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February 5, 2009

England’s Football Association complains over missed goal

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Thursday, February 5, 2009

The English Football Association (FA) has complained after broadcaster ITV cut away to an advertisement just before a winning goal in a match.

The match, an FA Cup Merseyside derby between Everton F.C. and Liverpool F.C., was in extra time after 118 minutes without a goal when ITV’s automated advertisement server, designed for use only during ordinary programming, began playing out commercials. In this time, Everton’s Dan Gosling scored the winning goal. In some regions with less adverts set up, the system returned to the match just before the goal, but viewers in the south of England saw only the celebrations after the goal.

Michael Grade, executive chairman of ITV, admitted to ITN that the broadcast had been a shambles and said that “yellow or red cards” would go to those responsible once it was established how it happened. ITV has received over 1,000 complaints. ITV has previously had issues with FA Cup coverage. The Histon F.C.Leeds United A.F.C. game managed to include swearing from Leeds fans and scenes of a naked player, whilst heavy rain marred picture quality.

Goodison Park, home of Everton FC
Image: BiloBlue.

The FA’s statement on this issue said “It is obviously very disappointing that viewers and fans did not see the only goal of last night’s FA Cup replay between Everton and Liverpool. Clearly we are seeking a full explanation from ITV as to why this happened. It is important that lessons are learned and that this does not happen again”.


Sources

  • “FA seek ITV explanation”. The Press Association, February 5, 2009
  • Mike Steere “Football Association furious over ‘missed’ goal”. CNN, February 5, 2009
  • David Byers and Dan Sabbagh “Michael Grade pledges ‘red cards’ as FA probe Everton goal blunder”. The Times, February 5, 2009
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

England’s Football Association complains over missed goal

Other stories from The United Kingdom
…More articles here
Location of the United Kingdom

A map showing the location of the United Kingdom



News from the United Kingdom

To write, edit, start or view other articles on the United Kingdom, see the United Kingdom Portal

Thursday, February 5, 2009

The English Football Association (FA) has complained after broadcaster ITV cut away to an advertisement just before a winning goal in a match.

Goodison Park, home of Everton FC
Image: BiloBlue.

The match, an FA Cup Merseyside derby between Everton F.C. and Liverpool F.C., was in extra time after 118 minutes without a goal when ITV’s automated advertisement server, designed for use only during ordinary programming, began playing out commercials. During this time, Everton’s Dan Gosling scored the winning goal. In some regions the system returned to the match just before the goal, but viewers in the south of England saw only the celebrations after the goal.

Michael Grade, executive chairman of ITV, admitted to ITN that the broadcast had been a shambles and said that “yellow or red cards” would go to those responsible once it was established how it happened. ITV has received over 1,000 complaints. ITV has previously had issues with FA Cup coverage. The Histon F.C.Leeds United A.F.C. game managed to include swearing from Leeds fans and scenes of a naked player, whilst heavy rain marred picture quality.

The FA’s statement on this issue said “It is obviously very disappointing that viewers and fans did not see the only goal of last night’s FA Cup replay between Everton and Liverpool. Clearly we are seeking a full explanation from ITV as to why this happened. It is important that lessons are learned and that this does not happen again”.


Sources

  • “FA seek ITV explanation”. The Press Association, February 5, 2009
  • Mike Steere “Football Association furious over ‘missed’ goal”. CNN, February 5, 2009
  • David Byers and Dan Sabbagh “Michael Grade pledges ‘red cards’ as FA probe Everton goal blunder”. The Times, February 5, 2009


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

November 19, 2008

UK football club criticized by council for attempting to trademark city’s bird

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

The Liver bird
Image: Chris Howells.

Liverpool FC, an association football club located in Liverpool, a British city, has been criticized by the city council for attempting to trademark the Liver Bird, a symbol used to represent the city of Liverpool, and it’s football club.

The council chamber of Liverpool’s town hall
Image: Man Vyi.

Flo Clucas, the Deputy leader of Liverpool City Council, expressed her concern over the move. “I have some very real concerns over it,” she stated. “They do already have their crest trademarked, but they have no right of ownership to claim the bird, or any version of the bird, as their own.”

“…Not only does it appear on the Royal Charter for the council, but it is also used by local businesses and schools,” she continued. “It belongs to the city and nobody has a right to claim it exclusively as the own. It’s a symbol for the city.”

The football club attempted to respond to these concerns by asserting that “Liverpool Football Club is seeking to trademark only its own specific version of the Liver Bird, to combat its use in counterfeit merchandise.”

However, Clucas stated that although “the club also says they have no intention of charging organisations that want to use it,” there is no guarantee that this will still be the case in the future, so, according to Clucas, residents of the city may have pay for the use of the bird in future if the trademark is approved.

The council is seeking legal advice over the application.

Sources

  • “Flap over Liverpool’s bird symbol”. BBC News Online, November 19, 2008
  • “Liverpool’s wings clipped in Liver Bird badge row”. Agence France-Presse, November 19, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

UK football club criticized by council for attempting to trademark city’s bird

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

The Liver bird
Image: Chris Howells.

Liverpool FC, an association football club located in Liverpool, a British city, has been criticized by the city council for attempting to trademark the Liver Bird, a symbol used to represent the city of Liverpool, and it’s football club.

The council chamber of Liverpool’s town hall
Image: Man Vyi.

Flo Clucas, the Deputy leader of Liverpool City Council, expressed her concern over the move. “I have some very real concerns over it,” she stated. “They do already have their crest trademarked, but they have no right of ownership to claim the bird, or any version of the bird, as their own.”

“…Not only does it appear on the Royal Charter for the council, but it is also used by local businesses and schools,” she continued. “It belongs to the city and nobody has a right to claim it exclusively as the own. It’s a symbol for the city.”

The football club attempted to respond to these concerns by asserting that “Liverpool Football Club is seeking to trademark only its own specific version of the Liver Bird, to combat its use in counterfeit merchandise.”

However, Clucas stated that although “the club also says they have no intention of charging organisations that want to use it,” there is no guarantee that this will still be the case in the future, so, according to Clucas, residents of the city may have pay for the use of the bird in future if the trademark is approved.

The council is seeking legal advice over the application.

Sources

  • “Flap over Liverpool’s bird symbol”. BBC News Online, November 19, 2008
  • “Liverpool’s wings clipped in Liver Bird badge row”. Agence France-Presse, November 19, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

UK football club criticized by council for attempting to trademark city’s bird

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

The Liver bird
Image: Chris Howells.

Liverpool FC, an association football club located in Liverpool, a British city, has been criticized by the city council for attempting to trademark the Liver Bird, a symbol used to represent the city of Liverpool, and it’s football club.

The council chamber of Liverpool’s town hall
Image: Man Vyi.

Flo Clucas, the Deputy leader of Liverpool City Council, expressed her concern over the move. “I have some very real concerns over it,” she stated. “They do already have their crest trademarked, but they have no right of ownership to claim the bird, or any version of the bird, as their own.”

“…Not only does it appear on the Royal Charter for the council, but it is also used by local businesses and schools,” she continued. “It belongs to the city and nobody has a right to claim it exclusively as the own. It’s a symbol for the city.”

The football club attempted to respond to these concerns by asserting that “Liverpool Football Club is seeking to trademark only its own specific version of the Liver Bird, to combat its use in counterfeit merchandise.”

However, Clucas stated that although “the club also says they have no intention of charging organisations that want to use it,” there is no guarantee that this will still be the case in the future, so, according to Clucas, residents of the city may have pay for the use of the bird in future if the trademark is approved.

The council is seeking legal advice over the application.

Sources

  • “Flap over Liverpool’s bird symbol”. BBC News Online, November 19, 2008
  • “Liverpool’s wings clipped in Liver Bird badge row”. Agence France-Presse, November 19, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

UK football club criticized by council for attempting to trademark city’s bird

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

The Liver bird
Image: Chris Howells.

Liverpool FC, an association football club located in Liverpool, a British city, has been criticized by the city council for attempting to trademark the Liver Bird, a symbol used to represent the city of Liverpool, and it’s football club.

The council chamber of Liverpool’s town hall
Image: Man Vyi.

Flo Clucas, the Deputy leader of Liverpool City Council, expressed her concern over the move. “I have some very real concerns over it,” she stated. “They do already have their crest trademarked, but they have no right of ownership to claim the bird, or any version of the bird, as their own.”

“…Not only does it appear on the Royal Charter for the council, but it is also used by local businesses and schools,” she continued. “It belongs to the city and nobody has a right to claim it exclusively as the own. It’s a symbol for the city.”

The football club attempted to respond to these concerns by asserting that “Liverpool Football Club is seeking to trademark only its own specific version of the Liver Bird, to combat its use in counterfeit merchandise.”

However, Clucas stated that although “the club also says they have no intention of charging organisations that want to use it,” there is no guarantee that this will still be the case in the future, so, according to Clucas, residents of the city may have pay for the use of the bird in future if the trademark is approved.

The council is seeking legal advice over the application.

Sources

  • “Flap over Liverpool’s bird symbol”. BBC News Online, November 19, 2008
  • “Liverpool’s wings clipped in Liver Bird badge row”. Agence France-Presse, November 19, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

UK football club criticized by council for attempting to trademark city’s bird

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

The Liver bird
Image: Chris Howells.

Liverpool FC, an association football club located in Liverpool, a British city, has been criticized by the city council for attempting to trademark the Liver Bird, a symbol used to represent the city of Liverpool, and it’s football club.

The council chamber of Liverpool’s town hall
Image: Man Vyi.

Flo Clucas, the Deputy leader of Liverpool City Council, expressed her concern over the move. “I have some very real concerns over it,” she stated. “They do already have their crest trademarked, but they have no right of ownership to claim the bird, or any version of the bird, as their own.”

“…Not only does it appear on the Royal Charter for the council, but it is also used by local businesses and schools,” she continued. “It belongs to the city and nobody has a right to claim it exclusively as the own. It’s a symbol for the city.”

The football club attempted to respond to these concerns by asserting that “Liverpool Football Club is seeking to trademark only its own specific version of the Liver Bird, to combat its use in counterfeit merchandise.”

However, Clucas stated that although “the club also says they have no intention of charging organisations that want to use it,” there is no guarantee that this will still be the case in the future, so, according to Clucas, residents of the city may have pay for the use of the bird in future if the trademark is approved.

The council is seeking legal advice over the application.

Sources

  • “Flap over Liverpool’s bird symbol”. BBC News Online, November 19, 2008
  • “Liverpool’s wings clipped in Liver Bird badge row”. Agence France-Presse, November 19, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

UK football club criticized by council for attempting to trademark city’s bird

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

The Liver bird
Image: Chris Howells.

Liverpool FC, an association football club located in Liverpool, a British city, has been criticized by the city council for attempting to trademark the Liver Bird, a symbol used to represent the city of Liverpool, and it’s football club.

The council chamber of Liverpool’s town hall
Image: Man Vyi.

Flo Clucas, the Deputy leader of Liverpool City Council, expressed her concern over the move. “I have some very real concerns over it,” she stated. “They do already have their crest trademarked, but they have no right of ownership to claim the bird, or any version of the bird, as their own.”

“…Not only does it appear on the Royal Charter for the council, but it is also used by local businesses and schools,” she continued. “It belongs to the city and nobody has a right to claim it exclusively as the own. It’s a symbol for the city.”

The football club attempted to respond to these concerns by asserting that “Liverpool Football Club is seeking to trademark only its own specific version of the Liver Bird, to combat its use in counterfeit merchandise.”

However, Clucas stated that although “the club also says they have no intention of charging organisations that want to use it,” there is no guarantee that this will still be the case in the future, so, according to Clucas, residents of the city may have pay for the use of the bird in future if the trademark is approved.

The council is seeking legal advice over the application.

Sources

  • “Flap over Liverpool’s bird symbol”. BBC News Online, November 19, 2008
  • “Liverpool’s wings clipped in Liver Bird badge row”. Agence France-Presse, November 19, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

UK football club criticized by council for attempting to trademark city’s bird

Filed under: Liverpool — admin @ 5:00 am

Wednesday, November 19, 2008

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The Liver bird
Image: Chris Howells.

Liverpool F.C., an association football club located in Liverpool, a British city, has been criticized by the city council for attempting to trademark the Liver Bird, a symbol used to represent the city of Liverpool, and its football club.

The council chamber of Liverpool’s town hall
Image: Man Vyi.

Flo Clucas, the Deputy leader of Liverpool City Council, expressed her concern over the move. “I have some very real concerns over it,” she stated. “They do already have their crest trademarked, but they have no right of ownership to claim the bird, or any version of the bird, as their own.”

“…Not only does it appear on the Royal Charter for the council, but it is also used by local businesses and schools,” she continued. “It belongs to the city and nobody has a right to claim it exclusively as the own. It’s a symbol for the city.”

The football club attempted to respond to these concerns by asserting that “Liverpool Football Club is seeking to trademark only its own specific version of the Liver Bird, to combat its use in counterfeit merchandise.”

However, Clucas stated that although “the club also says they have no intention of charging organisations that want to use it,” there is no guarantee that this will still be the case in the future, so, according to Clucas, residents of the city may have to pay for the use of the bird in the future if the trademark is approved.

The council is seeking legal advice over the application.

Liverpool F.C. formed in 1892, and is currently managed by Rafa Benitez. They have qualified for the Champions League in every one of the last four seasons, and they are currently second place in the English Premier League, and they have won five of their last six matches.

The club’s home ground is the Anfield stadium, and the main focus of their crest is the Liver Bird.

Sources

  • “Flap over Liverpool’s bird symbol”. BBC News Online, November 19, 2008
  • “Liverpool’s wings clipped in Liver Bird badge row”. Agence France-Presse, November 19, 2008
  • “Club Profile”. Premier League, Retrieved November 19, 2008


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

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