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December 14, 2011

Former Australian PM helps to launch \’anti-warmist manual\’

Former Australian PM helps to launch ‘anti-warmist manual’

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Wednesday, December 14, 2011

Education
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John Howard in Coffs Harbour, NSW Australia in March 2006.
Image: Orangemonkey.

Former Australian Prime Minister John Howard supported the launch of a new book “How to Get Expelled from School: A Guide to Climate Change for Pupils, Pundits and Parents”, authored by geology professor Ian Plimer. The book includes 101 questions for students to use to challenge their climate science teachers.

The book follows Professor Plimer’s 2009 “Heaven and Earth”. Professor Plimer said the previous book received feedback from parents concerned about education. This prompted him to address the next book to children. He said, “After Heaven and Earth came out I had many parents write to me and say, ‘Look, what do we do, our kids are being fed activism. I want my children to have the basics of scientists, I don’t want to be fed activism'”.

Mr Howard advocated emissions trading in 2007. He says he considered it feasible if the rest of the world acted too, otherwise to introduce carbon trading plans would risk Australian industries. “I proposed an emissions trading scheme and some people say, ‘Well why on earth did you do that?’ [It was] predicated on the rest of the world moving in the same direction and also predicated on a structure that would preserve the international competitiveness of those industries that gave our country a competitive trade advantage, it could do no harm”, he explained. “[It’s] hard to understand how we would do anything to put” Australia’s competitive advantage due to natural resources “at risk. The reality is we are doing that at the moment. The carbon tax is not being replicated in other countries.”

Professor Ian Enting, complex system scientist at the University of Melbourne, said the book includes scientific errors and insufficient references. Margaret Watts, president of the Science Teachers’ Association of New South Wales, said the educational bias claim is mistaken. “What science teachers do”, she said, “is put all of the facts, pro and con, against any topic, whatever it is, and show the children how to work through the evidence”.

Professor Plimer said of the 101 questions in his book, “They’re questions that kids should be asking of teachers, because if the teacher can answer it means they might know something about the subject. If they can’t, or start to promote ideology, it shows that our schools have been captured. Parents are telling me that schools have been captured by a lot of activists and kids are being fed stuff that is not relevant to the real world.”



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January 26, 2008

Australia to withdraw troops from Iraq this year

Australia to withdraw troops from Iraq this year

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Saturday, January 26, 2008

Stephen Smith, Australian Minister of Foreign Affairs.

Australia will press on with plans to withdraw its troops from Iraq in June this year, although promises were made by the nation’s foreign minister that relations with the United States will not be affected by the move.

Foreign minister Stephen Smith said that the withdrawal will be conducted in an orderly fashion to minimise inconvenience to other nations in Iraq. Speaking in New York as part of his first US visit since the election he said “We want to do that in a way which sees minimal disruption, which causes the least inconvenience to our allies there, both the United States and the United Kingdom.”

Australia currently has 550 troops in the country.

On Monday Smith will meet with Condoleezza Rice and others to discuss Afghanistan, where Australia also has troops stationed. It is currently the intention for this to remain the case.

Smith said of the effect on relations with the US – which have been strong since World War II – “It’s not something which I believe will disturb what to date has been a very good working relationship between the new government and the (U.S.) administration. It’s a very strong alliance – an alliance which transcends changes in governments. Administrations come and go, governments come and go, but the alliance is a long-term, enduring fundamental relationship between our two nations.”

The confirmation is important as Australia saw a new government elected in November. Prime Minister Kevin Rudd (Labour) defeated Conservative head and former PM John Howard. Howard is a supporter of US President George W. Bush and his government.



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November 4, 2007

Australia Votes 2007: Labor plan for home buyers

Australia Votes 2007: Labor plan for home buyers

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Sunday, November 4, 2007

Kevin Rudd, Australia’s Leader of the Opposition has promised a special home buyers’ bank account with tax concessions if Labor is elected on November 24.

Mr Rudd says AU$64,000 could be saved by a couple on the average wage over five years. The plan would cost the Government $600 million dollars.

The Housing Industry Association has welcomed the announcement but says it would be a start and would “avoid a stampede of first home buyers into the market.”

Prime Minister John Howard is bracing himself for a possible Wednesday interest rate rise which may decide the election. Howard has defended the rumours, saying that some rise would be ‘unavoidable’.

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Wikinews Australia has in-depth coverage of this issue: Election 2007
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October 14, 2007

Australian Prime Minister calls federal election

Filed under: Archived,Australia,John Howard,Politics and conflicts — admin @ 5:00 am

Australian Prime Minister calls federal election

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Sunday, October 14, 2007

John Howard in May 2006.

The Prime Minister of Australia, John Howard has announced that the Australian federal election will be held on November 24, 2007. Howard visited the Governor General of Australia Michael Jeffries earlier today and then announced the news.

Mr Howard, the Prime Minister of Australia for over ten years now, said that the country’s “best years lie ahead”, but only if the “right leadership” team is in power.

“Is it a Government that has a proven track record in those areas? Or is it an inexperienced group of men and women, 70 per cent of whom are former trade union officials?”, Mr Howard said. “The right leadership has the experience to further expand the prosperity of the Australian economy.”

“I believe very passionately that this country’s best years can lie ahead of us in the years immediately ahead,” he said. “In order for that to happen this country does not need new leadership, it does not need old leadership, it needs the right leadership.”

Mr Howard also stated that if his party, the Liberal Party is elected into government yet again, Peter Costello will hold the place of Treasurer of Australia and Alexander Downer will take the seat of the Minister for Foreign Affairs.

The Prime Minister announced that the writs will be issued on October 17. Consequently, following recent changes to the electoral act, Australians have until that date to ensure that they are on the electoral rolls and are able to have their vote. Voting is compulsory in Australian Federal elections.



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February 15, 2007

Australian PM visits New Zealand

Australian PM visits New Zealand – Wikinews, the free news source

Australian PM visits New Zealand

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Thursday, February 15, 2007

John Howard, Prime Minister of Australia.

Helen Clark, Prime Minister of New Zealand.

The Australian Prime Minister (PM), John Howard has arrived in New Zealand today for various duties.

While in New Zealand Mr Howard will talk to the New Zealand PM, Helen Clark; participate in a joint New Zealand and Australian CEO conference at Wellington’s Victoria University; open the new high commission for Australia in Thorndon; lay a wreath at the Tomb of the Unknown Warrior; and talk to the leader of New Zealand’s opposition party, National, John Key.

Ms Clark has said that their talks will cover various topics, including trade, global warming, problems in the Solomon Islands, Fiji, and the settling of Tonga, and about New Zealand’s apples continuing to be banned in Australia. They will also talk about other regional, and international topics. Keith Locke, Green party member, is urging that Ms Clark talks to Mr Howard about sensitive issues, including urging Australia to withdraw from Iraq, release David Hicks from Guantanamo Bay, and Australia not ratifying the Kyoto Protocol. Mr Howard said, “We remain quite concerned about Fiji and will compare notes and talk about that as well as other bilateral issues.”

Mr Howard said that the relationship between himself and Ms Clark are good. “We put aside any ideological differences we might have and we focus very much on getting good results.” He also said that the relationship between Australia and New Zealand “…has got a lot of history, it has got a lot of common culture, it has got a lot of common sporting endeavour. But, like all close relationships, if you take them for granted they tend to fray at the edges over time.”

Mr Howard will return to Australia on Friday.

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February 12, 2007

Australian Prime Minister targets Obama on Iraq

Australian Prime Minister targets Obama on Iraq

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Monday, February 12, 2007

Australian PM, John Howard

Australian Prime Minister John Howard has attacked US presidential candidate Barack Obama on his pledge to introduce a bill that would withdraw American troops from Iraq by March 2008.

On Sunday, Prime Minister Howard said the move would hand victory to insurgents in Iraq. “I think that would just encourage those who wanted completely to destabilise and destroy Iraq, and create chaos and victory for the terrorists to hang on and hope for (an) Obama victory,” Mr Howard said.

Cquote1.svg If I was running al-Qaeda in Iraq, I would put a circle around March 2008, and pray, as many times as possible, for a victory not only for Obama, but also for the Democrats. Cquote2.svg

—John Howard, Australia Prime Minister

“If I was running al-Qaeda in Iraq, I would put a circle around March 2008, and pray, as many times as possible, for a victory not only for Obama, but also for the Democrats.”

Mr Obama dismissed Howard’s comments as “empty rhetoric”, unless he was to send another 20,000 Australians to fight in Iraq. “So, if he’s (inaudible) if to fight the good fight in Iraq, I would suggest that he calls up another 20,000 Australians and sends them to Iraq. I would also note that we have close to 140,000 troops on the ground now, and my understanding is that Mr Howard has deployed 1,400”, said Mr Obama.

The Australian government said its contribution to the war in Iraq was appropriate given Australia’s population and military size and that Obama’s response failed to address the “substance of the issue”. Foreign Minister Alexander Downer said 20,000 troops would be “half of our army”.

Mr Howard, considered a close ally of the United States government, has faced attacks and support from US politicians.

US Presidential contender, Barack Obama

Democrat Terry McAuliffe said “Firstly, the Prime Minister has been a great friend of George Bush’s. He has been with him lock-step from day one on this war in Iraq.”

Republican presidential candidate Duncan Hunter said Howard had earned a right to comment about Obama’s policy “I think the Aussies have earned a right to comment on the world stage about their partner in this endeavour, because they’ve been fighting side-by-side with us in Iraq,” said Hunter.

“And so I think that John Howard, while it wasn’t a very complimentary statement, he is basically stating the truth and that is that what we say on the Senate floor on or the House floor goes to a world audience.”

“And it has an impact on not only our allies, but also our adversaries.”

Roy Ryden, another US Democrat said Mr Howard’s comment was “bizarre” and accused the Prime minister of interfering with US politics “The most charitable thing you can say about Mr Howard’s comment is bizarre. You know, we’ll make our own judgements in this country with respect to elections and Barack Obama is a terrific public servant.”

Mr Howard has drawn criticism from some conservative Republicans with John Cornyn saying Howard should stay out of US domestic politics.

The Australian Prime Minster further defended his statement today, claiming Obama’s plan threatened Australia’s national security.

“If the United States were to withdraw her combat units from Iraq by the early part of next year it could only be represented as a defeat for the United States in Iraq,” he said.

“I hold the strongest possible view that it is contrary to the security interests of this country for America to be defeated in Iraq.”

Australia’s strong links to the United States and its support for the U.S.-led war on Iraq were key issues for Howard’s fourth straight election win in late 2004. The Australian opposition has used the comments as an opportunity to attack the government. Opposition leader Kevin Rudd said Howard needed to avoid taking sides in American politics as it was important for the Australia-U.S. alliance that leaders could deal with each other despite their political affiliations.

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August 21, 2006

Australia to detain Burmese boatpeople on Nauru

Australia to detain Burmese boatpeople on Nauru

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Monday, August 21, 2006

Location of remote island of Nauru, where Australia is sending 8 Burmese refugees

Eight Burmese boat people, who arrived off Western Australia’s Ashmore Reef last week, say they wish to claim refugee status. The group of 8 men, aged between 24 and 40, are being held in detention on Christmas Island by the Australian Federal Government. They will be sent to Nauru after identity interviews and medical checks are completed.

According to The Age newspaper, the men are from a refugee camp on the Thai-Burmese border, and may be from the Karen tribe, who are battling Burma’s brutal military Government. Karen rebels have been at war with the central Government for 57 years.

An Immigration department spokesman confirmed that the eight men claimed to be from Burma. Two of the men have contacted immigration lawyers, seeking assistance with asylum claims. David Manne, from Melbourne-based Refugee and Immigration Legal Centre, said the other six were likely to do the same. “There’s a very strong likelihood that they are genuine refugees,” he said.

The men were first spotted by the Australian Customs Service at Ashmore Reef, 610km north of Broome, WA on August 13. They were sent by Navy vessel to Christmas Island – 2,400 km northwest of Perth, WA. The men have been held since Friday as part of the Howard Government’s Pacific Solution to keep asylum seekers out of the country.

In 2005, the Department of Immigration began construction of an Immigration Reception and Processing Centre on Christmas Island, due for completion late in 2006. The facility is estimated to cost $210 million, and will contain 800 beds.

No Legal Recourse for Burmese

The news of the boat people’s arrival became public last week as Prime Minister John Howard scrapped controversial new migration laws. The proposed laws would have excised the Australian mainland for immigration purposes.

Burma

Ashmore Reef, already excised from Australia’s migration zone, means the men have no legal entitlement to be brought to Australia for processing. They have no access to the Australian court system to argue their claims or contest the rulings of the Immigration Department.

Mr Manne said he was concerned that the circumstances of the men’s confinement could hamper their attempts to communicate with lawyers. He said the Burmese men should be afforded the same rights as the West Papuans or Vietnamese asylum-seekers who recently made it to Australian shores. “It’s absolutely crucial these people be given a fair go, so that they can actually speak with us properly about the issues,” he said. Mr Manne says he has made several requests of the Department of Immigration in Canberra.

“They’re asylum seekers… they believe that they’d be persecuted if sent to Burma, and we have agreed to act on their behalf.” He was unable to say whether the group was dropped off by people smugglers, as Immigration Minister Senator Amanda Vanstone claims.

“What we do know is they’re seeking refugee status, that is, protection from brutal human rights abuse,” he said. The Burmese regime has recently waged an aggressive attack on Karen insurgents – forcing thousands of villagers to hide in the jungle or seek refuge in Thailand. There are 140,000 refugees in seven camps along the Thai-Burma border.

Australian Greens Senator Kerry Nettle says the government must allow the Burmese group to be brought to Australia to process the asylum-seeker’s claims. “The government needs to ensure that all asylum seekers are offered legal support,” she said. “The best way to ensure the Burmese asylum seekers have full access to their lawyer is to bring them to Australia while their asylum claims are assessed.”

Nauru

File:Nauru-airphoto.jpg
Nauru

Meanwhile the near-bankrupt Nauru Government has urged Australia to “speed up asylum seeker processing” in their country. Nauru says Australia is taking far too long to process asylum seekers. Currently two refugees remain on Nauru – both Iraqi men. The men have been held in detention on the remote tiny island for five years.

According to The Age, the Nauru Government has approved a plan to impose financial penalties on Australia if asylum seekers are forced to languish on the near-bankrupt island. The report says if they have not been processed and either returned or resettled within three months, their visas will have to be renewed each month, with the cost increasing by $500 for each renewal.

Nauru’s Foreign Minister David Adeang raised serious concerns about the mental state of the detainees. He says Muhammad Faisal’s condition worsened sharply after he was re-interviewed by ASIO. Mr Adeang has asked for the Government to evacuate the Mr Faisal immediately, he says he is also concerned about the mental health of the other Iraqi man left on Nauru. The Australian Government claims advice from ASIO that the man may be a “security threat.”

Nauru is the world’s smallest island nation, covering just 21 km². Since 2001 it has accepted aid from the Australian government. In exchange for this aid, Nauru houses an ‘offshore’ detention centre for Australia.

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June 21, 2006

Australia\’s Old Parliament House becomes heritage listed

Australia’s Old Parliament House becomes heritage listed

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Wednesday, June 21, 2006

Old Parliament House – now protected under federal heritage laws

Australian Prime Minister John Howard announced on Tuesday that Old Parliament House in Canberra has been heritage listed. It is the 31st entry on the National Heritage List.

The listing acknowledges the role the building has in shaping Australia’s culture and protects it from being modified in any way which could affect its historic value.

Old Parliament House served as the home of Australia’s parliament from 1927 until 1988, when it was relocated to the present parliament house. From 1901-1927, parliament met in Melbourne in the Victorian Parliament House (the state parliament was relocated for 26 years). Before being known as Old Parliament House, the building was known as Provisional Parliament House – as it was intended to be used for 50 years before a permanent building could be built.

In the 61 years the building was used as the seat of parliament, the government changed only seven times, and several new political parties were formed (the Liberals, Anti-Communist Labor Party, and the Australian Democrats).

Mr Howard said the building played an important part in Australia’s political history. “Old Parliament House will always be an important part of our political history with its rich collection of original furniture, art and memorabilia helping to illustrate the story of Australia’s political customs and functions,” he said.

According to Mr Howard, the National Heritage List lists sites which have helped shape the country. “The National Heritage List contains places that have played an important role in the development of our nation, such as Captain Cook’s landing place in New South Wales, Port Arthur in Tasmania and the Australian War Memorial in Canberra,” said the Prime Minister.

The building currently houses Australia’s National Portrait Gallery, and serves as a venue for receptions and exhbitions.

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June 15, 2006

Australian PM should convert to Islam: Bashir

Australian PM should convert to Islam: Bashir

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Thursday, June 15, 2006

Location map of Indonesia’s Central Java province

Abu Bakar Bashir, the alleged spiritual leader of the Jemaah Islamiyah militant islamic organisation gave an address on return to his school in Surakarta in Central Java where he urged Australian Prime Minister John Howard to convert to Islam.

Speaking outside his school (considered by many to be a terrorism finishing school), before thousands of students and onlookers, Bashir said “If John Howard wants to be safe and avoid going to hell, I suggest he convert to Islam.”

Mr Bashir also urged Mr Howard, the United States and other “infidels” not to fight the Muslim world. “Maybe with God’s permission they can kill us, but they certainly can’t beat Islam,” said Mr Bashir.

The Islamic cleric denied having links to JI or any other terrorist organisation saying that Western media had been “twisting his beliefs”. He dismissed claims by the US and Australia that he is the spiritual leader of JI.

Mr Bashir said that the Islamic militants involved in the 2002 Bali Bombing has taken the wrong path, but stopped short of condemning their actions. “Their wrong step was to use a bomb as a weapon in a safe area,” he said.

“Bombs are only to be used in conflict areas.”

“In safe areas just preach, and we don’t need bombs like that.”

Related Wikinews

Alleged spiritual leader of Jemaah Islamiyah freed from prison” — Wikinews, June 14, 2006

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June 5, 2006

Australian nuclear power plants rejected by states

Australian nuclear power plants rejected by states

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Monday, June 5, 2006

Wikinews Australia has in-depth coverage of this issue: Australian nuclear debate

Australian media reports that Prime Minister John Howard is expected to push a nuclear energy inquiry through federal cabinet this week. Meanwhile, a list of possible sites for nuclear reactors has been leaked by the Opposition to media. The locations, listed in 1997, include Adelaide, Darwin, Perth, Lucas Heights, Goulburn, Holsworthy, and Broken Hill in New South Wales and other sites.

West Australian (WA) premier Alan Carpenter says the list of fourteen potential sites were a “facade to soften up Western Australians into accepting a nuclear waste dump.” The WA Premier said people would not only be surprised but “stunned to learn that the federal cabinet considered possible sites… without disclosing them to any state government.”

Mr Carpenter said in a media release that the document mentions a site near Perth airport. “People should wake up to what’s happening around Australia, particularly in WA,” said Mr. Carpenter. “Only a few weeks ago, we had three prominent WA Liberal MPs supporting a nuclear waste dump in WA,” he said. “This is all a facade in the Howard Government’s push to soften up West Australians for a nuclear waste dump.”

Premier Carpenter, whose Labor government stridently opposes uranium mining in WA, stated his opposition to a nuclear waste dump: “I vehemently oppose the prospect of our State becoming the dumping ground for the world’s nuclear waste and that is what will happen if we allow uranium mining in WA. The evidence is mounting and indisputable.”

The South Australian Government has ruled out any possible nuclear power plant in SA. “A nuclear power plant would bankrupt our state,” SA Premier Mike Rann said. “It would not be commercially viable and would not, in my view, be acceptable to the public. Nuclear power plants need giant populations to sustain them, there is no-one coming to me from the commercial sector or the mining industry or anywhere else, suggesting a nuclear power plant.”

Earlier, Foreign Affairs Minister Alexander Downer said South Australia should build a nuclear power station to run a desalination plant. Premier Rann dismissed the idea as ridiculous and said comments by Mr Downer highlight divisions within Federal Cabinet. He said Mr Downer is at odds with the Federal Finance Minister Nick Minchin, who says the high costs of nuclear power would rule it out.

Nuclear symbol.jpg

Mr Rann says South Australia will not allow nuclear power. “For once I’m agreeing with Nick Minchin,” he said. “I think Nick Minchin is right that a nuclear power plant isn’t necessary and won’t happen and I think that Alexander Downer is having a bit of a lend of him.”

Victoria’s Energy Minister Theo Theophanous said nuclear energy in Australia did not make sense when the cost and problems of waste disposal were considered. Mr Theophanous has rejected a report that found nuclear power could be competitive with conventional energy generation if it was subsided with help from a taxpayer subsidy.

A recent report found nuclear power could compete with gas or coal-fired electricity if taxpayers helped to pay for it or shouldered the risk of its production. The ANSTO report found nuclear plants could be built in the next 10 to 15 years and an Australian version would cost about $2.5 billion to establish. To make it viable, taxpayers would pay hundreds of million towards start-up costs, said the report.

But Mr Theophanous said Victoria had already had concluded the nuclear proposal did not add up. “I had my department look at this and provide a report to me more than a year ago in relation to the prospect of nuclear power,” he said. “The problem is a commercial one as much as anything else. It costs roughly double the price to produce power out of nuclear energy. If you’re going to pay double the price, why not put in wind farms? Why not use renewable energy, which is even cheaper than nuclear energy?” said Mr Theophanous .

The Victoria Government urges householders to reduce greenhouse emissions by reducing daily energy consumption. A new campaign identifies simple measures residents can adopt to cut power bills and greenhouse emissions, including turning the heating thermostat to no more than 20C, washing clothes in cold water and turning appliances off at the switch when they are not being used.

New South Wales Premier Morris Iemma has also declared his opposition to nuclear power. He said no nuclear power stations would be built in NSW as long as he is premier. Mr Iemma urged state opposition leader Peter Debnam to join him in opposing the construction of nuclear power plants in NSW. “While ever I’m premier of NSW there won’t be any nuclear power plants in NSW,” he told reporters.

Queensland Premier Peter Beattie says he “would not jeopardize the state’s coal industry by supporting a nuclear power plant.” Mr. Beattie has ruled out uranium mining in Queensland to protect the state’s huge coal industry. He said he would not support a nuclear power plant. “The State Government would not support it,” Mr. Beattie said.

“We have the power to block them and we would block them, we would not support nuclear power. Why would we have a nuclear reactor in competition with the coal industry?” Mr. Beattie told media.

Climate change

The Australian Conservation Foundation (ACF) chairman Don Henry says a nuclear debate must consider climate change. “If the inquiry is just about nuclear power it will be a waste of taxpayers money because nuclear power is too dangerous, too dirty, and too slow to tackle climate change,” he said. “If the inquiry is going to be fairdinkum, it needs to look at that issue: what can we do right now to tackle climate change in Australia?”

Australian Greens climate change and energy spokesperson Senator Christine Milne said in a media release: “Instead of turning to nuclear power, Australia should ratify the Kyoto Protocol, invest in renewable energy, adopt a national energy efficiency target and improve public transport. “Several studies examining options to achieve deep cuts in Australian greenhouse emissions all show this goal can be achieved, cost effectively, without resorting to nuclear power.”

Greens Senator Rachel Siewert says: “The nuclear industry is engaged in a concerted effort to be given one last chance for redemption… yet every step of the nuclear fuel chain, from mining, milling, enrichment and operating reactors to waste storage, is subject to the same human error, material breakdowns, complexity and incompetence as any other area of human endeavour.” said Senator Siewert. “The current inventory of nuclear waste will already present our descendents with a monstrous intergenerational headache. Allowing so much as a kilogram more of this material to be produced is simply immoral.”

The ACF say “nuclear energy is not a solution to climate change.” ACF President Professor Ian Lowe says “Nuclear is too slow to provide any legitimate answer to climate change or to energy security for the developing world.” The ACF report that, as an energy source globally, uranium provides less power than renewables do. “Uranium is inextricably linked to very serious environmental and health problems via nuclear weapons and radioactive waste. There is nothing ideological about opposing its use…”

Nuclear inquiry

Centrifuges used to produce enriched uranium

The Australian Newspaper reports that Prime Minister Howard is preparing to appoint chief scientist Jim Peacock, a supporter of nuclear power, and other high-level nuclear industry experts to the team. The public inquiry, to be undertaken by three or four selected experts is expected to “examine the economics of nuclear energy, health, safety, environmental and proliferation issues as well as waste and storage.” The taskforce will take submissions and is expected to prepare a report to Government within four or five months, with the Government’s response early in 2007.

The Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Ian Smith, says “at least three” power plants would be required. Mr Howard said the ANSTO report challenged the view that the cost of nuclear power was prohibitive. Dr Smith told a Senate estimates hearing that Australia would require “multiple power stations to make the industry viable”.

Federal Industry Minister Ian Macfarlane said the nuclear energy inquiry would also include consideration of nuclear enrichment plants in Australia. Mr Macfarlane said he would consider a nuclear power plant in his own Toowoomba electorate.

Prime Minister John Howard insisted he would not be deterred by the unpopularity of nuclear power.

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