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March 29, 2014

Congolese refugee death toll climbs

Congolese refugee death toll climbs – Wikinews, the free news source

Congolese refugee death toll climbs

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Saturday, March 29, 2014

Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC)
Other stories from the DRC
  • 29 March 2014: Congolese refugee death toll climbs
  • 18 March 2012: FA Cup game abandoned after Fabrice Muamba collapses on pitch
  • 27 June 2011: Funeral held for former Zambian President Frederick Chiluba
  • 5 May 2011: DR Congo transport minister sacked after numerous boat accidents
  • 18 October 2010: ‘Enough, enough, enough, enough’: 1700 women march against mass rape in DR Congo
…More articles here
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The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) government has confirmed that at least 251 Congolese refugees died after their boat capsized on Lake Albert on Saturday, en-route from Uganda.

NASA satellite image of Lake Albert showing the border between the Democratic Republic of Congo and Uganda
Image: Slawojar.

Spokesman for the government, Lambert Mende, made the statement on Thursday: “It is with deep sorrow that we confirm the death of 251 of our compatriots who had boarded the boat from the Ugandan side of Lake Albert”.

Cquote1.svg It is with deep sorrow that we confirm the death of 251 of our compatriots who had boarded the boat from the Ugandan side of Lake Albert. Cquote2.svg

Lambert Mende

President Joseph Kabila declared three days of national mourning, which began on Thursday, described by Mende as a display of compassion and solidarity with the people of Congo.

The refugees were reportedly returning to the DRC, leaving Uganda voluntarily.

Mende has claimed this is due to the “poor quality of welcome to which they were subjected,” while the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) has recently recorded an increase in Congolese refugees spontaneously returning to the DRC, following a military victory over rebels in the nation’s east last November.

Tragedy struck the overcrowded vessel, when, as latest reports claim, it was carrying around three hundred people.

Two boats were attempting to cross Lake Albert from the Hoima district on the Ugandan shore.

The waterway is known to be dangerous when the weather is rough, and combined with a lack of life-jackets and a general inability of passengers to swim, incidents like this often lead to high body counts. Days before, a campaign had been launched by the DRC to enforce wearing lifejackets aboard all vessels in the nation’s waterways.

Since Saturday, the death toll has continued to climb, it was initially reported that twenty had died. On Monday, UNHCR received information from authorities that 41 people had been rescued and 98 bodies recovered. This number climbed again by Tuesday – with reports stating 107 had died, including 57 children.

The survivors were taken to the Bundibugyo district, in the north-west of Uganda, where UNHCR and the Ugandan government are providing help, including psycho-social support. Relatives of the deceased are identifying family members at the district hospital.

UNHCR and the Ugandan government are assisting in the transport of the bodies back to the DRC, and have established an information and response point for relatives of the survivors. Julian Paluku, governor of the North Kivu district has said the recovery of bodies will continue.

Reportedly, the refugees had originally fled the DRC after a July 2013 attack on the Kamango region to the east-northeast of the capital, Kinshasa.



Related news

  • “DR Congo transport minister sacked after numerous boat accidents” — Wikinews, May 5, 2011
  • “Up to 140 feared dead as boat sinks in DR Congo” — Wikinews, July 30, 2010
  • Boat in DR Congo capsizes, 80 feared dead” — Wikinews, May 8, 2010

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November 22, 2012

Militia group captures Goma, Congo; advances on villages

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Other stories from the DRC
  • 18 March 2012: FA Cup game abandoned after Fabrice Muamba collapses on pitch
  • 27 June 2011: Funeral held for former Zambian President Frederick Chiluba
  • 5 May 2011: DR Congo transport minister sacked after numerous boat accidents
  • 18 October 2010: ‘Enough, enough, enough, enough’: 1700 women march against mass rape in DR Congo
  • 30 July 2010: Up to 140 feared dead as boat sinks in DR Congo
…More articles here
Location of Democratic Republic of the Congo

A map showing the location of the DRC

To write, edit, start or view other articles on DRC, visit the DRC Portal
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Thursday, November 22, 2012

The March 23 Movement (M23) militia captured the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) city of Goma Tuesday, largely without resistance from the Congolese military or United Nations intervention; they have continued to advance on regional villages, where the response of additional local factions has led to violence and civilian displacement.

North Kivu province, Democratic Republic of Congo

On Monday, M23 fired mortars and fully automatic weapons at targets near the city of Goma, in the DRC North Kivu province. The M23 militia unsuccessfully urged President Joseph Kabila‘s government to begin negotiations for the group’s withdrawal from the Goma area. M23 demanded that the DRC government demilitarize Goma and open the international border at Bunagana. The Congolese government refused negotiation offers.

Without negotiations, the M23 continued their advance on Goma. On Tuesday, the M23 approached the city. The DRC military withdrew from the area while UN forces stood aside. A statement from the UN peacekeepers explained that their role is not to engage in a civil war, but rather to protect civilians.

Once Goma was under M23 control, the militia turned its efforts to surrounding areas. The M23 captured the small town of Sake, about 25 km (15 mi) west-northwest of Goma. Congolese military units and other local combatants eventually responded by attacking the M23 near Sake. Local civilians fled the violence.

Harsh conditions in Mugunga (September, 2012).
Image: Steven van Damme/Oxfam.

The United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO) set up a camp for the internally displaced people in the village of Mugunga, about 10km from Goma. People struggled along roadways towards Mugunga with what few of their possesions they could carry in plastic bags, thrown across a shoulder, or carried on top of their heads. Families huddled together at Mugunga among piles of their belongings. Oxfam International recently estimated more than 50,000 people are refugees of the conflict..

The DRC government has previously expressed belief that the M23 group is operating as an extension of the Rwandan Army. The UN Security Council alleged that Rwanda, as well as Uganda, supplied mortars and other military equipment, as well as logistics, to the rebels. Rwanda has denied involvement. The DRC has called for international sanctions on Rwanda to discourage support for the M23 forces.

The presidents of DRC, Rwanda, and Uganda, meeting in Kampala, Uganda, called on the militia to end their occupation of areas they have taken. M23 spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel Vianney Kazarama has said the group indend to seize the eastern town of Bukavu.

A miner in the Democratic Republic of Congo holds Wolframite minerals.
Image: Julien Harneis.

M23 soldiers near Bunagana in July.
Image: Al Jazeera.

The M23 consists of many Tutsis from a previous military group called the National Congress for the Defense of the People (CNDP). The M23 group defected in April, following the failure of a peace accord from March 23, 2009 between the CNDP and the Congolese government.

DRC is a resource rich area. It is one of the world’s primary producers of several minerals used in electronics manufacturing, including Wolframite and Coltan. The wealth in minerals and diamonds has enticed many groups to attempt to gain control of the region, and has been the cause of prior conflicts.



Sister links

  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg Democratic Republic of Congo

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Militia group captures Goma, Congo

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
Other stories from the DRC
  • 18 March 2012: FA Cup game abandoned after Fabrice Muamba collapses on pitch
  • 27 June 2011: Funeral held for former Zambian President Frederick Chiluba
  • 5 May 2011: DR Congo transport minister sacked after numerous boat accidents
  • 18 October 2010: ‘Enough, enough, enough, enough’: 1700 women march against mass rape in DR Congo
  • 30 July 2010: Up to 140 feared dead as boat sinks in DR Congo
…More articles here
Location of Democratic Republic of the Congo

A map showing the location of the DRC

To write, edit, start or view other articles on DRC, visit the DRC Portal
Flag of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.svg

Thursday, November 22, 2012

The March 23 Movement (M23) militia captured the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) city of Goma Tuesday, largely without resistance from the Congolese military or United Nations intervention; they have continued to advance on regional villages, where the response of additional local factions has led to violence and civilian displacement.

North Kivu province, Democratic Republic of Congo

On Monday, M23 fired mortars and fully automatic weapons at targets near the city of Goma, in the DRC North Kivu province. The M23 militia unsuccessfully urged President Joseph Kabila‘s government to begin negotiations for the group’s withdrawal from the Goma area. M23 demanded that the DRC government demilitarize Goma and open the international border at Bunagana. The Congolese government refused negotiation offers.

Without negotiations, the M23 continued their advance on Goma. On Tuesday, the M23 approached the city. The DRC military withdrew from the area while UN forces stood aside. A statement from the UN peacekeepers explained that their role is not to engage in a civil war, but rather to protect civilians.

Once Goma was under M23 control, the militia turned its efforts to surrounding areas. The M23 captured the small town of Sake, about 25 km (15 mi) west-northwest of Goma. Congolese military units and other local combatants eventually responded by attacking the M23 near Sake. Local civilians fled the violence.

Harsh conditions in Mugunga (September, 2012).
Image: Steven van Damme/Oxfam.

The United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO) set up a camp for the internally displaced people in the village of Mugunga, about 10km from Goma. People struggled along roadways towards Mugunga with what few of their possesions they could carry in plastic bags, thrown across a shoulder, or carried on top of their heads. Families huddled together at Mugunga among piles of their belongings. Oxfam International recently estimated more than 50,000 people are refugees of the conflict..

The DRC government has previously expressed belief that the M23 group is operating as an extension of the Rwandan Army. The UN Security Council alleged that Rwanda, as well as Uganda, supplied mortars and other military equipment, as well as logistics, to the rebels. Rwanda has denied involvement. The DRC has called for international sanctions on Rwanda to discourage support for the M23 forces.

The presidents of DRC, Rwanda, and Uganda, meeting in Kampala, Uganda, called on the militia to end their occupation of areas they have taken. M23 spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel Vianney Kazarama has said the group indend to seize the eastern town of Bukavu.

A miner in the Democratic Republic of Congo holds Wolframite minerals.
Image: Julien Harneis.

M23 soldiers near Bunagana in July.
Image: Al Jazeera.

The M23 consists of many Tutsis from a previous military group called the National Congress for the Defense of the People (CNDP). The M23 group defected in April, following the failure of a peace accord from March 23, 2009 between the CNDP and the Congolese government.

DRC is a resource rich area. It is one of the world’s primary producers of several minerals used in electronics manufacturing, including Wolframite and Coltan. The wealth in minerals and diamonds has enticed many groups to attempt to gain control of the region, and has been the cause of prior conflicts.



Sister links

  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg Democratic Republic of Congo

Sources

External links

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Militia group threatens Goma, Congo

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Thursday, November 22, 2012

Location of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

The March 23 Movement (M23) militia captured the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) city of Goma, largely without Congolese military resistance or United Nations intervention.

On November 19, 2012, M23 fired mortars and automatic weapons at targets near the edges of Goma. The M23 militia unsuccessfully urged President Joseph Kabila’s government to begin negotiations for the group’s withdrawal from Goma area. M23 demanded Goma’s demilitarization and the re-opening of the international border at Bunagana. The Congolese government refused negotiation offers

Without negotiations, the M23 continued their advance on Goma. As the M23 approached the city, DRC military withdrew while UN peacekeepers stood aside. The UN peacekeepers have said their role is not to engage in a civil war.

The M23 militia have continued to advance on regional villages, where the response of additional local factions has been more violent. This fighting has displaced at least 55,000 civilians from the North Kivu province, according to Oxfam International.

Cquote1.svg “The [UN] Secretary-General strongly condemns the grave violations of international humanitarian and human rights law by the M23 and calls on all parties to allow safe, timely and unhindered humanitarian access to those in need.” Cquote2.svg

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon

The DRC government has expressed belief that the M23 group is operating as an extension of the Rwandan Army. The UN Security Council alleged that Rwanda, as well as Uganda, supplied mortars and other military equipment, as well as logistics, to the rebels. Rwanda has denied involvement. The DRC has called for international sanctions on Rwanda to discourage support for the M23 forces.

The M23 mainly consists of Tutsis, formerly part in the Congolese army, who defected in May. M23 comes from a failed peace accord, between the National Congress for the Defence of the People (CNDP) and the Congolese government, that was signed March 23, 2009.

DRC is a resource rich area. It is one of the world’s primary producers of several minerals used in electronics manufacturing, specifically Coltan. The wealth in minerals and diamonds has attracted many groups to attempt to gain control of the region, and has been the cause of prior conflicts.



Sources

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject:
Democratic Republic of Congo

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November 19, 2012

Goma, Congo attacked by rebels

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Monday, November 19, 2012

Location of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

The Democratic Republic of the Congo‘s (DRC) March 23 Movement (M23) militia group are threatening to attack the eastern city of Goma.

M23 have fired mortars and automatic weapons at targets near the edges of the city.

Cquote1.svg “The [UN] Secretary-General strongly condemns the grave violations of international humanitarian and human rights law by the M23 and calls on all parties to allow safe, timely and unhindered humanitarian access to those in need.” Cquote2.svg

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon

The M23 militia have unsuccessfully urged President Joseph Kabila’s government to begin negotiations for the group’s withdrawal from Goma. M23 demanded Goma’s demilitarization and the re-opening of the international border at Bunagana. The Congolese government has refused negotiation offers, and has expressed belief that the M23 group is operating as an extension of the Rwandan Army. The UN Security Council has alleged that Rwanda, as well as Uganda, supplied mortars and other military equipment to the rebels. Rwanda has denied involvement.

The DRC has called for international sanctions on Rwanda to discourage support for the M23 forces.

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon has condemned the violence in a recent statement: “The Secretary-General is deeply concerned by the devastating humanitarian consequences of the fighting that has led to the displacement of at least 60,000 people, many of whom are fleeing toward Goma. The Secretary-General strongly condemns the grave violations of international humanitarian and human rights law by the M23 and calls on all parties to allow safe, timely and unhindered humanitarian access to those in need.”

The M23 mainly consists of Tutsis, formerly part in the Congolese army, who defected in May. M23 comes from a failed peace accord, between the National Congress for the Defence of the People (CNDP) and the Congolese government, that was signed March 23, 2009.

DRC is a resource rich area. It is one of the world’s primary producers of several minerals used in electronics manufacturing, specifically Coltan. The wealth in minerals and diamonds has attracted many groups to attempt to gain control of the region, and has been the cause of prior conflicts.



Sources

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject:
Democratic Republic of Congo

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March 18, 2012

FA Cup game abandoned after Fabrice Muamba collapses on pitch

FA Cup game abandoned after Fabrice Muamba collapses on pitch

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Sunday, March 18, 2012

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Fabrice Muamba in 2007
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The FA Cup quarter final tie between Tottenham Hotspur and Bolton Wanderers was abandoned after Bolton player Fabrice Muamba collapsed on the pitch. Muamba collapsed around the 41 minute mark with no players around him and was reported to have stopped breathing. The game was being played at Tottenham’s home ground, White Hart Lane.

After being treated on the pitch for ten minutes by a total of six medics Muamba was taken down the tunnel while supporters of both teams chanted his name. Both mouth-to-mouth resuscitation and a defibrillator were used to try and revive the player. It was reported by ESPN that Muamba was not breathing while he was being carried down the tunnel.

Tributes have already begun to flood in offering support and prayers for the 23-year old. Former team mate Jack Wilshire tweeted “Hope Muamba is okay. Thoughts with him.” Justin Hoyte, who came through the Arsenal youth team with him, said “I seriously hope my best friend in football is OK. Stay strong bro please please stay strong. God is with you remember that.”

Muamba was born in Zaire, now the Democratic Republic of Congo, and came to the United Kingdom as a child. He joined Bolton Wanderers in 2008 after time with Birmingham City and the Arsenal youth squad.



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May 5, 2011

DR Congo transport minister sacked after numerous boat accidents

DR Congo transport minister sacked after numerous boat accidents

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Thursday, May 5, 2011

DR Congo has a high number of fatal boat accidents

Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC)
Other stories from the DRC
  • 29 March 2014: Congolese refugee death toll climbs
  • 18 March 2012: FA Cup game abandoned after Fabrice Muamba collapses on pitch
  • 27 June 2011: Funeral held for former Zambian President Frederick Chiluba
  • 5 May 2011: DR Congo transport minister sacked after numerous boat accidents
  • 18 October 2010: ‘Enough, enough, enough, enough’: 1700 women march against mass rape in DR Congo
…More articles here
Location of Democratic Republic of the Congo

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Marie-Laure Kawanda, the transport minister for the Democratic Republic of the Congo, has been sacked by the government after a series of boat accidents in the country. Kawanda was dismissed after a boat sank on Monday while sailing on the Kasai River left around 100 people missing.

A spokesman for the government released a statement saying that Kawanda had failed to “ensure that regulations related to navigation are respected.” Information minister Lambert Mende commented on Ms Kawanda’s sacking, saying, “She should have introduced rules to prevent boats travelling at night and to stop cargo boats from carrying passengers. We don’t have the exact number [of victims] but we think it is probably considerably higher than what has already been reported.”

He added that the government will be paying for the funerals of the victims.

Fatal boat accidents are a common occurrence in DR Congo. On the same river where Monday’s accident happened, up to 200 people died last year when a boat capsized. According to the Red Cross, 40 people died when an overcrowded boat sank on Lake Kivu last week.



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July 30, 2010

Up to 140 feared dead as boat sinks in DR Congo

Up to 140 feared dead as boat sinks in DR Congo

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Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC)
Other stories from the DRC
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Location of Democratic Republic of the Congo

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To write, edit, start or view other articles on DRC, visit the DRC Portal
Flag of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.svg
Kasai river from above
Image: NASA.
Bandundu province is in the west of the Democratic Republic of the Congo
Image: Morwen / Wikipedia.

Friday, July 30, 2010

As many as 140 people are feared dead after a boat sank on the Kasai River, a tributary of the Congo River, in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

The central African country, of equivalent size to western Europe, has very poor road infrastructure, meaning that many people travel on boats, which are often overloaded. The boat involved in the accident was travelling to the capital city, Kinshasa, from the town of Mushie. The accident occurred in the province of Bandundu, approximately 30 km (20 miles) from the provincial capital, where officials reportedly held a crisis meeting to deal with the incident.

The boat is believed to have been overweight, carrying at least 180 passengers as well as goods. It is the dry season in the Congo, so the river is shallow. The sinking was reportedly the result of hitting a mud bank, causing the vessel to capsize.

Lambert Mende, the Congolese information minister, said in a statement that at least 80 people had been confirmed dead while 76 were thought to have survived. However, the local police later announced a provisional death toll of 138, and possibly more.

Safety standards are poor in the Democratic Republic, with overcrowding common on boats, which often do not carry lifejackets and are forced to navigate poorly marked waterways, meaning that fatal accidents are not uncommon in the country.


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June 10, 2010

Two Norwegians sentenced to death in DR Congo

Two Norwegians sentenced to death in DR Congo

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Thursday, June 10, 2010

Two former Norwegian soldiers have been sentenced to death in the Democratic Republic of Congo for the third time, having been accused of spying and murder.

Joshua French and Tjostolv Moland were originally sentenced in September 2009, but lost their appeal in December of the same year. The latest trial was held in April after the Congolese Military High Court overturned the original sentences and ordered a retrial. The pair are reportedly intending to appeal their sentence once again.

The pair have been accused of murdering Abedi Kasongo while they were travelling from Uganda to the DR Congo on motorcycles. When their bikes broke down, they hired Kasongo to drive them back to Uganda. The pair claim that during the journey they were ambushed by jungle rebels and Kasongo was killed. Because the former soldiers were carrying Norwegian military identification they were also accused of spying.

One of the accused holds dual Norwegian-British citizenship. UK-based charity Reprieve condemned the actions of the Congo courts. A spokesperson said that “Each time the military prosecution changes their theory, the witnesses all obligingly change their story. It is now clear why the DRC’s own constitution forbids the military from administering justice.”

Both suspects continue to defend their innocence, and Britain and Norway both expressed their opposition to the sentence. A Norwegian spokesperson said that “Norway is a strong opponent against the death penalty, and we have been communicating this stance to the relevant authorities. We have received assurances from the authorities that the death sentence won’t be carried out and we hold the authorities responsible for the well being of these two.” A spokesperson for Britain’s Foreign Office said that “We will be doing everything we properly can to support him in the coming weeks and months. We are committed to supporting any British national who faces the death penalty and our prime concern in this case is to ensure that no execution is carried out.”



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May 8, 2010

Boat in DR Congo capsizes, 80 feared dead

Boat in DR Congo capsizes, 80 feared dead

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Saturday, May 8, 2010

Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC)
Other stories from the DRC
  • 29 March 2014: Congolese refugee death toll climbs
  • 18 March 2012: FA Cup game abandoned after Fabrice Muamba collapses on pitch
  • 27 June 2011: Funeral held for former Zambian President Frederick Chiluba
  • 5 May 2011: DR Congo transport minister sacked after numerous boat accidents
  • 18 October 2010: ‘Enough, enough, enough, enough’: 1700 women march against mass rape in DR Congo
…More articles here
Location of Democratic Republic of the Congo

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To write, edit, start or view other articles on DRC, visit the DRC Portal
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At least eighty people in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) are feared dead after a boat capsized on the Congo River.

The boat was carrying 125 people when it turned over on Wednesday evening near the city of Kindu, capital of the eastern Maniema province; 45 people have been rescued from the waters, but the rest are missing, and some reports say twenty people were already confirmed dead. Rescue efforts are still ongoing.

“It was yesterday. It is thought that there could be around 80 dead. There were around 120 people on board,” said a spokesman for UN peacekeeping mission in DRC, Madnodje Mounoubai.

It wasn’t immediately clear why the accident happened; however, boats in the DRC frequently are overcrowded as they are a popular means of transport.



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