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December 1, 2012

Bird flu outbreak kills birds in Krasnodar region

Bird flu outbreak kills birds in Krasnodar region

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Saturday, December 1, 2012

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A coot
Image: Axel Mauruszat.

Temryuk (green) and Anapa (red) districts

Krasnodar, Russia officials said yesterday they have found roughly 4,000 dead wild birds in the region. Doctors identified the disease as bird flu subtype H5. Officials said the outbreak originated with coots in water reservoirs at the west of the region.

The Krasnodar leading veterinary physician, George Gzhailidi, said the bird flu outbreak originated with coots in the Temryuksky District and Anapsky District. The region governor Alexander Nikolayevich Tkachyov said, “At risk is the health and safety of people, of everybody who lives in the region. This is why I make the decision to ban hunting in the districts with mass mortality of wild birds — Temryuk[sky District] and Anap[sky District]. Also, a quarantine is being declared for these areas.”((ru))

Officials started emergency vaccinations of birds on local farms. Officials are also carrying out emergency vaccination of humans in the area.



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Bird flu outbreak in Krasnodar region

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Saturday, December 1, 2012

Russia
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Location of Russia

A map showing the location of Russia

More information on Russia:
  • Russia
  • Culture
  • Demographics
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  • Geography
  • History
  • Politics

A coot
Image: Axel Mauruszat.

Temryuk (green) and Anapa (red) districts

Krasnodar, Russia officials found over 1,500 dead wild birds in the region. Doctors identified the disease as bird flu subtype H5. Officials said the outbreak originated with coots in water reservoirs at the east of the region.

The Krasnodar leading veterinary physician, George Gzhailidi, said the bird flu outbreak originated with coots in the Temryuksky District and Anapsky District. The region governor Alexander Nikolayevich Tkachyov said, “At risk is the health and safety of people, of everybody who lives in the region. This is why I make the decision to ban hunting in the districts with mass mortality of wild birds — Temryuk[sky District] and Anap[sky District]. Also, a quarantine is being declared for these areas.”((ru))

Officials started emergency vaccinations of birds on local farms. Officials are also carrying out emergency vaccination of humans in the area.



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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

April 19, 2009

65th human bird flu case reported In Egypt

Filed under: Avian Flu,Disease,Health,World — admin @ 5:00 am

Sunday, April 19, 2009

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More information on H5N1:
Past & Potential Flu Pandemics

Disease Year Death toll
Spanish Flu 1918/1919 50 million
Asian Flu 1957 1 million
Hong Kong Flu 1968 1 million
H5N1 Ongoing 257

The Egyptian Health Ministry stated Friday that a 25-year-old woman from a northern neighborhood in the capital of Cairo had contracted the deadly H5N1 strain of the bird flu. Health Ministry spokesman Abdel Rahman Shahine said the woman had started to show symptoms on April 7 after coming into contact with dead birds.

Some 23 Egyptians have died after contracting the virus. Most came into contact with infected domestic birds in a country where roughly 5 million households depend on domestically raised poultry as a significant source of food and income.

The World Health Organization (WHO) said this month it was concerned some Egyptians may carry the bird flu virus without showing symptoms, which could give it more of a chance to mutate to a strain that spreads easily among humans.

According to the latest statistics of the WHO on its website, some 418 people in 15 countries and regions have contracted the virus and 257 of them died of the disease.


Sources

  • Sun Yang “Egypt Reports 65th Human Case of Bird Flu”. Xinhua, April 18, 2009
  • “Cumulative Number of Confirmed Human Cases of Avian Influenza A/(H5N1) Reported to WHO”. World Health Organization, April 17, 2009
  • Will Rasmussen “Egyptian woman contracts bird flu”. Reuters, April 15, 2009


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April 6, 2009

Six-year-old Egyptian boy contracts bird flu

Six-year-old Egyptian boy contracts bird flu

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Monday, April 6, 2009

The Egyptian Health Ministry reported on Sunday that a six-year-old Egyptian boy contracted bird flu, the sixth such incident in a month. The child was hospitalised on March 28, reported to be in critical condition after treatment, and is breathing with an artificial respirator.

The state news agency MENA revealed that the boy’s name was Ali Mahmoud Ali Somaa, and that he was from Qalyubia, a province located along the Nile Delta, located about forty kilometres north of Egypt’s capital of Cairo.

The death toll of the cases of the bird flu virus in humans in Egypt is 23, with the first incident reported in March 2006.

Statistics from the World Health Organisation’s (WHO) website say that 413 people in fifteen countries have been infected with the H5N1 virus; out of those, 256 have died.



Sources

Wikipedia-logo.png Bird flu on Wikipedia.

More information on H5N1:
  • Avian flu
  • H5N1
  • H5N1 genetic structure
  • Transmission and infection of H5N1
Related stories
Past & Potential Flu Pandemics

Disease Year Death toll
Spanish Flu 1918/1919 50 million
Asian Flu 1957 1 million
Hong Kong Flu 1968 1 million
H5N1 Ongoing 243

 

 

 


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December 21, 2008

Taiwan culls 18000 chickens due to H5N2 virus outbreak

Taiwan culls 18000 chickens due to H5N2 virus outbreak

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Sunday, December 21, 2008

3D Modell Influenzavirus.

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New outbreaks of H5N2 have been confirmed in Taiwan. Council of Agriculture (COA) Minister Chen Wu-hsiung has confirmed on Saturday that “the recent chicken deaths at a poultry farm in Kaohsiung County’s Luchu Township (on October 21) were caused by the low-pathogenic H5N2 bird flu virus, that is not communicable to humans.” They had slaughtered 18,000 chickens on November 14. “The problem has been resolved,” he said. COA has been monitoring wild and migratory birds and said “it is still investigating the source of the infection.”

Lujhu Township (蘆竹鄉) is a rural township in northwestern Taoyuan County in Taiwan. It is located at kilometer 49 of the Highway no.1, close to the Taiwan Taoyuan International Airport (IATA: TPE). Kaohsiung County (高雄縣, Gāoxióng Xiàn, Gaosyóng Siàn, Kao-hsiung Hsien; Ko-hiông-kōan) is a county in southern Taiwan administered as a County of Taiwan. It encloses but does not include Kaohsiung City.

Mr Huang Kwo-ching, deputy director of the Bureau of Animal and Plant Health Inspection and Quarantine, however, said, “we took the most stringent measures in dealing with the episode as according to the rules of the World Organisation for Animal Health (OIE), there was no need to slaughter those chickens.”

A transmission electron micrograph of influenza A virus, late passage.

H5N2 is a subtype of the species Influenzavirus A (avian influenza virus or bird flu virus). A highly pathogenic strain of H5N2 caused bird flu outbreaks with significant spread to numerous farms, resulting in great economic losses in 1983 in Pennsylvania, USA in chickens and turkeys, in 1994 in Mexico in chickens and a minor outbreak in 1997 in Italy in chickens.

Deputy Minister Hu Sing-hwa (胡興華) explained that “after viral separation and cultivation, second results showed that the chickens had a H5N2 Intravenous Pathogenicity Index [IVPI] of 0.89, which makes it low-pathogenic,” adding that “We will also continue to monitor the 76 chicken farms around the affected farm for three months.”

Taiwan has thus stopped its poultry exports for at least three months.

Meanwhile, Taiwan News has reported that “Japan has banned the imports of Taiwan’s poultry. Being the biggest duck provider to Japan, Taiwan exports 5,000 tons of duck annually worth US$23 million (approximately NT$750 million). For the time being, US$4 million (NT$130 million) worth of duck in the process of shipping, customs clearance is expected to be affected.” For this reason, COA has promised to subsidize poultry farmers affected by the virus which broke out on October 21. H5N2 avian flu strain first broke out in Taiwan in January 2004.



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Wikipedia Learn more about Influenza A virus subtype H5N2 and Taiwan on Wikipedia.
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May 23, 2008

Bangladesh reports first human case of H5N1 bird flu

Bangladesh reports first human case of H5N1 bird flu

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Friday, May 23, 2008

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Bangladesh reported its first human case of the H5N1 strain of Avian flu on Thursday. According to a representative of the Bangladesh health ministry, the 16-month old boy initially tested negative for the disease. His virus culture tested positive in tests performed by the United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The boy is from the capital city of Dhaka in the Dhaka District.

Colorized transmission electron micrograph of Avian influenza A H5N1 viruses (seen in gold) grown in MDCK cells (seen in green).
Image: Cynthia Goldsmith.

“Although there is no farm in the neighbourhood we suspect that he got the illness after his family bought chickens from a farm,” said senior health ministry official Mahmudur Rahman. Rahman is the head of Bangladesh’s Institute of Epidemiology and Disease Control and Research. He asserted that the government had the disease under control, and that physicians and hospitals in the country were adequately prepared.

Rahman said Thursday that the child had recovered from the disease. “The child was found infected by H5N1 but after treatment he has recovered and is now doing well,” said Rahman in a statement to Reuters.

The World Health Organization (WHO) confirmed the positive test results on Friday. This case in Bangladesh brings the total number of countries in the world with human infections from the disease up to 15. “When a disease is so widespread in poultry, it is really a matter of time before you get a human case. It shows the need to control the disease in animals if you are going to reduce the chances of transmission to humans,” said WHO spokesman Gregory Hartl in a statement to Reuters.

Cquote1.svg There is no reason to panic. The child contracted the H5N1 bird flu virus in January but we only got confirmation from the CDC on Wednesday it was a human bird flu case. Cquote2.svg

—Saluddin Khan, Bangladesh government official

The boy had previously been diagnosed with H5N1 in January, but the CDC only confirmed the case this week. In a statement in Agence France-Presse, senior government official Saluddin Khan said: “There is no reason to panic. The child contracted the H5N1 bird flu virus in January but we only got confirmation from the CDC on Wednesday it was a human bird flu case.”

Khan commented on preventative measures being taken by the government, saying, “we’re destroying the birds and eggs as soon as we have any report of bird flu at any farm in the country.”

Bangladesh was first hit by bird flu in February 2007, and after a period of dormancy, was hit again in January 2008. Outbreaks subsided in March when peaking temperatures killed off the virus. Over one million birds were slaughtered during the outbreaks, and at the peak the outbreaks were the cause of a loss 1.5 million jobs in the Bangladesh poultry industry, which is the largest in the world. The Avian influenza has spread through 47 of Bangladesh’s 64 districts.

The H5N1 virus seldom infects humans, but according to WHO there have been 382 human cases globally since 2003, including 241 deaths.



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Influenza A virus subtype H5N1
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March 13, 2008

H5N1 Avian Flu virus has mutated, study says

H5N1 Avian Flu virus has mutated, study says

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Thursday, March 13, 2008

Researchers involved in a study at the University of Wisconsin have discovered that the H5N1 Avian Flu virus has mutated into a strain that may make humans more vulnerable to the disease.

Prior to the study, it was known that the virus could only thrive or live in a body which have temperatures of 106°F (41°C). A human’s normal body temperature is 98.6°F (37°C). This difference in the temperatures of bodies makes the virus less likely to infect a human, but the recent study suggests the virus has adapted to survive in bodies with temperatures lower than 106°F.

“We have identified a specific change that could make bird flu grow in the upper respiratory tract of humans,” said Yoshihiro Kawaoka, the researcher in charge of the study.

Kawaoka also stated that the “viruses that are circulating in Africa and Europe are the ones closest to becoming a human virus,” but also stated that the H5N1 virus must undergo several mutations before it can infect a human, who can then spread the virus to other humans.

“Clearly there are more mutations that are needed. We don’t know how many mutations are needed for them to become pandemic strains,” added Kawaoka.

The World Health Organization (WHO) has stated that despite the study, influenza viruses are constantly mutating from season to season, but that the H5N1 virus is not anymore deadly to humans than before the study.

“Mutations occur in influenza viruses. Separately from that, the (bird flu) virus continues to be deadly. But there is no new jump in deadliness,” said Gregory Hartl, a spokesman for the WHO.



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March 1, 2008

Wild Canadian Goose tests positive for H5N1 in England

Wild Canadian Goose tests positive for H5N1 in England

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Saturday, March 1, 2008

The H5N1 Avian Flu virus has been found in a dead wild Canadian Goose in Abbotsbury Swannery in Dorset, England. This is the eleventh case of the virus turning up in wild birds. The goose was discovered on February 25, 2008.

“The finding of more cases in wild birds is not unexpected … We are currently considering whether any additional restrictions are necessary in the area,” said the United Kingdom’s Health Ministry in a statement to the media.

As a result of the finding, poultry movement has now been restricted by the Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) in the areas surrounding the Swannery. The removal of all birds, dead or alive from any property now requires a license. DEFRA says the restrictions will expire no earlier than 31 days.

Ten other cases of the virus have appeared in dead birds, all Mute Swans from the same area.



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January 29, 2008

Indonesia reports 100th human death from bird flu

Filed under: Archived,Asia,Avian Flu,Disease,Health,Indonesia,Influenza,World — admin @ 5:00 am

Indonesia reports 100th human death from bird flu

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Avian Flu
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More information on H5N1:
  • Avian flu
  • H5N1
  • H5N1 genetic structure
  • Transmission and infection of H5N1

Tuesday, January 29, 2008

Two people, a nine year old boy and a 23-year-old woman from Jakarta in Indonesia, have died from the H5N1 Avian Flu virus marking the country’s 100th death from the disease. Both died on Sunday, January 27.

“The woman died yesterday, but we just received the results that she’s positive with bird flu. The total number of deaths is now 100 out of 124 positive cases,” said National Bird Flu Center spokesman, Joko Suyono.

Nearly half of all humans that died from H5N1, have been from Indonesia. Nearly half of those infected in the country received the virus from poultry that was contaminated with the virus.

So far, 223 people from 13 different nations around the world have died from H5N1.



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December 31, 2007

Egyptian woman becomes third to die of bird flu in a week

Egyptian woman becomes third to die of bird flu in a week

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Monday, December 31, 2007

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More information on H5N1:
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  • Transmission and infection of H5N1

A woman in Egypt has died of the H5N1 strain of bird flu. H5N1 has killed two other Egyptian women already this week, bringing the total dead of the virus in Egypt to 18.

Fardous Mahammed Hadad was taken into hospital on Sunday after having difficulty breathing and developing a high fever, and subsequently tested positive for bird flu. She died today, at the age of 36.

As well as Hadad, who was from Menoufia, this week saw the deaths of Fatima Fathi Mohammed from Daqahliya and Ola Youness Mohammed from Beni Suef. They all died from H5N1; Ola Youness Mohammed’s case was Egypt’s first since July. In addition, the World Health Organisation says two further woman are infected without giving any further details; the United Nations health agency says that on December 24 a 50-year-old woman was hospitalised and remains in critical condition, whilst a chicken seller, 22, is recovering from the infection in intensive care.

Egypt’s Ministry of Health has recorded a total of 42 confirmed cases of H5N1 infection, including the 18 fatal cases. Most of the cases, including the latest death, were females who had daily contact with chickens or turkeys, most keeping the animals in their back yards. Egypt’s first case of bird flu was in February 2006.

Bird flu began in Asia in 2003, and since then has spread across 45 countries worldwide, killed at least 212 people of 340 infections and triggered the killing of millions of birds. Egypt is one of the worst-hit non-Asian countries, due in part to a combination of its location along the paths taken by many migratory birds and the fact that many people keep fowl close to their homes. It is feared that if the virus mutates into a form that can be easily transferred from human to human the result could be a global pandemic causing millions of deaths.



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