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July 9, 2016

Klopp signs contract extension with Liverpool

Klopp signs contract extension with Liverpool

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Saturday, July 9, 2016

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On Friday, German manager Jürgen Klopp signed contract extension with English football club Liverpool F.C. He was appointed as the manager in October on three years term.

Joining the Merseyside almost nine months ago, Klopp guided Liverpool to the FA League Cup and UEFA Europa League final. Liverpool finished eighth in the Premier League last season.

FSG president Mike Gordon said, “He [Klopp] is a world-class managerial talent and his leadership will be critical to everything we hope to achieve in the years ahead.”

Coaching staff members Zeljko Buvac and Peter Krawiet have extended their contracts as well.


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May 19, 2016

Sevilla wins third consecutive Europa League title, beating Liverpool 3-1

Sevilla wins third consecutive Europa League title, beating Liverpool 3-1

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Thursday, May 19, 2016

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Yesterday, Spanish football club Sevilla FC defeated English football club Liverpool F.C. in the 2016 UEFA Europa League Final at St. Jakob-Park in Basel, Switzerland. In doing so, Sevilla defended their title and claimed their third consecutive title under manager Unai Emery. Sevilla have lifted the trophy five times — in 2006, 2007, 2014, 2015 and 2016.

Logo of UEFA Europa League.
Image: UEFA Europa League.

Cquote1.svg It was obvious the first goal of Sevilla had a big influence on our own game. In this moment we lost faith in our style of play. Cquote2.svg

—Jürgen Klopp, Liverpool F.C. manager

Liverpool started the brighter of the two teams in the opening half. For the match overall they had 72% ball possession and had six shots on target. But The Reds committed nineteen fouls in the match while the Spanish side committed just nine. Sevilla’s goalkeeper David Soria kept Liverpool at bay as he saved shots from Liverpool’s Emre Can shortly before the ten-minute mark. Sevilla defender Daniel Carriço cleared a goal-bound effort off the line from Liverpool striker Daniel Sturridge. Sturridge tested Soria a while later, but the goalkeeper blocked successfully. In the 35th minute Sturridge collected a pass from Brazillian Philippe Coutinho and curled the ball with the outside of his left foot to give Liverpool the lead. Liverpool had a chance to extend their lead before the half-time break through Adam Lallana, but Sevilla defender Daniel Carriço blocked his attempt. Liverpool ended the first-half with a 1–0 lead.

Sevilla’s Kevin Gameiro levelled the score in the 46th minute from Mariano Ferreira‘s cross. Sevilla took the lead in the 64th minute through their captain, Coke, who shot beyond Liverpool’s goalkeeper Simon Mignolet to score. Six minutes later Sevilla extended their lead when Coke pounced on a loose ball in the box to ensure Sevilla claimed their third consecutive UEFA Europa League title.

After the match, Liverpool manager Jürgen Klopp in a press conference said “It was obvious the first goal of Sevilla had a big influence on our own game. In this moment we lost faith in our style of play. We changed from passing simply and quickly to complicated. We lost our formation, so it was not compact anymore”.




May 18, 2016
20:45 local time (18:45 UTC)
Liverpool F.C. 1–3 Sevilla FC St. Jakob-Park, Basel, Switzerland
Attendance: 34,429
Referee: Flag of Sweden.svg Jonas Eriksson (Sweden)
Daniel Sturidge Scored after 35 minutes 35′
Dejan Lovren Booked after 30 minutes 30′
Martin Škrtel Booked after 70 minutes 70′
Divock Origi Booked after 72 minutes 72′
Nathaniel Clyne Booked after 90 + 4 minutes 90 + 4′
(1–0) HT Kevin Gamiero Scored after 46 minutes 46′
Coke Scored after 64, 70 minutes 64, 70′
Vitolo Booked after 56 minutes 56′
Éver Banega Booked after 57 minutes 57′
Adil Rami Booked after 77 minutes 77′
Mariano Ferreira Booked after 84 minutes 84′

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May 18, 2016

Sevilla win third successive UEFA Europa League title after beating Liverpool in Basel

Sevilla win third successive UEFA Europa League title after beating Liverpool in Basel

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Wednesday, May 18, 2016

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Yesterday, Spanish football club Sevilla FC defeated English football club Liverpool F.C. in the 2016 UEFA Europa League Final at St. Jakob-Park in Basel, Switzerland. In doing so, Sevilla defended their title and claimed their third consecutive title under manager Unai Emery. Sevilla became first club in the tournament history to lift the trophy five times—in 2006, 2007, 2014, 2015 and 2016.

Logo of UEFA Europa League.
Image: UEFA Europa League.

Cquote1.svg It was obvious the first goal of Sevilla had a big influence on our own game. In this moment we lost faith in our style of play. We changed from passing simply and quickly to complicated. We lost our formation, so it was not compact anymore. Cquote2.svg

—Jürgen Klopp

Sevilla appeared in their third successive final while Liverpool made their first appearance for nine years. Liverpool started the brighter of the two teams in the opening half. Merseyside had 72% ball possession and had six shots on target. But, The Reds committed nineteen fouls in the match while the Spanish side committed just nine. Sevilla’s goalkeeper David Soria kept Liverpool at bay as he saved shots from Liverpool’s Emre Can shortly before the ten-minute mark. Sevilla were thankful that defender Daniel Carriço was on hand to decisively clear a goal-bound effort off the line from Liverpool striker, Daniel Sturridge. Sturridge tested Soria a while later, but the goalkeeper was equal to the shot and blocked successfully. Soria could do nothing to deny Sturridge. In the 35th minute when he collected a pass from Brazillian Philippe Coutinho and curled the ball with the outside of his left foot to give Liverpool the lead. Liverpool had a chance to extend their lead before the half-time break through Adam Lallana, but Sevilla defender Daniel Carriço blocked his attempt. Liverpool ended the first-half with a 1–0 lead.

Sevilla looked to bounce back in the second-half and they did not have to wait long as Kevin Gameiro levelled the score in the 46th minute from Mariano Ferreira‘s cross. Sevilla took the lead in the 64th minute through captain, Coke, who shot beyond Liverpool’s goalkeeper Simon Mignolet to score. Six minutes later Sevilla extended their lead when Coke pounced on a loose ball in the box to ensure Sevilla claimed an unprecedented fifth overall and third consecutive UEFA Europa League title.

After the match, Liverpool manager Jürgen Klopp in a press conference said “It was obvious the first goal of Sevilla had a big influence on our own game. In this moment we lost faith in our style of play. We changed from passing simply and quickly to complicated. We lost our formation, so it was not compact anymore”.




May 18, 2016
20:45 CET (UTC+01:00)
Liverpool F.C. 1–3 Sevilla FC St.Jakob-Park, Basel, Switzerland
Attendance: 34,429
Referee: Flag of Sweden.svg Jonas Eriksson (Sweden)
Daniel Sturidge Scored after 35 minutes 35′
Dejan Lovren Booked after 29 minutes 29′
Divock Orig Booked after 72 minutes 72′
Nathaniel Clyne Booked after 90 + 4 minutes 90 + 4′
(1–0) HT Kevin Gamiero Scored after 46 minutes 46′
Coke Scored after 64, 70 minutes 64, 70′
Vitolo Booked after 56 minutes 56′
Éver Banega Booked after 57 minutes 57′
Adil Rami Booked after 77 minutes 77′
Mariano Ferreira Booked after 83 minutes 83′

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October 10, 2015

Jürgen Klopp signs 3 year contract with Liverpool

Jürgen Klopp signs 3 year contract with Liverpool

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Saturday, October 10, 2015

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Liverpool-based football club Liverpool F.C. (LFC) appointed German Jürgen Klopp as the club’s new manager. Klopp signed a three-year contract with LFC for GBP £15 million, with annual earnings of £5 million and an increment to £7 million if the club wins the Premier League or if the club qualifies for the UEFA Champions League.

Klopp in Borussia Dortmund jersey in 2014
Image: Tim.Reckmann.

Klopp’s predecessor, Brendan Rodgers, was fired on Sunday after three-and-half-years of service at Anfield.

Liverpool were at 10th position in the League table and drew 1–1 against local rivals Everton.

Klopp previously served as the manager at German football club Borussia Dortmund (BVB) and won the German Bundesliga with them twice. Klopp held the position of Dortmund manager until May 2015, and his last match was against Wolfsburg in the DFB Pokal cup.

This signing made Klopp the highest-paid manager in Liverpool history. His first match in the Premier League will be against Tottenham Hotspur on October 17. Liverpool have only had four wins out of eleven league games this season.

In response to this signing, Borussia Dortmund tweeted “We heard the news today, oh boy! All the best at the Kop, Jürgen Klopp!”



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August 21, 2015

Thousands attend Cilla Black funeral

Thousands attend Cilla Black funeral – Wikinews, the free news source

Thousands attend Cilla Black funeral

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Friday, August 21, 2015

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File photo of Cilla Black, 1970.
Image: Joost Evers / Anefo.

Stars from the world of showbusiness joined fans and mourners yesterday at the funeral of the popular entertainer Cilla Black. Her coffin was transported in a cortege in Liverpool where she grew up, with thousands of people paying their respects. Some were holding memorabilia related to Black’s 50-year long career in entertainment, which included singing and presenting television programmes such as Blind Date.

The Roman Catholic mass was conducted by Tom Williams, auxiliary bishop of Liverpool, in St Mary’s Roman Catholic Church in Liverpool’s Woolton area. This is the same church that Black got married in 1969 to Bobby Willis, who died in 1999 after 30 years of marriage. Eulogies were delivered by Cliff Richard and Paul O’Grady together with poems read by two of Black’s sons. Further tributes were paid by Tom Jones, who flew in specially for the funeral.

After the service, Black was interred in a private ceremony, next to the graves of her oarents at the Allerton cemetery, close to the church. She died on August 1, aged 72, after she fell at her home in Spain and suffered a stroke.



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Cilla Black funeral

Cilla Black funeral – Wikinews, the free news source

Cilla Black funeral

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Friday, August 21, 2015

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File photo of Cilla Black, 1970.
Image: Joost Evers / Anefo.

Stars from the world of showbusiness joined fans and mourners at the funeral of the popular entertainer Cilla Black. Her coffin was transported in a cortege in Liverpool where she grew up, with thousands of people paying their respects. Some were holding memorabilia related to Black’s 50-year long career in entertainment, which included singing and presenting television programmes such as Blind Date.

The Roman Catholic mass was conducted by Tom Williams, auxiliary bishop of Liverpool, in St Mary’s Roman Catholic Church in Liverpool’s Woolton area. This is the same church that Black got married in 1969 to Bobby Willis, who died in 1999 after 30 years of marriage. Eulogies were delivered by Cliff Richard and Paul O’Grady together with poems read by two of Black’s sons. Further tributes were paid by Tom Jones, who flew in specially for the funeral.

After the service, Black was interred in a private ceremony, next to the graves of her oarents at the Allerton cemetery, close to the church. She died on August 1, aged 72, after she fell at her home in Spain and suffered a stroke.



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Cilla Black funeral held in Liverpool

Cilla Black funeral held in Liverpool – Wikinews, the free news source

Cilla Black funeral held in Liverpool

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Friday, August 21, 2015

File photo of Cilla Black, 1970.
Image: Joost Evers / Anefo.

Stars from the world of showbusiness joined fans and mourners yesterday at the funeral of the popular entertainer Cilla Black. Her coffin was transported in a cortege in Liverpool where she grew up, with hundreds of people paying their respects. Some were holding memorabilia related to Black’s 50-year long career in entertainment, which included singing and presenting television programmes such as Blind Date.

Tom Williams, auxiliary bishop of Liverpool, conducted the Roman Catholic mass in St Mary’s Roman Catholic Church in Liverpool’s Woolton area. This is the same church that Black got married in 1969 to Bobby Willis, who died in 1999 after 30 years of marriage. Eulogies were delivered by Cliff Richard and Paul O’Grady together with poems read by two of Black’s sons. Further tributes were paid by Tom Jones, who flew in specially for the funeral.

After the service, Black was to be interred in a private ceremony, next to the graves of her parents at the Allerton cemetery. She died early this month, aged 72, after she fell at her home in Spain and suffered a stroke.



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August 10, 2011

Riots in England continue for a fourth night

Riots in England continue for a fourth night

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Wednesday, August 10, 2011

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A burnt out car in Liverpool, following a further night of rioting.
Image: Andy Miah.

Rioting continued to spread throughout England last night, with reports of violence in Manchester. Birmingham, Liverpool and Nottingham also suffered a second night of disorder, with three confirmed fatalities in Birmingham. In the capital, the extra ten thousand police brought into the city on Tuesday kept the city relatively under control, with no major violence reported.

A Miss Selfridge shop in Manchester was set ablaze as gangs of rioters looted from and trashed shops in the city center. In Nottingham, police arrested over 90 people during incidents that included attacks on three police stations with petrol bombs.

In Birmingham, arrests were made as gangs attempted to break into shopping centers. In the early hours it was reported that shots had been fired upon police, and that three British Asian men had been killed in a hit-and-run attack whilst protecting their business from looting.

Prime Minister David Cameron has authorised the use of water cannons to control the riots, at 24 hours notice, and has reiterated the fact that police have legal authority to employ baton-rounds if required. However, Sir Hugh Orde, the President of the Association of Chief Police Officers, has ruled out the deployment of water cannons for the foreseeable future, as “these are fast-moving crowds, where water cannon would not be appropriate.”

Meanwhile, a community-organized cleanup operation has been mobilised through social media websites like Facebook and Twitter.



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August 9, 2011

Rioting develops throughout England

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Rioting develops throughout England

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Tuesday, August 9, 2011

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A fireman puts out a fire in Tottenham caused by rioters.
Image: Christophe Maximin.

Rioting, theft, vandalism and other acts of violence are currently occurring in various cities throughout England. There is a substantial rioting problem, primarily in the capital of London, which has spread to the cities of Birmingham, Bristol, Liverpool and Nottingham.

David Cameron, the current UK Prime Minister, condemned the violent acts, referring to them as “sickening”, proclaiming that those involving themselves the incident “will feel the full force of the law”. At least 563 individuals have been arrested in relation to these incidents. He also reported that Parliament is to be recalled this Thursday. The number of police officers in London tonight is to be increased from six thousand to sixteen thousand, the Prime Minister said, with any pre-arranged leave being abandoned.

The riots were sparked by the fatal shooting by police of 29-year-old Mark Duggan on Thursday in Tottenham, during the planned arrest of Duggan as part of anti-gun unit Operation Trident. Reports from the Independent Police Complaints Commission (IPCC) claimed that Duggan had been shot in retaliation, however the IPCC later admitted there is no evidence that Duggan shot at the police. On Sunday, a peaceful protest in Tottenham held by Duggan’s family and friends sparked a series of disturbances in the area, which quickly became a violent riot, with youths from the area looting and clashing with Police.

For three consecutive days, London has experienced what the Metropolitan Police have referred to as “copycat criminal activity”. Hundreds of arrests have now occurred, with 105 individuals having been charged for a variety of crimes. The Metropolitan Police are now contemplating the concept of using plastic bullets as a disciplinary method within the riots. As of yet, English police have never used such a weapon in this context.



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December 5, 2010

UK Parliament to vote on tuition fee rise on Thursday

UK Parliament to vote on tuition fee rise on Thursday

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Sunday, December 5, 2010

Students protesting outside the UK parliament in November.
Image: BillyH.

The controversial plan to raise university tuition fees in England and Wales will be voted on in the House of Commons on Thursday, December 9. The policy has been the cause of protests across the United Kingdom by students, some of which have turned violent. It has also been a source of considerable criticism and political difficulties for the Liberal Democrats and has raised questions as to the long-term viability of the Coalition government.

The new policy on tuition fees will allow universities to double the current tuition fees from £3,290 per year to around £6,000 per year, as well as allowing some universities to get special approval from the Office For Fair Access (OFFA) to raise their fees to £9,000 per year. If passed, the new fee structure will apply starting in the academic year of 2012/2013. The vote on Thursday will only be on the fee rise, with other matters being voted on in the new year following publication of a new higher education white paper.

Vince Cable and Nick Clegg will likely vote for the changes, but how many Lib Dems will join them?
Image: Nick Clegg.

In addition to increasing fees, the policy will increase the payment threshold at which payment is made. It is currently set at £15,000 and will rise to £21,000, but the interest rate will also rise. It is currently 1.5% but will now vary from between 0% and 3% plus inflation (using the Retail Price Index).

The fee increase follows the publication of an independent review by Lord Browne, former chief executive of BP, a process started by Peter Mandelson, the former Business Secretary. Before the election, two main options were mooted for funding reform in higher education: either an increase in tuition fees or a graduate tax. The Browne Review endorsed the former and the findings of the Review form the basis of the government’s policy. The graduate tax was supported by the Liberal Democrats before the election, and in the Labour leadership elections it was supported by Ed Balls and the winner of the leadership election, Ed Milliband.

Conservative members of the Coalition intend to vote for the reform, and the Labour opposition have been vociferous critics of the rise in fees, despite the previous government’s introduction of top-up fees. The Liberal Democratic members of the Coalition have been left in a politically difficult position regarding the fee hike and have been target of much criticism from protesters. Liberal Democrats have opposed the rise in tuition fees: their party manifesto included a commitment to ending tuition fees within six years, and many signed a pledge organised by the National Union of Students to not vote for any increase in tuition fees.

The Coalition agreement allows Liberal Democrats to opt to abstain on votes for a number of policies including tuition fees. Many Liberal Democrats are expected to abstain, and a few MPs have stated that they will vote against it including former party leader Sir Menzies Campbell, and the recently elected party president Tim Farron, as well as a number of Liberal Democrat back-benchers. Liberal Democrat party leaders have said that they will act collectively, but the BBC have said senior Liberal Democrats have admitted in private that government whips will not be able to force all Liberal Democrats to vote for the policy.

On Tuesday, the Liberal Democrats parliamentary party will meet in the Commons to decide on their collective position. If all ministers decide to vote for the policy, it will probably pass, but if only cabinet ministers (and maybe parliamentary private secretaries) vote for the policy, there is considerable risk of it not passing. If the Coalition does not manage to get the policy through Parliament, it will fuel doubts about the continued effectiveness and viability of the government.

How deputy prime minister Nick Clegg and business secretary Vince Cable vote has been of considerable controversy. Although under the Coalition agreement, they are allowed to abstain, suggestions of doing so have prompted criticism. It was suggested last week that Cable may abstain even though as business secretary he is directly responsible for higher education policy, and has been heavily involved in designing the proposals. Cable has said that Liberal Democrat support of the tuition fee changes has allowed them to push it in a more “progressive” direction.

Cable has now decided that he will vote for the policy, and argues that the policy has “a lot of protection for students from low income backgrounds and graduates who have a low income or take time out for family”. He also believes “there’s common consensus that the system we’ve devised is a progressive one”.

“Dr Cable has performed so many U-turns over the issue of university funding that he is spinning on his heels,” said National Union of Students president Aaron Porter. “That may stand him in good stead with the Strictly Come Dancing judges but the electorate will see it differently.”

Former deputy PM John Prescott has joked about Vince Cable’s u-turns on Twitter.
Image: Steve Punter.

Former deputy prime minister John Prescott joked on Twitter that “On tuition fees we’ve noticed Vince Cable’s remarkable transformation in the last few weeks from stalling to Mr In Between”—a reference to a previous attack Prescott made on Gordon Brown as having transformed from “Stalin to Mr Bean“.

On Question Time this week, Liberal Democrat treasury secretary Danny Alexander also confirmed he is prepared to vote for the policy but delegated the question to the meeting of Liberal Democrats on Tuesday.

The politics of the tuition fee debate may also affect the by-election taking place in Oldham East and Saddleworth following the removal of Phil Woolas, where Liberal Democrat and Conservative candidates will both be standing for the first by-election following the formation of the Coalition government.

Opposition to the policy has become the focus for a large number of protests across the country by both current university students, many school pupils and political allies of the student movement.

On the Nov. 10 demonstration, protestors occupied Millbank tower.
Image: Charlie Owen.

On November 10, between 30,000 and 52,000 protesters from across Britain marched through central London in a demonstration organised by the National Union of Students and the University and College Union, which represents teachers and lecturers in further and higher education. At the November 10 protest, a number of people occupied Millbank Tower, an office block which houses the Conservative Party. Fifty people were arrested and fourteen were injured. NUS president Aaron Porter condemned the attack and said it was caused by “those who are here to cause trouble”, and that the actions of a “minority of idiots” shouldn’t “undermine 50,000 who came to make a peaceful protest”.

Following the November 10 march, other protests have taken place across the country including an occupation at the University of Manchester, a sit-in at the John Owens Building in Manchester, and a demonstration at the University of Cambridge. A protest was also run outside the offices of The Guardian where Nick Clegg—who was giving a lecture inside the building—was executed in effigy while students protested “Nick Clegg, shame on you, shame on you for turning blue” (blue is the colour of the Conservative Party).

A graffitied police van in Trafalgar Square at the November 24 demonstration.
Image: yllA.

On November 24, a large number of protests took place across the country including a mass walk-out from universities and schools organised on Facebook, numerous university occupations, and demonstrations in Manchester, Cambridge, Birmingham, Leeds, Brighton and Cardiff, and a well-publicised occupation of University College London.

In London, a protest was planned to march down Whitehall to Parliament, but police held protesters in Trafalgar Square until they eventually broke free and ran around in a game of “cat and mouse” along the side streets around Charing Cross Road, Covent Garden and Picadilly Circus.

Simon Hardy from the National Campaign Against Fees and Cuts described the police response including the controversial ‘kettling’ of protesters as “absolutely outrageous”. Green MP Caroline Lucas raised the police response including the use of kettling in the House of Commons and stated that it was “neither proportionate, nor, indeed, effective”.

On November 30, protests continued in London culminating in 146 arrests of protesters in Trafalgar Square, and protests in Cardiff, Cambridge, Newcastle, Bath, Leeds, Sheffield, Edinburgh, Liverpool, Belfast, Brighton, Manchester and Bristol. Protesters in Sheffield attempted to invade and occupy Nick Clegg’s constituency office. Occupations of university buildings started or continued at University College London, Newcastle University, Cambridge University and Nottingham University, as well as council buildings in Oxford and Birmingham.

A “day of action” is being planned on December 8, the day before the Commons vote, by the National Union of Students.



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