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July 17, 2009

Former Iranian president Hashemi Rafsanjani leads Friday prayers

Friday, July 17, 2009

Other stories from Iran
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Ali Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani
Image: Mesgary.

Hashemi Rafsanjani, the Iranian cleric, former president of Iran, and current head of the Expediency Council, has given his first Friday prayer service in Tehran since the disputed June 12 Iranian presidential election.

In the sermon, which was held at Tehran University and twice disrupted by loud chanting from demonstrators, Rafsanjani first discussed the earliest days of Islam and Mohammed’s lessons of the importance of human rights for all people and unity among all Muslims. He then made reference to Ja’far al-Sadiq, an 8th century C.E. Islamic leader who, while assisting a rebellion against the Umayyad caliphate, preferred to keep his own views on the conflict to himself.

In his first direct reference to current news events during the sermon, Rafsanjani called upon Chinese leaders to stop their violent suppression of unrest among the largely-Muslim Uyghur people of Xinjiang.

Turning to the disputed June 12 presidential election, Rafsanjani stated that “what happened after the election was not what we expected it to be.” The people’s participation was to be lauded, he said, and to not listen to the people’s voice is against the advice of Ayatollah Khomeini. Rafsanjani first called for the government to obey the rule of law:

We all need to follow the law. And I’m talking about the government, the parliament, the Islamic Courts and the security forces. We need to follow the laws. All problems can be solved if we only follow the framework of the laws. We need to create an environment where all sides could come together and discuss their issues. We need to be able to sit down like brothers and sisters and talk about our differences.

Rafsanjani listed several specific “proposals” for restoring unity and trust, all aimed at the government, and making particular reference to the Guardian Council’s certification of the election results, which many have termed fraudulent:

Unfortunately, The chance that was given to the Guardian Council of five days to get people together and regain their trust was not used. […] We shouldn’t imprison our own people, we should let these people return to their homes, we shouldn’t let our enemies laugh at us because we’ve imprisoned our own people. We should sit together with mourners, And we should console them, And bring them back closer to the system. We should not be impatient now. Please do not censor media outlets that have legally obtained permits. Let them do what they want to do legally.

Rafsanjani did not specifically mention any current Iranian political figure by name.

Rafsanjani’s speech was not broadcast by any Iranian state media outlet, in contrast to the usual practice of broadcasting the Friday prayers live.

IRIB headquarters
Image: Zereshk.

Loud chanting was occasionally audible in the speech, with large crowds reportedly present around Tehran University. Unconfirmed reports say that after the sermon ended, a large crowd began moving toward the w:Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting (IRIB)’s headquarters on Vali Asr Avenue. According to an update to Mir-Hossein Mousavi‘s Facebook page posted last night, the candidate is among the crowd today.


Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Former Iranian president Hashemi Rafsanjani leads Friday prayers

Friday, July 17, 2009

Other stories from Iran
Location of Iran

A map showing the location of Iran

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Iran, see the Iran Portal

Ali Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani
Image: Mesgary.

Hashemi Rafsanjani, the Iranian cleric, former president of Iran, and current head of the Expediency Council, has given his first Friday prayer service in Tehran since the disputed June 12 Iranian presidential election.

In the sermon, which was held at Tehran University and twice disrupted by loud chanting from demonstrators, Rafsanjani first discussed the earliest days of Islam and Mohammed’s lessons of the importance of human rights for all people and unity among all Muslims. He then made reference to Ja’far al-Sadiq, an 8th century C.E. Islamic leader who, while assisting a rebellion against the Umayyad caliphate, preferred to keep his own views on the conflict to himself.

In his first direct reference to current news events during the sermon, Rafsanjani called upon Chinese leaders to stop their [[w:July 2009 Ürümqi riots|violent suppression of unrest among the largely-Muslim Uyghur people of Xinjiang.

Turning to the disputed June 12 presidential election, Rafsanjani stated that “what happened after the election was not what we expected it to be.” The people’s participation was to be lauded, he said, and to not listen to the people’s voice is against the advice of Ayatollah Khomeini. Rafsanjani first called for the government to obey the rule of law:

We all need to follow the law. And I’m talking about the government, the parliament, the Islamic Courts and the security forces. We need to follow the laws. All problems can be solved if we only follow the framework of the laws. We need to create an environment where all sides could come together and discuss their issues. We need to be able to sit down like brothers and sisters and talk about our differences.

Rafsanjani listed several specific “proposals” for restoring unity and trust, all aimed at the government, and making particular reference to the Guardian Council’s certification of the election results, which many have termed fraudulent:

Unfortunately, The chance that was given to the Guardian Council of five days to get people together and regain their trust was not used. […] We shouldn’t imprison our own people, we should let these people return to their homes, we shouldn’t let our enemies laugh at us because we’ve imprisoned our own people. We should sit together with mourners, And we should console them, And bring them back closer to the system. We should not be impatient now. Please do not censor media outlets that have legally obtained permits. Let them do what they want to do legally.

Rafsanjani did not specifically mention any current Iranian political figure by name.

Rafsanjani’s speech was not broadcast by any Iranian state media outlet, in contrast to the usual practice of broadcasting the Friday prayers live.

IRIB headquarters
Image: Zereshk.

Loud chanting was occasionally audible in the speech, with large crowds reportedly present around Tehran University. Unconfirmed reports say that after the sermon ended, a large crowd began moving toward the w:Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting (IRIB)’s headquarters on Vali Asr Avenue. According to an update to Mir-Hossein Mousavi‘s Facebook page posted last night, the candidate is among the crowd today.


Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Former Iranian president Hashemi Rafsanjani leads Friday prayers

Friday, July 17, 2009

Other stories from Iran
Location of Iran

A map showing the location of Iran

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Iran, see the Iran Portal

Ali Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani
Image: Mesgary.

Hashemi Rafsanjani, the Iranian cleric, former president of Iran, and current head of the Expediency Council, has given his first Friday prayer service in Tehran since the disputed June 12 Iranian presidential election.

In the sermon, which was held at Tehran University and twice disrupted by loud chanting from demonstrators, Rafsanjani first discussed the earliest days of Islam and Mohammed’s lessons of the importance of human rights for all people and unity among all Muslims. He then made reference to Ja’far al-Sadiq, an 8th century C.E. Islamic leader who, while assisting a rebellion against the Umayyad caliphate, preferred to keep his own views on the conflict to himself.

In his first direct reference to current news events during the sermon, Rafsanjani called upon Chinese leaders to stop their [[w:July 2009 Ürümqi riots|violent suppression of unrest among the largely-Muslim Uyghur people of Xinjiang.

Turning to the disputed June 12 presidential election, Rafsanjani stated that “what happened after the election was not what we expected it to be.” The people’s participation was to be lauded, he said, and to not listen to the people’s voice is against the advice of Ayatollah Khomeini. Rafsanjani first called for the government to obey the rule of law:

We all need to follow the law. And I’m talking about the government, the parliament, the Islamic Courts and the security forces. We need to follow the laws. All problems can be solved if we only follow the framework of the laws. We need to create an environment where all sides could come together and discuss their issues. We need to be able to sit down like brothers and sisters and talk about our differences.

Rafsanjani listed several specific “proposals” for restoring unity and trust, all aimed at the government, and making particular reference to the Guardian Council’s certification of the election results, which many have termed fraudulent:

Unfortunately, The chance that was given to the Guardian Council of five days to get people together and regain their trust was not used. […] We shouldn’t imprison our own people, we should let these people return to their homes, we shouldn’t let our enemies laugh at us because we’ve imprisoned our own people. We should sit together with mourners, And we should console them, And bring them back closer to the system. We should not be impatient now. Please do not censor media outlets that have legally obtained permits. Let them do what they want to do legally.

Rafsanjani did not specifically mention any current Iranian political figure by name.

Rafsanjani’s speech was not broadcast by any Iranian state media outlet, in contrast to the usual practice of broadcasting the Friday prayers live. [[File:IRIB east gate 2.JPG|thumb|left|IRIB headquarters
Image: Zereshk. Loud chanting was occasionally audible in the speech, with large crowds reportedly present around Tehran University. Unconfirmed reports say that after the sermon ended, a large crowd began moving toward the w:Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting (IRIB)’s headquarters on Vali Asr Avenue. According to an update to Mir-Hossein Mousavi‘s Facebook page posted last night, the candidate is among the crowd today.


Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Former Iranian president Hashemi Rafsanjani leads Friday prayers

Former Iranian president Hashemi Rafsanjani leads Friday prayers

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Friday, July 17, 2009

Iran
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Ali Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani
Image: Mesgary.

Hashemi Rafsanjani, the Iranian cleric, former president of Iran, and current head of the Expediency Council, has given his first Friday prayer service in Tehran since the disputed June 12 Iranian presidential election.

In the sermon, which was held at Tehran University and twice disrupted by loud chanting from demonstrators, Rafsanjani first discussed the earliest days of Islam and Mohammed’s lessons of the importance of human rights for all people and unity among all Muslims. He then made reference to Ja’far al-Sadiq, an 8th century C.E. Islamic leader who, while assisting a rebellion against the Umayyad caliphate, preferred to keep his own views on the conflict to himself.

In his first direct reference to current news events during the sermon, Rafsanjani called upon Chinese leaders to stop their violent suppression of unrest among the largely-Muslim Uyghur people of Xinjiang.

Turning to the disputed June 12 presidential election, Rafsanjani stated that “what happened after the election was not what we expected it to be.” The people’s participation was to be lauded, he said, and to not listen to the people’s voice is against the advice of Ayatollah Khomeini. Rafsanjani first called for the government to obey the rule of law:

Cquote1.svg We all need to follow the law. And I’m talking about the government, the parliament, the Islamic Courts and the security forces. We need to follow the laws. All problems can be solved if we only follow the framework of the laws. We need to create an environment where all sides could come together and discuss their issues. We need to be able to sit down like brothers and sisters and talk about our differences. Cquote2.svg

Rafsanjani listed several specific “proposals” for restoring unity and trust, all aimed at the government, and making particular reference to the Guardian Council’s certification of the election results, which many have termed fraudulent:

Cquote1.svg Unfortunately, The chance that was given to the Guardian Council of five days to get people together and regain their trust was not used. […] We shouldn’t imprison our own people, we should let these people return to their homes, we shouldn’t let our enemies laugh at us because we’ve imprisoned our own people. We should sit together with mourners, And we should console them, And bring them back closer to the system. We should not be impatient now. Please do not censor media outlets that have legally obtained permits. Let them do what they want to do legally. Cquote2.svg

Rafsanjani did not specifically mention any current Iranian political figure by name.

Rafsanjani’s speech was not broadcast by any Iranian state media outlet, in contrast to the usual practice of broadcasting the Friday prayers live.

IRIB headquarters
Image: Zereshk.

Loud chanting was occasionally audible in the speech, with large crowds reportedly present around Tehran University. Unconfirmed reports say that after the sermon ended, a large crowd began moving toward the Islamic Republic of Iran Broadcasting (IRIB)’s headquarters on Vali Asr Avenue. According to an update to Mir-Hossein Mousavi’s Facebook page posted last night and a report by Reuters news service, the candidate attended the ceremony.



Related news

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

April 11, 2006

Former Iranian president Rafsanjani states Iran is enriching uranium

Former Iranian president Rafsanjani states Iran is enriching uranium

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
Iran’s nuclear program
Iran's nuclear program
Recent stories
  • 25 November 2013: Iran to reduce nuclear enrichment in exchange for sanctions reduction
  • 12 November 2013: Iran agrees to expanded monitoring of nuclear sites
  • 9 April 2013: Wikinews interviews Amir Abbas Fakhravar about Iranian nuclear intentions
  • 31 December 2012: Iranian Navy conducts drills in Strait of Hormuz
External and Inter-wiki links
  • Wikipedia article about Iran’s nuclear program
  • Wikipedia article about Iran and WMDs

Tuesday, April 11, 2006

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad confirmed on Tuesday that the country has successfully enriched uranium from 164 of their centrifuges.

“I am officially announcing that Iran has joined the group of those countries which have nuclear technology. This is the result of the Iranian nation’s resistance. Based on international regulations, we will continue our path until we achieve production of industrial-scale enrichment,” Ahmadinejad said.

“Iran has put into operation the first unit of 164 centrifuges, has injected (the uranium) gas and has reached industrial production. We operated the first unit which comprises of 164 centrifuges, gas was injected, and we got the industrial output. We should expand the work of these machines to achieve a full industrial line. We need dozens of these units (sets totaling 164 centrifuges) to achieve a uranium enrichment facility,” said Iran’s former President, Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani, earlier today.

Ahmadinejad had said on Monday that he would release “good nuclear news which will be a source of pride for the whole Iranian nation” today and that reports from the media are part of the United States campaign involving “psychological warfare.”

“Nothing can stop our civil nuclear program as the Iranians are a courageous nation and not afraid of intimidations. We are not after atomic bombs,” added Ahmadinejad.

According to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), Iran began to test 20 centrifuges in March. Iran’s current enrichment is only to reactor-grade — around 3.5% of the isotope uranium-235. Uranium-235 has a natural abundance of 0.72% and is one isotope of uranium which is easily fissionable. In order to create a nuclear bomb, a few hundred metric tons of natural uranium must be used enriched above 90% of uranium-235. Experts have said that if Iran is going to attempt to make enough uranium-235 for a nuclear bomb, they would need to install a few thousand centrifuges in series or process the gas through the same set of centrifuges over 50 times.

On Wednesday, Mohamed ElBaradei, the President of the IAEA, will visit Iran to review the progression, if any, to Iran’s nuclear program and will release a report at the end of April.

The United States said that Iran is “moving in the wrong direction” in regards to its nuclear program and that if it continues its program, it will discuss the possibility of taking steps with the United Nations.

Washington DC is said to “be talking about the way forward with the other members of the Security Council and Germany about how to address this [Iran’s nuclear program],” according to White House spokesman Scott McClellan.



Related news

  • “IAEA chief, Russia, China express concerns about threats against Iran” — Wikinews, April 2, 2006
  • “UN Security Council calls on Iran to suspend uranium enrichment” — Wikinews, March 29, 2006

Sources

  • “The Nuclear Fuel Cycle: Analysis and Management”. Robert G. Cochran and Nicholas Tsoulfanidis, American Nuclear Society, 1990. ISBN 0-89448-451-6
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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

August 12, 2005

Iran stands firmly against nuclear agency resolution

Iran stands firmly against nuclear agency resolution

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, August 12, 2005

In a nationally broadcast radio sermon by former Iranian president Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani on Friday, he said of the U. N. watchdog group adopting the resolution for Iran to stop nuclear enrichment activities, “The decision was a cruel one.”

The Thurday adoption in Vienna by the governing board of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) was unanimous and legally non-binding in asking Iran to suspend all nuclear fuel related activities. The board also requested a report from the agency’s chief, Mohamed ElBaradei, on its compliance by Tehran.

On Thursday, an Iranian member of their nuclear negotiating team, Sirous Nasseri, read in London a statement made by his republic at the emergency governing board meeting of the IAEA regarding the Nuclear proliferation treaty (NPT):

How can this body be called to react to an act, which is in full conformity with the NPT and the safeguards and constitutes a limited manifestation of the exercise of an inalienable right? A right, which by its own simple meaning, cannot be alienated from anyone.

IAEA spokeswoman Melissa Fleming, said yesterday, “The resolution on Iran was just adopted without a vote, by consensus. So, full consensus. All 35 members of the board agreed to the language of the resolution text.”

International concern over the Iranian nuclear enrichment program was led by the European Union countries of France, Great Britain, and Germany (EU-3), along with the United States. The pressure brought by these nations succeeded in obtaining language calling for the re-instatement of seals that were removed at the Uranium Conversion Facility in Isfahan. The seals were removed during the recent installation of surveillance cameras by IAEA.

The agency is to monitor Tehran for compliance to halt uranium enrichment. After a September 3 deadline, Iran again faces a possible referral to the U.N. Security Council where it could be subject to economic sanctions.

Meanwhile, the United States is likely to grant an entry visa to Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad to attend the United Nations opening session next month in New York City, New York.

The Bush administration probe into whether Ahmadinejad was connected to the 1979-1981 Iranian hostage crisis is looking like it was a case of mistaken identity. The decision remains tentative as intelligence reports within the administration continue to circulate, according to The Washington Post citing U.S. officials.

Related news

  • “U.N. to begin forming response to Iranian nuclear program” — Wikinews, August 9, 2005

Sources

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

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