Wiki Actu en

September 3, 2010

Wikinews Shorts: September 2, 2010

Wikinews Shorts: September 2, 2010 – Wikinews, the free news source

Wikinews Shorts: September 2, 2010

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

A compilation of brief news reports for Thursday, September 2, 2010.

Create a new In brief: article; enter the title in the box below.



Shorts: Abbas, Netanyahu to meet regularly[]

Saturday, September 4, 2010

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas and Israeli Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu have agreed to meet again in 10–11 days within the region, and every two weeks thereafter, according to U.S. Middle East diplomat George Mitchell. The two leaders are engaged in the first direct talks between the nations in more than two years, hosted by Israel’s ally the United States in Washington, DC.

Sources[]

Bookmark-new.svg

In brief: Fuel tanker aground in Northwest Passage[]

Friday, September 3, 2010

No oil is reported leaking from the Woodward’s Oil fuel tanker The Nanny aground in the Northwest Passage off the coast of Nunavut. The 110 metre (360 ft) tanker was carrying 9 million liters (2.4 million gallons) of diesel fuel to remote settlements in Canada’s Arctic regions when it grounded on a sandbar. Last week the cruise ship Clipper Adventurer struck an uncharted rock in the same region, trapping 110 tourists and crew aboard for the two days it took the Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker to reach the ship. On August 27th another Woodward’s tanker, the Mokami, ran aground near Pangnirtung.

Sources[]

articleeditsources


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Wikinews Shorts: September 3, 2010/Fuel tanker aground in Northwest Passage

Wikinews Shorts: September 3, 2010/Fuel tanker aground in Northwest Passage

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, September 3, 2010

No oil is reported leaking from the Woodward’s Oil fuel tanker The Nanny aground in the Northwest Passage off the coast of Nunavut. The 110 metre (360 ft) tanker was carrying 9 million liters (2.4 million gallons) of diesel fuel to remote settlements in Canada’s Arctic regions when it grounded on a sandbar. Last week the cruise ship Clipper Adventurer struck an uncharted rock in the same region, trapping 110 tourists and crew aboard for the two days it took the Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker to reach the ship. On August 27th another Woodward’s tanker, the Mokami, ran aground near Pangnirtung.

Sources

articleeditsources


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

January 25, 2010

Inuk hunter adrift on arctic ice floe

Inuk hunter adrift on arctic ice floe – Wikinews, the free news source

Inuk hunter adrift on arctic ice floe

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
Canada
Other Canadian stories
  • 22 October 2014: One confirmed dead after shooting at National War Memorial in Ottawa
  • 3 July 2014: Indian space agency launches five foreign satellites
  • 29 June 2014: Canada wins 2014 Women’s World Wheelchair Basketball Championship
  • 28 June 2014: Germany and Canada into 2014 Women’s World Wheelchair Basketball Championships final
  • 27 June 2014: Germany, Netherlands, Canada and USA into Women’s Wheelchair Basketball Championships semi-finals
…More articles here
Location of Canada

A map showing the location of Canada

Wikinews Canada.png

To write, edit, start or view other Canada articles, see the Canada Portal

Monday, January 25, 2010

Stranded on a floe since it broke loose while he was snowmobiling across it on Friday, 39 year-old David Idlout is huddled in a tent dropped by rescue planes awaiting the arrival of a rescue helicopter that is scrambling from CFB Greenwood, Nova Scotia, the closest rescue helicopter to Resolute, Nunavut.

While many places are experiencing cold temperatures, much of the Arctic has had an unusually mild winter. Too much so for professional hunter and hunting guide Idlout, who was out checking if conditions had improved after a cold snap. The breakaway floe is just more evidence conditions are still too warm, the ice too soft.

Idlout’s survival gear included a satellite phone, and he called his wife Tracy Kalluk as soon as he became aware the floe had broken free and was drifting into the Northwest Passage. She in turn contacted local authorities in the population 252 remote village, who got in touch with the Joint Rescue Coordination Centre, based in Trenton, Ontario

The Joint Rescue Coordination Centre scrambled two Hercules aircraft which were able to drop gear to the stranded man on Friday. The floe has been moving into the water between Griffith and Cornwallis Islands, and is approximately 15 kilometres from Resolute Bay. The supplies included a tent, stove, and additional communications gear including a locator beacon.

Now well into his third night on the ice, Idlout’s rescue is expected within hours. An earlier attempt was delayed when the helicopter, after its long journey from its home base, experienced mechanical failures when trying to lift off from Resolute. Weather conditions are not helpful either, as Resolute remains under blizzard warning with poor visibility and 50 km winds. His wife is speaking with Idlout every two hours, and expects the helicopter to lift him off the ice early Monday local time.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

August 28, 2008

73M-year-old fossilized fish found in Canada

Thursday, August 28, 2008

Other Canadian stories
…More articles here
Location of Canada

A map showing the location of Canada

To write, edit, start or view other Canada articles, see the Canada Portal

Canadian Museum of Nature or Victoria Memorial Museum Building
Image: SimonP in January 2005.

Scientists of the United Kingdom-based Royal Society released a paper August 1, 2008 which studied Cretaceous era fossil finds found at the northern area of Devon Island in the 1980s. Nunavutospongia irregulara is the name of the new species of sponge found, released by Proceedings B the Royal Society’s biological research journal.

Thick bones and armour-like scales have been found that are believed to belong to a new species of fish which grew up to two meters long. Thousands of fossilized feces – termed coprolites – both small and as large as an arm have been found. Coral reef fossils, conifer wood debris, fossil wood chunks and thousands of plankton and microbes have been found both at Devon Island and Beechy Island. Beechy Island is connected to Devon Island during times of low tide.

Two areas on Devon Island about 30 kilometres apart are providing Cretaceous fossil finds, and each is kilometres in length. These areas are khaki-coloured valley greensands rich in fossil beds, which provide a peek at life 73 million years ago. During the Cretaceous Devon Island was located in a position with a warmer climate, large trees grew north of Baffin Island, and plesiosaurs, ichthyodectid fish, and sharks roamed the waters of the Arctic. Devon Island was submerged under warm water in the Cretaceous period, when the island was situated hundreds of kilometres south of its current location due to continental drift.

At the upper Kanguk Formation, the fossil finds represent offshore and near-shore sedimentary deposits on an ocean floor. The warmer temperate waters supported benthic invertebrates (organisms such as larva that live on the bottom of a water body) and large predatory vertebrates. Whereas life is currently supported by nutrients from the sea ice, Cretaceous sea life was supported by terrigenous resources from forested landscapes.

The eight-member team from the Royal Society consists of Canadian, United States and Polish researchers. The fossil specimens are held at the Canadian Museum of Nature in Ottawa on behalf of the Nunavut territorial government.


Sources

  • Randy Boswell “Arctic fossil ield yields sea serpents, shark teeth”. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, August 22, 2008
  • “Life In A Temperate Polar Sea: A Unique Taphonomic Window On The Structure Of A Late Cretaceous Arctic Marine Ecosystem”. Medical News Today, August 20, 2008
  • Dave Grant “Coral Reef Fossils – Devon Island, Canada: Plankton, Seabirds and Icebergs”. Brookdale Community College, August 2006
  • Karen Chin, John Bloch, Justin Tweet, Jaelyn Eberle, Stephen Cumbaa. Benthic-pelagic coupling in the upper Cretaceous high arctic; evidence from a suite of unusual polar coprolites. Geological Society of America, 2004; Abstracts with Programs, Vol. 36, No. 5: 380.


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

August 27, 2008

Canadian military exercise NANOOK 2008 travels through uncharted waters

Canadian military exercise NANOOK 2008 travels through uncharted waters

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, August 27, 2008

Canada
Other Canadian stories
  • 22 October 2014: One confirmed dead after shooting at National War Memorial in Ottawa
  • 3 July 2014: Indian space agency launches five foreign satellites
  • 29 June 2014: Canada wins 2014 Women’s World Wheelchair Basketball Championship
  • 28 June 2014: Germany and Canada into 2014 Women’s World Wheelchair Basketball Championships final
  • 27 June 2014: Germany, Netherlands, Canada and USA into Women’s Wheelchair Basketball Championships semi-finals
…More articles here
Location of Canada

A map showing the location of Canada

Wikinews Canada.png

To write, edit, start or view other Canada articles, see the Canada Portal

The Honourable Peter MacKay Defence Minister and Minister of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency attended the official launch of ceremonies. This image is a file photo of Peter MacKay’s visit to Brazil.
Image: Elza Fiúza.

Operation NANOOK 2008 was held from August 11 to August 25 by the Canadian Forces for the purpose of conducting mock emergency rescue operations for potential maritime disasters in the northeastern Canadian Arctic waters.

Two Canadian navy ships and two airforce planes, a CC-138 Twin Otter and a CP-140 Aurora, took part in the exercises in the Canada’s Arctic. The HMCS Toronto and the Canadian Coast Guard ship Pierre Radisson travelled along the Hudson Strait. The Operation extended to Davis Strait, and Frobisher Bay during the annual NANOOK Operation. There have been 18 such humanitarian operations since 2002. As more Arctic ice melts, the ships sail through uncharted waters. Emergency response times were tested for such potential disasters as oil spills, or rescue operations such as responding to cruise ship emergencies.

General Walter Natynczyk, Canada’s chief of Defence staff, the Honourable Peter MacKay, Defence Minister as well as Minister of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, and Steven Fletcher, Member of Parliament for Charleswood–St. James–Assiniboia and Parliamentary Secretary for Health, flew to Iqaluit, Nunavut to officially launch the exercise on August 19, 2008 and observe the process.

In addition to the military exercises, Veterans Affairs Canada held a commemorative event onboard the HMCS Toronto to honour the 55th Anniversary of the Cease Fire in Korea, the 65th Anniversary of the Battle of the Atlantic, and the start of the Last 100 days of the First World War. The inaugural ceremonies were held during Community Day activities in the capital city of Iqaluit, followed by the public panel discussion held on Saturday. The community day ceremonies were organized by participants in Operation NANOOK 2008. The public ceremonies received neither Nunavut politicians nor Inuit leaders.



Source

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Operation NANOOK 2008 travels through uncharted waters

Wednesday, August 27, 2008

Other Canadian stories
…More articles here
Location of Canada

A map showing the location of Canada

Portal:Canada
To write, edit, start or view other Canada articles, see the Canada Portal
the Honourable Peter MacKay Defence Minister and Minister of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency attended the official launch of ceremonies. This image is a file photo of Peter MacKay's visit to Brazil. Image: Elza Fiúza.

the Honourable Peter MacKay Defence Minister and Minister of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency attended the official launch of ceremonies. This image is a file photo of Peter MacKay’s visit to Brazil.
Image: Elza Fiúza.

Operation NANOOK 2008 was held from August 11, 2008 through August 25, 2008 by the Canadian National Defence and the Canadian Forces for the purpose of conducting mock emergency rescue operations for potential maritime disasters in the Canadian eastern arctic waters.

Two Canadian navy ships and two airforce planes, CC-138 Twin Otter and CP-140 Aurora, took part in the exercises in the Canada’s northeastern arctic waters. The HMCS Toronto and the Canadian Coast Guard ship Pierre Radisson travelled along the Hudson Strait. The Operation extended to Davis Strait, and Frobisher Bay during the annual NANOOK Operation. There have been 18 such humanitarian operations since 2002. As more Arctic ice melts, the ships sail through uncharted waters. Emergency response times were tested for such potential disasters as oil spills, or rescue operations such as responding to cruise ship emergencies.

General Walter Natynczyk, Canada’s chief of Defence staff, the Honourable Peter MacKay, Defence Minister as well as Minister of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, and Steven Fletcher, Member of Parliament for Charleswood–St. James–Assiniboia and Parliamentary Secretary for Health, flew to Iqaluit, Nunavut to officially launch the exercise on August 19, 2008 and observe the process.

In addition to the military exercises, Veterans Affairs Canada held a commemorative event onboard the HMCS Toronto to honour the 55th Anniversary of the Cease Fire in Korea, the 65th Anniversary of the Battle of the Atlantic, and the start of the Last 100 days of the First World War. The inaugural ceremonies were held during Community Day activities in the capital city of Iqaluit, followed by the public panel discussion held on Saturday. The community day ceremonies were organized by participants in Operation NANOOK 2008. The public ceremonies received neither Nunavut politicians nor Inuit leaders.

Source

  • “Ambulances, helicopters buzz around Iqaluit as Operation NANOOK wraps up”. CBC News, August 25, 2008
  • Andrew Mayeda “DND/CF”. National Defence and the Canadian Forces, August 19, 2008
  • “Media Advisory: Canadian Forces Launch Operation NANOOK 2008”. MSNBC Wire Services – msnbc.com, Aug. 19, 2008
  • “Fletcher Attends Launch Of Operation NANOOK 2008”. Charleswood–St. James–Assiniboia, Aug. 19, 2008
  • “Calendar of Events – Veterans Affairs Canada”. The Canadian Press, August 19, 2008
  • Bob Weber “Military, civilian agencies practise for maritime disasters in Arctic manoeuvres”. The Canadian Press, August 17, 2008
  • “CTV.ca”. The Canadian Press, Aug. 16 2008
  • “NationTalk – Canadian Forces and Partners operate in the Eastern Arctic – General – Native Newswire”. Media Advisory NationTalk, August 6, 2008
  • “NANOOK of the North”. The Canadian Press, July 24, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Canada invests in Arctic projects

Wednesday, August 27, 2008

Other Canadian stories
…More articles here
Location of Canada

A map showing the location of Canada

Portal:Canada
To write, edit, start or view other Canada articles, see the Canada Portal
Honourable Stephen Harper Prime Minister is expected to make 2 announcements between August 26, to August 29, 2008 while visiting Inuvik. This image is a file photo Image: SFont.

Honourable Stephen Harper Prime Minister is expected to make 2 announcements between August 26, to August 29, 2008 while visiting Inuvik. This image is a file photo
Image: SFont.

Canada’s seafloor mapping mission is underway as of August 21, 2008 ending October 2 if the waters remain ice-free. 2009 will be the third season of research. Future expeditions are planned for the Lomonosov and Alpha ridges to show bedrock connections between the seabed and Ellesmere Island. Besides the C$34 committed to Verhoef’s Polar Continental Shelf Project, Stephen Harper, Prime Minister of Canada, announced August 26, 2008 that the Canadian government is committed to spending C$100 million for geomapping of northern oil, gas and mineral resources.

Climate research and seafloor  mapping is underway in the Beaufort Sea by Dr. Jacob Verhoef and several other countries. This image is a file photo Image: Geo Swan.

Climate research and seafloor mapping is underway in the Beaufort Sea by Dr. Jacob Verhoef and several other countries. This image is a file photo
Image: Geo Swan.

Chinese, German, U.S., Japanese icebreakers are all gathering geological data and conducting climate research. Dr. Jacob Verhoef, Director Bedford Institute of Oceanography, is heading Canada’s project aboard Coast Guard icebreaker Louis S. St. Laurent. The U.S. Coast Guard cutter Healy offered to break ice for the Canadian project. The Xuelong or Snow Dragon is the icebreaker from China which entered the Canada Basin near Beaufort Sea. Polarstern, the German researcher’s icebreaker will meet with Canadian scientists in the Beaufort Sea. Besides strengthening Canada’s sovereignty, Prime Minister Stephen Harper supports

protecting our environmental heritage, promoting economic and social development, and improving and devolving governance, so that northerners have greater control over their destinies.

– Throne Speech

Five nations attended the Greenland summit last May. The Illulissat Declaration was signed by Danish, Canadian, Russian, Norwegian and American government officials. The polar treaty de-escalated tensions as all nations agreed to follow United Nations regulations in dividing sea-floor territory. All nations agreed also to co-operate on developing environmental regulations, security, scientific research, search and rescue, transportation and tourism issues. The Canadian and Danish governments are collaborating in a program named LORITA-1 (Lomonosov Ridge Test of Appurtenance) to conduct seabed surveys of the Lomonosov Ridge. Under this collaboration, disputes have been set aside regarding ownership of Hans Island, and a section of the Lincoln Sea between the Queen Charlotte Islands and Greenland. Russia as well as Canada and Denmark are preparing reports compliant to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) regarding sea floor mapping. This seafloor mapping endeavour will show which undersea territories are linked geologically with either its mainland or Arctic Islands. The Canadian research will cover the Beaufort Sea of the western Arctic, the Lomonosov Ridge of the eastern Arctic and the Alpha Ridge of the central Arctic.

Plate reconstructions that require the Lomonsov Ridge to be attached to the North American and Greenland plates are consistent with our data

– Trine Dahl-Jensen, Ruth Jackson, Deping Chian, John Shield, and Gordon Oakley of the Canadian Danish study

The research entitled Crustal Structure from the Lincoln Sea to the Lomonsov Ridge, Arctic Ocean, was presented at the The 33rd International Geological Congress, Oslo 2008 (August 5-14, 2008). The findings are also submitted to the 2009 Journal of Geophysical Research according to Dr. Jacob Verhoef, Geoscientist.

The United States and Canadian governments are also cooperating on defining the Arctic ocean continental shelf. Canada uses specialized seismic systems to measure the thickness of seabed sediments, and the United States uses a High resolution bathymetric system that shows the contours of the ocean floor. United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) traditionally holds that countries have ownership of a 370 kilometer coastal zone for economic development unless proof can be shown that the seabed area is a coastal extension to the country. Canada has until 2013 to offer their submission to UNCLOS. Russia ratified UNCLOS in 1997, subsequently submitting a land claim in respect to the Lomonosov ridge to the United Nations in 2001 which was rejected as not substantiated with scientific evidence. The United States has not ratified UNCLOS at all. The triangular area in the Beaufort Sea, 12,000 km square, west of the Canadian arctic islands, and north of Alaska is not to be studied during this mapping expedition.

Greg Poelzer, associate professor of Political Studies U o S and Peter MacKay, Defence Minister boarded the HMCS Toronto near Iqaluit. This image is a file photo Image: Technicalglitch.

Greg Poelzer, associate professor of Political Studies U o S and Peter MacKay, Defence Minister boarded the HMCS Toronto near Iqaluit. This image is a file photo
Image: Technicalglitch.

Greg Poelzer, associate professor of Political Studies University of Saskatchewan with expertise on circumpolar affairs and Northern politics, and Peter MacKay, Defence Minister and Minister of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, boarded the HMCS Toronto near Iqaluit August 22 and August 23. Greg Poelzer was the founding Dean of Undergraduate Studies for the University of the Arctic, and co-author (with Ken Coates, P. Whitney Lackenbauer, and Bill Morrison) of the soon to be released book, Arctic Front, Defending Canada in the Far North. Poelzer will observe the Canadian Forces (CF) and Department of National Defence roles and capabilities. Poelzer will also have the opportunity to see federal official relations and policy response to new challenges. Operation NANNY a Canadian Armed Forces venture aboard HMCS Toronto occurred August 19, 2008 and concluded August 26, 2008. Operation NANOOK 2008‘s operation to prepare for disaster relief which overlapped Operation NANNY. UArctic was established in June of 2001 is a network of 110 Canadian, Danish, Finnish, Icelandic, Norwegian, Russian, Swedish and American universities and colleges. The European Union, Japan Norway, Russia, Denmark, and the United States have increased interest in the Arctic. Canada believes the Northwest Passage is a territorial waterway of Canada, yet others feel that the Northwest Passage is an international strait.

the Honourable Peter MacKay Defence Minister and Minister of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency was onboard the HMCS Toronto with U of S associate professor of Political Studies, Greg Poelzer during Operation NANNY and Operation NANOOK. This image is a file photo of Peter MacKay's visit to Brazil. Image: Elza Fiúza.

the Honourable Peter MacKay Defence Minister and Minister of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency was onboard the HMCS Toronto with U of S associate professor of Political Studies, Greg Poelzer during Operation NANNY and Operation NANOOK. This image is a file photo of Peter MacKay’s visit to Brazil.
Image: Elza Fiúza.

Ice sheets 20 kilometers square broke off the shelf on Ward Hunt Island near Ellesmere Island at the end of July 2008 due to strong south winds. The Ward Hunt Shelf measures about 401 kilometers square. The ice shelf at Ellesmere Island was as large as 9,065 kilometers square, and is now broken into 5 smaller shelves which combined are almost 1,036 kilometers square. The ice break up is resulting in more navigable waters and more transit activity. In 2007, the ice cover was 14M kilometers square shrinking to just over 4M kilometers square. This spring the 14M kilometers square of ice shrank to 6.5M kilometers square. 1M kilometers square of ice shrank between August 1 and August 10, 2008 due to windy stormy conditions.

a navigable corridor surely exists now as one can avoid the various ice floes.

– Luc Desjardins, Canadian Ice Service forecaster

Commander General Victor Renuart, head of U.S. Northern Command and NORAD, and the Canadian U.S. North American Aerospace Defense Command is aware of the increased transit in the Arctic waters. This image is a file photo Image: United States Federal Government .

Commander General Victor Renuart, head of U.S. Northern Command and NORAD, and the Canadian U.S. North American Aerospace Defense Command is aware of the increased transit in the Arctic waters. This image is a file photo
Image: United States Federal Government .

Commander General Victor Renuart, head of U.S. Northern Command and NORAD, and the Canadian U.S. North American Aerospace Defense Command is aware of the increased transit in the Arctic waters. The U.S. white house is preparing an Arctic policy. Prime Minister Stephen Harper proposed in 2007 to construct an Arctic combat training centre in the Northwest Passage area. Currently new funding is in place for the Iqaluit| Canadian Rangers junior members. The Canadian Rangers is a military reservist unit which monitors Arctic outposts for the Canadian government. In the early morning hours of July 31, 2008, an explosion was reported by an Inuit member of the Canadian Rangers. The explosion occurred near the Borden Peninusla on the northwest coast of Baffin island. Department of National Defence DND’s Joint Task Force Northern headquarters knew of no activity in the area other than an Inuit hunting party. The RCMP’s Operation Nunakput sent over Aurora aircraft. Parks Canada sent out a boat from Sirmilik National Park located on Bylot Island.

Enhancements of the maritime infrastructure, inspection stations, and monitoring of shipping and sea traffic vehicles in the Northern Sea Route are underway. The Northern Canada Traffic Regulation System, (NORDREG) is run by Marine Communications and Traffic Services (MCTS). The Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) has the

legislative authority to provide services for the safe, economical and efficient movement of ships in Canadian waters

– Oceans Act section 41

Environment Canada’s Atmospheric Environment Service (AES) offers the Canadian Ice Service. Ship related impacts, safety of ships, life and property and the marine environment is under the mandate of Marine Safety, the National Authority. The Arctic Ice Regime Shipping System works in conjunction with the NORDREG system. The Canadian Arctic Night and Day Imaging Surveillance System, CANDISS, has been established to secure the Northwest passageway between Devon Island and Baffin Island. RADARSAT-2 is a new Canadian satellite system which provides polarimetric data which provides information regarding ice edge detection, glacier termini, ice types, as well as leads and open water or ship navigation and safety. Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced a new deep water naval port to be constructed at Nanisivik, open the military training center located at Resolute Bay, purchase a dozen transport planes, 8 Arctic patrol vessels and another icebreaker, upgrade the Aurora surveillance planes, and test surface and underwater sensors. The crew of the Franklin Expedition of 1845 perished after their ships became icebound in Victoria Strait near King William Island in the Canadian Arctic.

Map of Franklin's lost expedition.  Parks Canada is searching for the lost ships from the Franklin expedition.  This image is a file photo Image: Finetooth, Kennonv, U.S. Central Intelligence Agency.

Map of Franklin’s lost expedition. Parks Canada is searching for the lost ships from the Franklin expedition. This image is a file photo
Image: Finetooth, Kennonv, U.S. Central Intelligence Agency.

Parks Canada is searching for the lost ships from the Franklin expedition. Robert Grenier, Parks Canada underwater archeologist, and Louie Kamoukak, Inuit historian are on a six week search aboard the Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker Sir Wilred Laurier. Grenier has previously discovered at Red Bay, Labrador two 16th century whaling ships. This project will cover between 400 to 800 kilometers square encompassing the Victoria Strait southern edge, Queen Maud Gulf eastern edge, and around the O’Reilly and Kirkwall Islands near the Nunavut northern coastline.

Prime Minister Stephen Harper is spending three days between August 26, to August 29, 2008, visiting Inuvik, N.W.T., Tuktoyaktuk, N.W.T., and Dawson City, Yukon. Floyd Roland, Premier of the North West Territories has requested a Mackenzie Valley Highway providing a transportation corridor linking the Northern territories with the provinces of Canada. The Prime Minister is expected to make two announcements.

Source

  • Andrew Mayeda “New Arctic protection rules could be tough sell abroad: Harper”. Canwest News Service, August 27, 2008
  • “Gov’t announces cash for geo-mapping Arctic”. The StarPhoenix, August 27, 2008
  • “Harper lands in Inuvik for northern tour”. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, August 27, 2008
  • Randy Boswell “Harper looks to reap Arctic bounty”. The Vancouver Sun, August 26, 2008
  • “Canada’s Arctic sovereignty bid begins in ‘busy place'”. National Post, August 25, 2008
  • Bob Weber “Harper returns to North”. The Globe and Mail, August 24, 2008
  • Randy Boswell “Melting Beaufort Sea a hotbed of international activity”. The StarPhoenix, August 21, 2008
  • Andrew Mayeda and Randy Boswell “Arctic Ambitions: Canada’s stake in the North”. Times-Colonist (Victoria), August 17, 2008
  • Randy Boswell “Canada embarks on search for Franklin’s lost ships”. The StarPhoenix, August 16, 2008
  • Randy Boswell “Arctic Ambitions: Canada’s stake in the North”. Times-Colonist (Victoria), August 16, 2008
  • Randy Boswell “Parks Canada to lead new search for Franklin ships”. Canwest News Service, August 15, 2008
  • Randy Boswell “Northwest Passage navigable again this summer”. The StarPhoenix, August 14, 2008
  • “Harper heading north of 60 again for sovereignty swing”. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, August 13, 2008
  • “Canada, US team up in key Arctic study”. The Age, August 12, 2008
  • Ed Struzik “Military probes mystery blast in Arctic”. Canwest News Service, August 8, 2008
  • Randy Boswell “Research quietly backs Canada’s claims on Arctic sovereignty”. Canwest News Service, August 7, 2008
  • David Ljunggren “Giant chunks break off Canadian ice shelf”. Canwest News Service, July 30, 2008
  • “U of S professor to visit Canadian Arctic during Operation NANOOK 2008”. University of Saskatchewan, 2008
  • “Science cements Arctic claim, Russia says; Disputed Lomonosov Ridge key to claiming vast untapped resources”. University of Alberta, September 21, 2007
  • Randy Boswell “Danes pipe up with their own North Pole claims”. National Post, August 10, 2007
  • David Jackson “Microsoft PowerPoint – Ice diminishing Arctic 10 July07.ppt The Impact of Arctic climate change on the CCG Icebreaking program and marine transportation.”. Icebreaking Program Canadian Coast Guard, July 11, 2007
  • Randy Boswell “Russia poised to claim Arctic expanse on Canada’s doorstep”. Canwest News Service, Thursday, June 28, 2007
  • “Mapping continues along the Lomonosov Ridge”. Siku News, April 17, 2007
  • “RADARSAT-2 Information”. MacDonald Dettwiler, 1995-2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

The true north strong and free. Canada fuels strong activity in Arctic waters free of ice

Wednesday, August 27, 2008

Other Canadian stories
…More articles here
Location of Canada

A map showing the location of Canada

Portal:Canada
To write, edit, start or view other Canada articles, see the Canada Portal
Honourable Stephen Harper Prime Minister is expected to make 2 announcements between August 26, to August 29, 2008 while visiting Inuvik. This image is a file photo Image: SFont.

Honourable Stephen Harper Prime Minister is expected to make 2 announcements between August 26, to August 29, 2008 while visiting Inuvik. This image is a file photo
Image: SFont.

Canada’s seafloor mapping mission is underway as of August 21, 2008 ending October 2 if the waters remain ice-free. 2009 will be the third season of research. Future expeditions are planned for the Lomonosov and Alpha ridges to show bedrock connections between the seabed and Ellesmere Island. Besides the C$34 committed to Verhoef’s Polar Continental Shelf Project, Stephen Harper, Prime Minister of Canada, announced August 26, 2008 that the Canadian government is committed to spending C$100 million for geomapping of northern oil, gas and mineral resources.

Climate research and seafloor  mapping is underway in the Beaufort Sea by Dr. Jacob Verhoef and several other countries. This image is a file photo Image: Geo Swan.

Climate research and seafloor mapping is underway in the Beaufort Sea by Dr. Jacob Verhoef and several other countries. This image is a file photo
Image: Geo Swan.

Chinese, German, U.S., Japanese icebreakers are all gathering geological data and conducting climate research. Dr. Jacob Verhoef, Director Bedford Institute of Oceanography, is heading Canada’s project aboard Coast Guard icebreaker Louis S. St. Laurent. The U.S. Coast Guard cutter Healy offered to break ice for the Canadian project. The Xuelong or Snow Dragon is the icebreaker from China which entered the Canada Basin near Beaufort Sea. Polarstern, the German researcher’s icebreaker will meet with Canadian scientists in the Beaufort Sea. Besides strengthening Canada’s sovereignty, Prime Minister Stephen Harper supports

protecting our environmental heritage, promoting economic and social development, and improving and devolving governance, so that northerners have greater control over their destinies.

– Throne Speech

Five nations attended the Greenland summit last May. The Illulissat Declaration was signed by Danish, Canadian, Russian, Norwegian and American government officials. The polar treaty de-escalated tensions as all nations agreed to follow United Nations regulations in dividing sea-floor territory. All nations agreed also to co-operate on developing environmental regulations, security, scientific research, search and rescue, transportation and tourism issues. The Canadian and Danish governments are collaborating in a program named LORITA-1 (Lomonosov Ridge Test of Appurtenance) to conduct seabed surveys of the Lomonosov Ridge. Under this collaboration, disputes have been set aside regarding ownership of Hans Island, and a section of the Lincoln Sea between the Queen Charlotte Islands and Greenland. Russia as well as Canada and Denmark are preparing reports compliant to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) regarding sea floor mapping. This seafloor mapping endeavour will show which undersea territories are linked geologically with either its mainland or Arctic Islands. The Canadian research will cover the Beaufort Sea of the western Arctic, the Lomonosov Ridge of the eastern Arctic and the Alpha Ridge of the central Arctic.

Plate reconstructions that require the Lomonsov Ridge to be attached to the North American and Greenland plates are consistent with our data

– Trine Dahl-Jensen, Ruth Jackson, Deping Chian, John Shield, and Gordon Oakley of the Canadian Danish study

The research entitled Crustal Structure from the Lincoln Sea to the Lomonsov Ridge, Arctic Ocean, was presented at the The 33rd International Geological Congress, Oslo 2008 (August 5-14, 2008). The findings are also submitted to the 2009 Journal of Geophysical Research according to Dr. Jacob Verhoef, Geoscientist.

The United States and Canadian governments are also cooperating on defining the Arctic ocean continental shelf. Canada uses specialized seismic systems to measure the thickness of seabed sediments, and the United States uses a High resolution bathymetric system that shows the contours of the ocean floor. United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) traditionally holds that countries have ownership of a 370 kilometer coastal zone for economic development unless proof can be shown that the seabed area is a coastal extension to the country. Canada has until 2013 to offer their submission to UNCLOS. Russia ratified UNCLOS in 1997, subsequently submitting a land claim in respect to the Lomonosov ridge to the United Nations in 2001 which was rejected as not substantiated with scientific evidence. The United States has not ratified UNCLOS at all. The triangular area in the Beaufort Sea, 12,000 km square, west of the Canadian arctic islands, and north of Alaska is not to be studied during this mapping expedition.

Greg Poelzer, associate professor of Political Studies U o S and Peter MacKay, Defence Minister boarded the HMCS Toronto near Iqaluit. This image is a file photo Image: Technicalglitch.

Greg Poelzer, associate professor of Political Studies U o S and Peter MacKay, Defence Minister boarded the HMCS Toronto near Iqaluit. This image is a file photo
Image: Technicalglitch.

Greg Poelzer, associate professor of Political Studies University of Saskatchewan with expertise on circumpolar affairs and Northern politics, and Peter MacKay, Defence Minister and Minister of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, boarded the HMCS Toronto near Iqaluit August 22 and August 23. Greg Poelzer was the founding Dean of Undergraduate Studies for the University of the Arctic, and co-author (with Ken Coates, P. Whitney Lackenbauer, and Bill Morrison) of the soon to be released book, Arctic Front, Defending Canada in the Far North. Poelzer will observe the Canadian Forces (CF) and Department of National Defence roles and capabilities. Poelzer will also have the opportunity to see federal official relations and policy response to new challenges. Operation NANNY a Canadian Armed Forces venture aboard HMCS Toronto occurred August 19, 2008 and concluded August 26, 2008. Operation NANOOK 2008‘s operation to prepare for disaster relief which overlapped Operation NANNY. UArctic was established in June of 2001 is a network of 110 Canadian, Danish, Finnish, Icelandic, Norwegian, Russian, Swedish and American universities and colleges. The European Union, Japan Norway, Russia, Denmark, and the United States have increased interest in the Arctic. Canada believes the Northwest Passage is a territorial waterway of Canada, yet others feel that the Northwest Passage is an international strait.

the Honourable Peter MacKay Defence Minister and Minister of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency was onboard the HMCS Toronto with U of S associate professor of Political Studies, Greg Poelzer during Operation NANNY and Operation NANOOK. This image is a file photo of Peter MacKay's visit to Brazil. Image: Elza Fiúza.

the Honourable Peter MacKay Defence Minister and Minister of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency was onboard the HMCS Toronto with U of S associate professor of Political Studies, Greg Poelzer during Operation NANNY and Operation NANOOK. This image is a file photo of Peter MacKay’s visit to Brazil.
Image: Elza Fiúza.

Ice sheets 20 kilometers square broke off the shelf on Ward Hunt Island near Ellesmere Island at the end of July 2008 due to strong south winds. The Ward Hunt Shelf measures about 401 kilometers square. The ice shelf at Ellesmere Island was as large as 9,065 kilometers square, and is now broken into 5 smaller shelves which combined are almost 1,036 kilometers square. The ice break up is resulting in more navigable waters and more transit activity. In 2007, the ice cover was 14M kilometers square shrinking to just over 4M kilometers square. This spring the 14M kilometers square of ice shrank to 6.5M kilometers square. 1M kilometers square of ice shrank between August 1 and August 10, 2008 due to windy stormy conditions.

a navigable corridor surely exists now as one can avoid the various ice floes.

– Luc Desjardins, Canadian Ice Service forecaster

Commander General Victor Renuart, head of U.S. Northern Command and NORAD, and the Canadian U.S. North American Aerospace Defense Command is aware of the increased transit in the Arctic waters. This image is a file photo Image: United States Federal Government .

Commander General Victor Renuart, head of U.S. Northern Command and NORAD, and the Canadian U.S. North American Aerospace Defense Command is aware of the increased transit in the Arctic waters. This image is a file photo
Image: United States Federal Government .

Commander General Victor Renuart, head of U.S. Northern Command and NORAD, and the Canadian U.S. North American Aerospace Defense Command is aware of the increased transit in the Arctic waters. The U.S. white house is preparing an Arctic policy. Prime Minister Stephen Harper proposed in 2007 to construct an Arctic combat training centre in the Northwest Passage area. Currently new funding is in place for the Iqaluit| Canadian Rangers junior members. The Canadian Rangers is a military reservist unit which monitors Arctic outposts for the Canadian government. In the early morning hours of July 31, 2008, an explosion was reported by an Inuit member of the Canadian Rangers. The explosion occurred near the Borden Peninusla on the northwest coast of Baffin island. Department of National Defence DND’s Joint Task Force Northern headquarters knew of no activity in the area other than an Inuit hunting party. The RCMP’s Operation Nunakput sent over Aurora aircraft. Parks Canada sent out a boat from Sirmilik National Park located on Bylot Island.

Enhancements of the maritime infrastructure, inspection stations, and monitoring of shipping and sea traffic vehicles in the Northern Sea Route are underway. The Northern Canada Traffic Regulation System, (NORDREG) is run by Marine Communications and Traffic Services (MCTS). The Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) has the

legislative authority to provide services for the safe, economical and efficient movement of ships in Canadian waters

– Oceans Act section 41

Environment Canada’s Atmospheric Environment Service (AES) offers the Canadian Ice Service. Ship related impacts, safety of ships, life and property and the marine environment is under the mandate of Marine Safety, the National Authority. The Arctic Ice Regime Shipping System works in conjunction with the NORDREG system. The Canadian Arctic Night and Day Imaging Surveillance System, CANDISS, has been established to secure the Northwest passageway between Devon Island and Baffin Island. RADARSAT-2 is a new Canadian satellite system which provides polarimetric data which provides information regarding ice edge detection, glacier termini, ice types, as well as leads and open water or ship navigation and safety. Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced a new deep water naval port to be constructed at Nanisivik, open the military training center located at Resolute Bay, purchase a dozen transport planes, 8 Arctic patrol vessels and another icebreaker, upgrade the Aurora surveillance planes, and test surface and underwater sensors. The crew of the Franklin Expedition of 1845 perished after their ships became icebound in Victoria Strait near King William Island in the Canadian Arctic.

Map of Franklin's lost expedition.  Parks Canada is searching for the lost ships from the Franklin expedition.  This image is a file photo Image: Finetooth, Kennonv, U.S. Central Intelligence Agency.

Map of Franklin’s lost expedition. Parks Canada is searching for the lost ships from the Franklin expedition. This image is a file photo
Image: Finetooth, Kennonv, U.S. Central Intelligence Agency.

Parks Canada is searching for the lost ships from the Franklin expedition. Robert Grenier, Parks Canada underwater archeologist, and Louie Kamoukak, Inuit historian are on a six week search aboard the Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker Sir Wilred Laurier. Grenier has previously discovered at Red Bay, Labrador two 16th century whaling ships. This project will cover between 400 to 800 kilometers square encompassing the Victoria Strait southern edge, Queen Maud Gulf eastern edge, and around the O’Reilly and Kirkwall Islands near the Nunavut northern coastline.

Prime Minister Stephen Harper is spending three days between August 26, to August 29, 2008, visiting Inuvik, N.W.T., Tuktoyaktuk, N.W.T., and Dawson City, Yukon. Floyd Roland, Premier of the North West Territories has requested a Mackenzie Valley Highway providing a transportation corridor linking the Northern territories with the provinces of Canada. The Prime Minister is expected to make two announcements. In Tuktoyaktuk Harper declared on August 27, 2008, that it is now mandatory and not voluntary that any large ships sailing into Canada’s Arctic waters to make a report to the Canadian Coast Guard. The C$16.2-billion 1,200-kilometre long Mackenzie Valley natural gas pipeline is a government priority which will enable further infrastructure programs such as additional ports and highways.

Source

  • “New roads, port for N.W.T. hinge on pipeline: Harper”. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, August 27, 2008
  • Andrew Mayeda “New Arctic protection rules could be tough sell abroad: Harper”. Canwest News Service, August 27, 2008
  • “Gov’t announces cash for geo-mapping Arctic”. The StarPhoenix, August 27, 2008
  • “Harper lands in Inuvik for northern tour”. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, August 27, 2008
  • Randy Boswell “Harper looks to reap Arctic bounty”. The Vancouver Sun, August 26, 2008
  • Bob Weber “Harper returns to North”. The Globe and Mail, August 24, 2008
  • Randy Boswell “Canada’s Arctic sovereignty bid begins in ‘busy place'”. National Post, August 22, 2008
  • Randy Boswell “Melting Beaufort Sea a hotbed of international activity”. The StarPhoenix, August 21, 2008
  • Andrew Mayeda and Randy Boswell “Arctic Ambitions: Canada’s stake in the North”. Times-Colonist (Victoria), August 17, 2008
  • Randy Boswell “Canada embarks on search for Franklin’s lost ships”. The StarPhoenix, August 16, 2008
  • Randy Boswell “Arctic Ambitions: Canada’s stake in the North”. Times-Colonist (Victoria), August 16, 2008
  • Randy Boswell “Parks Canada to lead new search for Franklin ships”. Canwest News Service, August 15, 2008
  • Randy Boswell “Northwest Passage navigable again this summer”. The StarPhoenix, August 14, 2008
  • “Harper heading north of 60 again for sovereignty swing”. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, August 13, 2008
  • “Canada, US team up in key Arctic study”. The Age, August 12, 2008
  • Ed Struzik “Military probes mystery blast in Arctic”. Canwest News Service, August 8, 2008
  • Randy Boswell “Research quietly backs Canada’s claims on Arctic sovereignty”. Canwest News Service, August 7, 2008
  • David Ljunggren “Giant chunks break off Canadian ice shelf”. Canwest News Service, July 30, 2008
  • “U of S professor to visit Canadian Arctic during Operation NANOOK 2008”. University of Saskatchewan, 2008
  • “Science cements Arctic claim, Russia says; Disputed Lomonosov Ridge key to claiming vast untapped resources”. University of Alberta, September 21, 2007
  • Randy Boswell “Danes pipe up with their own North Pole claims”. National Post, August 10, 2007
  • David Jackson “Microsoft PowerPoint – Ice diminishing Arctic 10 July07.ppt The Impact of Arctic climate change on the CCG Icebreaking program and marine transportation.”. Icebreaking Program Canadian Coast Guard, July 11, 2007
  • Randy Boswell “Russia poised to claim Arctic expanse on Canada’s doorstep”. Canwest News Service, Thursday, June 28, 2007
  • “Mapping continues along the Lomonosov Ridge”. Siku News, April 17, 2007
  • “RADARSAT-2 Information”. MacDonald Dettwiler, 1995-2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Ramifications of Arctic ice melting. International icebreakers collect geological data and conduct climate research.

Wednesday, August 27, 2008

Other Canadian stories
…More articles here
Location of Canada

A map showing the location of Canada

Portal:Canada
To write, edit, start or view other Canada articles, see the Canada Portal
Beaufort Sea-  Canadian, Chinese, German, U.S., Japanese icebreakers are all gathering geological data and conducting climate research  This image is a file photo Image: M.Minderhoud.

Beaufort Sea– Canadian, Chinese, German, U.S., Japanese icebreakers are all gathering geological data and conducting climate research This image is a file photo
Image: M.Minderhoud.

Canadian, Chinese, German, U.S., Japanese icebreakers are all gathering geological data and conducting climate research. Canada’s seafloor mapping mission is underway as of August 21, 2008 ending October 2 if the waters remain ice-free. 2009 will be the third season of research. Future expeditions are planned for the Lomonosov and Alpha ridges to show bedrock connections between the seabed and Ellesmere Island. Besides the C$34 committed to Verhoef’s Polar Continental Shelf Project, Stephen Harper, Prime Minister of Canada, announced August 26, 2008 that the Canadian government is committed to spending C$100 million for geomapping of northern oil, gas and mineral resources. One a visit to Nunavut and the Northwest Territories, Stephen Harper announced constructions of a C$16.2-billion 1,200-kilometre long Mackenzie Valley natural gas pipeline will enable further infrastructure programs such as additional ports and highways. Indigenous peoples in the arctic lands form a minority except in Canada and Greenland. They are therefore, particularly vulnerable to immigration and settlement due to resource development. Harper also announced that the 200 nautical mile zone extending from Canada’s shores pollution free with firmer environmental regulations.

The permafrost region store more top soil which have not decomposted than previously estimated.  Image: NSIDC.

The permafrost region store more top soil which have not decomposted than previously estimated.
Image: NSIDC.

Ice sheets 20 kilometers square broke off the shelf on Ward Hunt Island near Ellesmere Island at the end of July 2008 due to strong south winds. The Ward Hunt Shelf measures about 401 kilometers square. The ice shelf at Ellesmere Island was as large as 9,065 kilometers square, and is now broken into 5 smaller shelves which combined are almost 1,036 kilometers square. The ice break up is resulting in more navigable waters and more transit activity. In 2007, the ice cover was 14M kilometers square shrinking to just over 4M kilometers square. This spring the 14M kilometers square of ice shrank to 6.5M kilometers square. 1M kilometers square of ice shrank between August 1 and August 10, 2008 due to windy stormy conditions.

a navigable corridor surely exists now as one can avoid the various ice floes.

– Luc Desjardins, Canadian Ice Service forecaster

Permafrost when melting will release carbon as greenhouse gases in a process called cryoturbation Image: Hannes Grobe.

Permafrost when melting will release carbon as greenhouse gases in a process called cryoturbation
Image: Hannes Grobe.

Melting Permafrost releases carbon as greenhouse gases in a process called cryoturbation. The journal of Nature Geoscience released a new study August, 24, 2008 which states that more carbon amounts are stored than previously estimated. The freezing and cracking effects of arctic soils allows for “Frost boils” which allow topsoils to fall to deeper depths. This topsoil has not decomposed as they are in contact with the deep permafrost. Climate change will allow this soil to decompose, releasing carbon gases into the atmosphere. The Arctic ocean is also experiencing methane burps from underwater gas hydrates. Without the white polar ice cap, there is less sun reflected back, therefore the oceans are absorbing more heat, and warming faster.

permafrost polygons on the ground.Image: United States Geological Survey.

permafrost polygons on the ground.
Image: United States Geological Survey.

Chinese, German, U.S., Japanese icebreakers are all gathering geological data and conducting climate research. Dr. Jacob Verhoef, Director Bedford Institute of Oceanography, is heading Canada’s project aboard Coast Guard icebreaker Louis S. St. Laurent. The U.S. Coast Guard cutter Healy offered to break ice for the Canadian project. The Xuelong or Snow Dragon is the icebreaker from China which entered the Canada Basin near Beaufort Sea. Polarstern, the German researcher’s icebreaker will meet with Canadian scientists in the Beaufort Sea. Besides strengthening Canada’s sovereignty, Prime Minister Stephen Harper supports

protecting our environmental heritage, promoting economic and social development, and improving and devolving governance, so that northerners have greater control over their destinies.

– Throne Speech

Five nations attended the Greenland summit last May. The Illulissat Declaration was signed by Danish, Canadian, Russian, Norwegian and American government officials. The polar treaty de-escalated tensions as all nations agreed to follow United Nations regulations in dividing sea-floor territory. All nations agreed also to co-operate on developing environmental regulations, security, scientific research, search and rescue, transportation and tourism issues.

Climate research and seafloor  mapping is underway in the Beaufort Sea by Dr. Jacob Verhoef and several other countries. This image is a file photo Image: CIA World Factbook.

Climate research and seafloor mapping is underway in the Beaufort Sea by Dr. Jacob Verhoef and several other countries. This image is a file photo
Image: CIA World Factbook.

The Canadian and Danish governments are collaborating in a program named LORITA-1 (Lomonosov Ridge Test of Appurtenance) to conduct seabed surveys of the Lomonosov Ridge. Under this collaboration, disputes have been set aside regarding ownership of Hans Island, and a section of the Lincoln Sea between the Queen Charlotte Islands and Greenland. Russia as well as Canada and Denmark are preparing reports compliant to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) regarding sea floor mapping. This seafloor mapping endeavour will show which undersea territories are linked geologically with either its mainland or Arctic Islands. The Canadian research will cover the Beaufort Sea of the western Arctic, the Lomonosov Ridge of the eastern Arctic and the Alpha Ridge of the central Arctic.

Plate reconstructions that require the Lomonsov Ridge to be attached to the North American and Greenland plates are consistent with our data

– Trine Dahl-Jensen, Ruth Jackson, Deping Chian, John Shield, and Gordon Oakley of the Canadian Danish study

The research entitled Crustal Structure from the Lincoln Sea to the Lomonsov Ridge, Arctic Ocean, was presented at the The 33rd International Geological Congress, Oslo 2008 (August 5-14, 2008). The findings are also submitted to the 2009 Journal of Geophysical Research according to Dr. Jacob Verhoef, Geoscientist.

The United States and Canadian governments are also cooperating on defining the Arctic ocean continental shelf. Canada uses specialized seismic systems to measure the thickness of seabed sediments, and the United States uses a High resolution bathymetric system that shows the contours of the ocean floor. United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea (UNCLOS) traditionally holds that countries have ownership of a 370 kilometer coastal zone for economic development unless proof can be shown that the seabed area is a coastal extension to the country. Canada has until 2013 to offer their submission to UNCLOS. Russia ratified UNCLOS in 1997, subsequently submitting a land claim in respect to the Lomonosov ridge to the United Nations in 2001 which was rejected as not substantiated with scientific evidence. The United States has not ratified UNCLOS at all. The triangular area in the Beaufort Sea, 12,000 km square, west of the Canadian arctic islands, and north of Alaska is not to be studied during this mapping expedition.

Greg Poelzer, associate professor of Political Studies U o S and Peter MacKay, Defence Minister boarded the HMCS Toronto near Iqaluit. This image is a file photo Image: Technicalglitch.

Greg Poelzer, associate professor of Political Studies U o S and Peter MacKay, Defence Minister boarded the HMCS Toronto near Iqaluit. This image is a file photo
Image: Technicalglitch.

Greg Poelzer, associate professor of Political Studies University of Saskatchewan with expertise on circumpolar affairs and Northern politics, and Peter MacKay, Defence Minister and Minister of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, boarded the HMCS Toronto near Iqaluit August 22 and August 23. Greg Poelzer was the founding Dean of Undergraduate Studies for the University of the Arctic, and co-author (with Ken Coates, P. Whitney Lackenbauer, and Bill Morrison) of the soon to be released book, Arctic Front, Defending Canada in the Far North. Poelzer will observe the Canadian Forces (CF) and Department of National Defence roles and capabilities. Poelzer will also have the opportunity to see federal official relations and policy response to new challenges. Operation NANNY a Canadian Armed Forces venture aboard HMCS Toronto occurred August 19, 2008 and concluded August 26, 2008. Operation NANOOK 2008‘s operation to prepare for disaster relief which overlapped Operation NANNY. UArctic was established in June of 2001 is a network of 110 Canadian, Danish, Finnish, Icelandic, Norwegian, Russian, Swedish and American universities and colleges. The European Union, Japan Norway, Russia, Denmark, and the United States have increased interest in the Arctic. Canada believes the Northwest Passage is a territorial waterway of Canada, yet others feel that the Northwest Passage is an international strait.

Commander General Victor Renuart, head of U.S. Northern Command and NORAD, and the Canadian U.S. North American Aerospace Defense Command is aware of the increased transit in the Arctic waters. The U.S. white house is preparing an Arctic policy. Prime Minister Stephen Harper proposed in 2007 to construct an Arctic combat training centre in the Northwest Passage area. Currently new funding is in place for the Iqaluit| Canadian Rangers junior members. The Canadian Rangers is a military reservist unit which monitors Arctic outposts for the Canadian government. In the early morning hours of July 31, 2008, an explosion was reported by an Inuit member of the Canadian Rangers. The explosion occurred near the Borden Peninusla on the northwest coast of Baffin island. Department of National Defence DND’s Joint Task Force Northern headquarters knew of no activity in the area other than an Inuit hunting party. The RCMP’s Operation Nunakput sent over Aurora aircraft. Parks Canada sent out a boat from Sirmilik National Park located on Bylot Island.

Enhancements of the maritime infrastructure, inspection stations, and monitoring of shipping and sea traffic vehicles in the Northern Sea Route are underway. The Northern Canada Traffic Regulation System, (NORDREG) is run by Marine Communications and Traffic Services (MCTS). The Canadian Coast Guard (CCG) has the

legislative authority to provide services for the safe, economical and efficient movement of ships in Canadian waters

– Oceans Act section 41

Environment Canada’s Atmospheric Environment Service (AES) offers the Canadian Ice Service. Ship related impacts, safety of ships, life and property and the marine environment is under the mandate of Marine Safety, the National Authority. The Arctic Ice Regime Shipping System works in conjunction with the NORDREG system. The Canadian Arctic Night and Day Imaging Surveillance System, CANDISS, has been established to secure the Northwest passageway between Devon Island and Baffin Island. RADARSAT-2 is a new Canadian satellite system which provides polarimetric data which provides information regarding ice edge detection, glacier termini, ice types, as well as leads and open water or ship navigation and safety. Prime Minister Stephen Harper announced a new deep water naval port to be constructed at Nanisivik, open the military training center located at Resolute Bay, purchase a dozen transport planes, 8 Arctic patrol vessels and another icebreaker, upgrade the Aurora surveillance planes, and test surface and underwater sensors. The new $720-million ice breaker will be named the John G. Diefenbaker. The crew of the Franklin Expedition of 1845 perished after their ships became icebound in Victoria Strait near King William Island in the Canadian Arctic.

Map of Franklin's lost expedition.  Parks Canada is searching for the lost ships from the Franklin expedition.  This image is a file photo Image: Finetooth, Kennonv, U.S. Central Intelligence Agency.

Map of Franklin’s lost expedition. Parks Canada is searching for the lost ships from the Franklin expedition. This image is a file photo
Image: Finetooth, Kennonv, U.S. Central Intelligence Agency.

Parks Canada is searching for the lost ships from the Franklin expedition. Robert Grenier, Parks Canada underwater archeologist, and Louie Kamoukak, Inuit historian are on a six week search aboard the Canadian Coast Guard icebreaker Sir Wilred Laurier. Grenier has previously discovered at Red Bay, Labrador two 16th century whaling ships. This project will cover between 400 to 800 kilometers square encompassing the Victoria Strait southern edge, Queen Maud Gulf eastern edge, and around the O’Reilly and Kirkwall Islands near the Nunavut northern coastline.

Prime Minister Stephen Harper is spending three days between August 26, to August 29, 2008, visiting Inuvik, N.W.T., Tuktoyaktuk, N.W.T., and Dawson City, Yukon. Floyd Roland, Premier of the North West Territories has requested a Mackenzie Valley Highway providing a transportation corridor linking the Northern territories with the provinces of Canada. In Tuktoyaktuk Harper declared on August 27, 2008, that it is now mandatory and not voluntary that any large ships sailing into Canada’s Arctic waters to make a report to the Canadian Coast Guard. The C$16.2-billion 1,200-kilometre long Mackenzie Valley natural gas pipeline is a government priority which will enable further infrastructure programs such as additional ports and highways. Harper also announced that the 200 nautical mile zone extending from Canada’s shores pollution free with firmer environmental regulations.

Source

  • Irene Collins “The Arctic Region Is Going Through Scary Changes”. eFluxMedia, August 30, 2008
  • Livescience “Scientists Fear Increasing Temperatures Will Release Vast Amount of Carbon Frozen in Arctic Soil”. Imaginova, August 28, 2008
  • Arctic Pollution Issues: A State of the Arctic Environment Report. Stefansson Arctic Institute, 2004. Arctic Human Development Report. “New icebreaker to be named after former Tory chief”. UNEP/GRID-Arendal, 2008
  • CTV.ca News Staff “New icebreaker to be named after former Tory chief”. CTV Television Network, August 28, 2008
  • “New Arctic icebreaker to be named after Diefenbaker”. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, August 28, 2008
  • Andrea Thompson, “Vast Amount of Arctic Carbon Could Be Released”. Imaginova, August 27, 2008
  • “Harper talks tough on Arctic enforcement”. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, August 27, 2008
  • “New roads, port for N.W.T. hinge on pipeline: Harper”. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, August 27, 2008
  • Andrew Mayeda “New Arctic protection rules could be tough sell abroad: Harper”. Canwest News Service, August 27, 2008
  • “Gov’t announces cash for geo-mapping Arctic”. The StarPhoenix, August 27, 2008
  • “Harper lands in Inuvik for northern tour”. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, August 27, 2008
  • David Biello “Not-So-Permafrost: Big Thaw of Arctic Soil May Unleash Runaway Warming”. Scientific American, AAugust 26, 2008
  • Randy Boswell “Harper looks to reap Arctic bounty”. The Vancouver Sun, August 26, 2008
  • Bob Weber “Harper returns to North”. The Globe and Mail, August 24, 2008
  • Randy Boswell “Canada’s Arctic sovereignty bid begins in ‘busy place'”. National Post, August 22, 2008
  • Randy Boswell “Melting Beaufort Sea a hotbed of international activity”. Canwest News Service, August 21, 2008
  • Andrew Mayeda and Randy Boswell “Arctic Ambitions: Canada’s stake in the North”. Times-Colonist (Victoria), August 17, 2008
  • Randy Boswell “Canada embarks on search for Franklin’s lost ships”. The StarPhoenix, August 16, 2008
  • Randy Boswell “Arctic Ambitions: Canada’s stake in the North”. Times-Colonist (Victoria), August 16, 2008
  • Randy Boswell “Parks Canada to lead new search for Franklin ships”. Canwest News Service, August 15, 2008
  • Randy Boswell “Northwest Passage navigable again this summer”. The StarPhoenix, August 14, 2008
  • “Harper heading north of 60 again for sovereignty swing”. Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, August 13, 2008
  • “Canada, US team up in key Arctic study”. The Age, August 12, 2008
  • Ed Struzik “Military probes mystery blast in Arctic”. Canwest News Service, August 8, 2008
  • Randy Boswell “Research quietly backs Canada’s claims on Arctic sovereignty”. Canwest News Service, August 7, 2008
  • David Ljunggren “Giant chunks break off Canadian ice shelf”. Canwest News Service, July 30, 2008
  • “U of S professor to visit Canadian Arctic during Operation NANOOK 2008”. University of Saskatchewan, 2008
  • “Science cements Arctic claim, Russia says; Disputed Lomonosov Ridge key to claiming vast untapped resources”. University of Alberta, September 21, 2007
  • Randy Boswell “Danes pipe up with their own North Pole claims”. National Post, August 10, 2007
  • David Jackson “Microsoft PowerPoint – Ice diminishing Arctic 10 July07.ppt The Impact of Arctic climate change on the CCG Icebreaking program and marine transportation.”. Icebreaking Program Canadian Coast Guard, July 11, 2007
  • Randy Boswell “Russia poised to claim Arctic expanse on Canada’s doorstep”. Canwest News Service, Thursday, June 28, 2007
  • “Mapping continues along the Lomonosov Ridge”. Siku News, April 17, 2007
  • “RADARSAT-2 Information”. MacDonald Dettwiler, 1995-2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

September 16, 2007

Arctic ice levels at record low opening Northwest Passage

Arctic ice levels at record low opening Northwest Passage

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, September 16, 2007

This animation is comprised of Envisat ASAR mosaics of the Arctic Ocean for 2005, 2006 and 2007 and highlights the changes in sea ice. The ice-free areas appear as dark gray and the sea ice areas as light gray.
Image: ESA.

According to the European Space Agency (ESA), 200 satellite images from the Danish National Space Center (DNSC) indicate that the Arctic ice levels are at an all time low, since the first images taken in 1978, and as a result the Northwest Passage has completely opened up for the first time since humans began to record history.

The images have shown the melting of the ice has “dramatically increased” more than previously thought and that by 2030, all of the summer ice could be gone with the region being completely ice free by 2070. Researchers call it an “extreme” situation and say that the ice is now shrinking at a level of about three million square kilometers a year, up from one million square kilometers per year in 2005.

“The strong reduction in just one year certainly raises flags that the ice may disappear much sooner than expected,” said DNSC spokesman Leif Toudal Pedersen in a statement.

The new findings have put Canada and the United States at a standoff, both laying claim to the passage because it could be a valuable resource for the shipping industry. The passage goes through the boundaries of both nations. In 1985 diplomatic relations on the passage were strained after a U.S. icebreaker passed through without the U.S. notifying Canadian officials.

As a result, the Canadian military is building two new bases at both ends of the areas they claim to be theirs. There will also be at least six new naval patrol ships built, that will be stationed in the passage.

The U.S. claims that regardless which country boundaries the passage passes through, the waterway should be open to anyone who wants to use it.

“We believe it’s an international passage,” said U.S. President George W. Bush.

Denmark, Norway, and Russia all also lay claim to the vast amounts of minerals, natural gas, and oil.


Sources

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject:
Northwest Passage#Effects of climate change
Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
Older Posts »

Powered by WordPress