirian Mink from Oregon. The British protesters have been named as Iain Thom and Lucy Fairbrother.


Sources

  • Press Release: “Free Tibet Protest Outside Bird’s Nest Stadium In Beijing”. Students for a Free Tibet, August 6, 2008
  • “‘Britons’ held in Beijing protest”. BBC News Online, August 6, 2008
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Group claims activists held in China after free Tibet protests

Group claims activists held in China after free Tibet protests

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Wednesday, August 6, 2008

Freshly unfurled banner on a light-pole directly outside Beijing National Stadium (the “Bird’s Nest”)
Image: Students for a Free Tibet.

The non-profit student-led organization Students for a Free Tibet, which seeks to make Tibet a separate country from China, has claimed that some of its activists have been detained in Beijing after protesting near an Olympic stadium, holding banners such as “One World, One Dream: Free Tibet” and “Tibet Will Be Free.”

The British Embassy in Beijing is investigating these reports, which involved two Britons and two Americans. A British Embassy spokesman said that they “are in touch with the Chinese authorities and are requesting immediate consular access should this information be correct.”

Lhadon Tethong, Executive Director of Students for a Free Tibet, made a statement after the alleged action: “At this very moment, Tibetans are facing the most severe and violent repression they have seen in decades at the hands of the Chinese government, and we have taken nonviolent action at this critical time to draw the world’s attention to the crisis gripping Tibet.”

“Days before the Olympic Games begin, and as all eyes turn to China, we appeal to the world to remember that millions of Tibetans are crying out for human rights and freedom,” said the Deputy Director of the protest group. “As the Chinese leadership prepares its display of grandeur and power in Beijing, trying to convince the world of its new tolerance and openness, it is waging a ruthless campaign of repression inside Tibet.”

The American protestors have been named as Phill Bartell from New Jersey and Tirian Mink from Oregon. The British protesters have been named as Iain Thom and Lucy Fairbrother.



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July 3, 2008

President Bush plans to attend opening of Beijing Olympics

President Bush plans to attend opening of Beijing Olympics

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The opening ceremony will take place in Beijing National Stadium.

Thursday, July 3, 2008

United States President George W. Bush is scheduled to attend the opening ceremony of the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing on August 8, the White House said Thursday.

The visit will be part of an August trip to China, South Korea, and Thailand, where he will discuss issues such as bilateral relations, U.S.-Korean trade and North Korea’s nuclear program.

Human rights groups have appealed to Bush not to attend the Olympics, citing the Chinese government’s crackdown on Tibetan protesters as evidence of human rights abuse. Polish Prime Minister Donald Tusk and Czech Republic President Vaclav Klaus have said they will boycott the opening ceremony as a political protest. British Prime Minister Gordon Brown says that he will not attend the opening, but he will be at the closing.

Chinese President Hu Jintao with George W. Bush.

U.S. senator and former Presidential candidate Hillary Clinton was among a group of senators who sent Bush a letter urging him not to attend the Olympics. Presumptive Presidential nominees Barack Obama and John McCain have also weighed in. Obama wants Bush to boycott the ceremony if China doesn’t respect human rights in Tibet and pressure Sudan on the violence in Darfur, while McCain has said that if he were President, he wouldn’t attend.

Representatives of the Chinese government have begun talks with the Dalai Lama to ease tension between China and Tibet. French President Nicolas Sarkozy said earlier this week that his attendance at the Olympics will depend on the outcome of these talks.

However, Bush has previously said that he would go to the Olympics to support American athletes, not to make a political statement. “He sees this as a sporting competition,” said White House Press Secretary Dana Perino. “But at the same time, just as he will this week when he sees President Hu, he will talk to him about these important issues of human rights and especially religious freedom.”



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April 28, 2008

Journalists banned from Mount Everest

Filed under: Archived,Asia,China,Journalism,Nepal,Politics and conflicts,Tibet — admin @ 5:00 am

Journalists banned from Mount Everest – Wikinews, the free news source

Journalists banned from Mount Everest

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Monday, April 28, 2008

Mount Everest
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Journalists are no longer allowed to go any higher than base camp on Mount Everest when visiting the Nepalese side of the mountain, which is the world’s highest. This comes after new regulations from the Government of Nepal restricted access to the mountain for all journalists.

“We knew there were restrictions on video cameras and satellite phones but we’re now told even pre-recorded radio material on non-political subjects would not be allowed,” said BBC reporter Charles Haviland on the incident. This move comes after an American was forced off the mountain after being discovered with a Tibetan flag. These are not permitted on the Tibetan side of the mountain. A Nepali official aimed to justify the new restriction. “We are doing this for our friend China,” he said.

The Chinese government has already imposed similar restrictions on the Tibetan side in the mountain

Mount Everest is located in the Himalayas mountain range. It is 8,848 metres (29,029 feet) high, making it the highest mountain in the world, although not the tallest. Mauna Kea is considered the tallest mountain since it begins well below sea-level.



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