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August 27, 2015

South Sudanese President Salva Kiir signs peace deal

South Sudanese President Salva Kiir signs peace deal

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Thursday, August 27, 2015

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Salva Kiir in the United States last year.
Image: U.S. Department of State.

Salva Kiir, the President of South Sudan, yesterday signed a deal designed to end a civil ethnic conflict that has killed thousands and displaced over two million.

Under the deal Kiir will share power with Riek Machar. Machar was Vice President but Kiir sacked him in 2013. December that year saw the dispute turn to war. Kiir is a Dinka while Machar is a Nuer, and the conflict has largely split along these racial lines.

Kiir spoke of “serious reservations” at the signing ceremony in Juba. He is concerned about a requirement to consult “First Vice President” Machar, as he will be under the deal, on policies. He is also concerned about demilitarisation of Juba.

The deal to close the 20-month conflict was negotiated in Ethiopia, where Machar signed the same deal last week. Several ceasefires have failed over months of talks. Kiir, the only leader in South Sudan since independence in 2011, sought an extension of a two-week deadline but signed yesterday after United Nations sanctions were threatened.

Both sides accused the other of continuing hostilities. The rebels claimed government forces attacked them south of Juba, but say they were victorious. Kiir claimed the rebels attacked a northern position. Kiir says international leaders were “careless” with negotiations and warned a flawed deal could do more harm.

Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni, Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn, Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta, and UN secretary-general Ban Ki-moon all expressed their approval of the deal’s signing. Kenyatta called it a “happy day for us in the region”. Earlier in the day he warned there was “no such thing as a perfect agreement” and Museveni said the conflict was “the wrong war in the wrong place at the wrong time”.



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December 18, 2014

Nation mourns, world condemns Taliban attack on Pakistan army school

Nation mourns, world condemns Taliban attack on Pakistan army school

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Thursday, December 18, 2014

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In the wake of Tuesday’s high-school attack by the Pakistani Taliban (TTK) on an army public school, Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif announced a three-day period of official mourning. In addition to condemnation from world leaders — who include UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon, the President of the European Parliament Martin Schulz, and Deputy director David Griffiths of Amnesty International — news agency Reuters are reporting the Afghan Taliban have also issued a statement condemning the attack.

The statement carried by Reuters, claiming to be from Taliban spokesman Zabihullah Mujahid, reads: “The intentional killing of innocent people, children and women are against the basics of Islam and this criteria has to be considered by every Islamic party and government.” Tuesday’s attack on the Army Public School in Pakistan‘s north-western city of Peshawar claimed the lives of 132 children, and nine staff from the school.

Official reports, following police and military action against the attackers, insist seven people took part in the school attack; although a statement, issued by the TTK, insists there were only six, their targets being older pupils. The attack began in the mid morning local time, with the assailants observed entering the compound wearing suicide vests. Shortly thereafter, shots were heard with survivors reporting the gunmen were shooting people indiscriminately, going from classroom to classroom, killing teachers and students as they found them.

The massacre sparked a public outcry, both national and international; which, press speculate, led to the TTK stressing the intent to only target older students at the army school.

Turkey announced one day of national mourning. Described as impossible to justify and “blood-curdling” by the UN Secretary-General, EU Parliamentary President Schulz labelled the attack “abominable and cowardly [demonstrating] the inhuman attitude of the Taliban, their inhuman ideology, their remorseless fanaticism”, and Indian Nobel Prize-winner Kailash Satyarthi, condemned the attackers as “enemies of Allah” and stated: “The militants, be they Taliban or any other militants, who kill children, are the enemies of humanity. This attack is a blot on humanity”.

In addition to a three-day period of national mourning, President Sharif reintroduced Pakistan’s death penalty.



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December 22, 2013

Rebels take over South Sudan oil regions

Rebels take over South Sudan oil regions

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Sunday, December 22, 2013

South Sudan
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  • 22 December 2013: Rebels take over South Sudan oil regions
  • 26 January 2012: ‘Davos man’ versus ‘Camp Igloo’; 42nd World Economic Forum convenes in Swiss alps
  • 10 July 2011: South Sudan gains independence
  • 10 February 2011: South Sudan minister Milla shot, killed
  • 26 April 2010: Spokesman: At least 55 dead after violence in Darfur, Sudan
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Rebel troops under the command of Riek Machar, former vice president of South Sudan, today stated they now control a number of areas of the country including the oil-rich Unity State which borders Sudan. Government troops are attempting to take back Bor, the capital of the state of Jonglei.

Location of Unity State within South Sudan.
Image: Ivan25.

In Juba, reportedly at least 500 people were killed in the last week. The US military said three US military aircraft — CV-22 Ospreys — were attacked by the rebel troops around Bor, and four US soldiers were injured and taken to Nairobi, Kenya for treatment. At a United Nations facility in Akobo, an attack killed two Indian peacekeepers and at least eleven civilians on Thursday.

Since South Sudan’s 2011 independence from Sudan, ethnic conflicts have caused hundreds of deaths.

World leaders have reacted to the violence. UN General Secretary Ban Ki-Moon said: “I demand that all political, military and militia leaders stop hostilities and end the violence against the civilians. I call on them to do everything in their power to ensure that their followers hear their message loud and clear.”

US President Barack Obama said “any effort to seize power through the use of military force will result in the end of longstanding support from the United States and the international community”.



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November 22, 2012

Militia group captures Goma, Congo

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  • 18 March 2012: FA Cup game abandoned after Fabrice Muamba collapses on pitch
  • 27 June 2011: Funeral held for former Zambian President Frederick Chiluba
  • 5 May 2011: DR Congo transport minister sacked after numerous boat accidents
  • 18 October 2010: ‘Enough, enough, enough, enough’: 1700 women march against mass rape in DR Congo
  • 30 July 2010: Up to 140 feared dead as boat sinks in DR Congo
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Thursday, November 22, 2012

The March 23 Movement (M23) militia captured the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) city of Goma Tuesday, largely without resistance from the Congolese military or United Nations intervention; they have continued to advance on regional villages, where the response of additional local factions has led to violence and civilian displacement.

North Kivu province, Democratic Republic of Congo

On Monday, M23 fired mortars and fully automatic weapons at targets near the city of Goma, in the DRC North Kivu province. The M23 militia unsuccessfully urged President Joseph Kabila‘s government to begin negotiations for the group’s withdrawal from the Goma area. M23 demanded that the DRC government demilitarize Goma and open the international border at Bunagana. The Congolese government refused negotiation offers.

Without negotiations, the M23 continued their advance on Goma. On Tuesday, the M23 approached the city. The DRC military withdrew from the area while UN forces stood aside. A statement from the UN peacekeepers explained that their role is not to engage in a civil war, but rather to protect civilians.

Once Goma was under M23 control, the militia turned its efforts to surrounding areas. The M23 captured the small town of Sake, about 25 km (15 mi) west-northwest of Goma. Congolese military units and other local combatants eventually responded by attacking the M23 near Sake. Local civilians fled the violence.

Harsh conditions in Mugunga (September, 2012).
Image: Steven van Damme/Oxfam.

The United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO) set up a camp for the internally displaced people in the village of Mugunga, about 10km from Goma. People struggled along roadways towards Mugunga with what few of their possesions they could carry in plastic bags, thrown across a shoulder, or carried on top of their heads. Families huddled together at Mugunga among piles of their belongings. Oxfam International recently estimated more than 50,000 people are refugees of the conflict..

The DRC government has previously expressed belief that the M23 group is operating as an extension of the Rwandan Army. The UN Security Council alleged that Rwanda, as well as Uganda, supplied mortars and other military equipment, as well as logistics, to the rebels. Rwanda has denied involvement. The DRC has called for international sanctions on Rwanda to discourage support for the M23 forces.

The presidents of DRC, Rwanda, and Uganda, meeting in Kampala, Uganda, called on the militia to end their occupation of areas they have taken. M23 spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel Vianney Kazarama has said the group indend to seize the eastern town of Bukavu.

A miner in the Democratic Republic of Congo holds Wolframite minerals.
Image: Julien Harneis.

M23 soldiers near Bunagana in July.
Image: Al Jazeera.

The M23 consists of many Tutsis from a previous military group called the National Congress for the Defense of the People (CNDP). The M23 group defected in April, following the failure of a peace accord from March 23, 2009 between the CNDP and the Congolese government.

DRC is a resource rich area. It is one of the world’s primary producers of several minerals used in electronics manufacturing, including Wolframite and Coltan. The wealth in minerals and diamonds has enticed many groups to attempt to gain control of the region, and has been the cause of prior conflicts.



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Militia group threatens Goma, Congo

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Thursday, November 22, 2012

Location of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

The March 23 Movement (M23) militia captured the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) city of Goma, largely without Congolese military resistance or United Nations intervention.

On November 19, 2012, M23 fired mortars and automatic weapons at targets near the edges of Goma. The M23 militia unsuccessfully urged President Joseph Kabila’s government to begin negotiations for the group’s withdrawal from Goma area. M23 demanded Goma’s demilitarization and the re-opening of the international border at Bunagana. The Congolese government refused negotiation offers

Without negotiations, the M23 continued their advance on Goma. As the M23 approached the city, DRC military withdrew while UN peacekeepers stood aside. The UN peacekeepers have said their role is not to engage in a civil war.

The M23 militia have continued to advance on regional villages, where the response of additional local factions has been more violent. This fighting has displaced at least 55,000 civilians from the North Kivu province, according to Oxfam International.

Cquote1.svg “The [UN] Secretary-General strongly condemns the grave violations of international humanitarian and human rights law by the M23 and calls on all parties to allow safe, timely and unhindered humanitarian access to those in need.” Cquote2.svg

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon

The DRC government has expressed belief that the M23 group is operating as an extension of the Rwandan Army. The UN Security Council alleged that Rwanda, as well as Uganda, supplied mortars and other military equipment, as well as logistics, to the rebels. Rwanda has denied involvement. The DRC has called for international sanctions on Rwanda to discourage support for the M23 forces.

The M23 mainly consists of Tutsis, formerly part in the Congolese army, who defected in May. M23 comes from a failed peace accord, between the National Congress for the Defence of the People (CNDP) and the Congolese government, that was signed March 23, 2009.

DRC is a resource rich area. It is one of the world’s primary producers of several minerals used in electronics manufacturing, specifically Coltan. The wealth in minerals and diamonds has attracted many groups to attempt to gain control of the region, and has been the cause of prior conflicts.



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Democratic Republic of Congo

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Militia group captures Goma, Congo; advances on villages

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Other stories from the DRC
  • 18 March 2012: FA Cup game abandoned after Fabrice Muamba collapses on pitch
  • 27 June 2011: Funeral held for former Zambian President Frederick Chiluba
  • 5 May 2011: DR Congo transport minister sacked after numerous boat accidents
  • 18 October 2010: ‘Enough, enough, enough, enough’: 1700 women march against mass rape in DR Congo
  • 30 July 2010: Up to 140 feared dead as boat sinks in DR Congo
…More articles here
Location of Democratic Republic of the Congo

A map showing the location of the DRC

To write, edit, start or view other articles on DRC, visit the DRC Portal
Flag of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.svg

Thursday, November 22, 2012

The March 23 Movement (M23) militia captured the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) city of Goma Tuesday, largely without resistance from the Congolese military or United Nations intervention; they have continued to advance on regional villages, where the response of additional local factions has led to violence and civilian displacement.

North Kivu province, Democratic Republic of Congo

On Monday, M23 fired mortars and fully automatic weapons at targets near the city of Goma, in the DRC North Kivu province. The M23 militia unsuccessfully urged President Joseph Kabila‘s government to begin negotiations for the group’s withdrawal from the Goma area. M23 demanded that the DRC government demilitarize Goma and open the international border at Bunagana. The Congolese government refused negotiation offers.

Without negotiations, the M23 continued their advance on Goma. On Tuesday, the M23 approached the city. The DRC military withdrew from the area while UN forces stood aside. A statement from the UN peacekeepers explained that their role is not to engage in a civil war, but rather to protect civilians.

Once Goma was under M23 control, the militia turned its efforts to surrounding areas. The M23 captured the small town of Sake, about 25 km (15 mi) west-northwest of Goma. Congolese military units and other local combatants eventually responded by attacking the M23 near Sake. Local civilians fled the violence.

Harsh conditions in Mugunga (September, 2012).
Image: Steven van Damme/Oxfam.

The United Nations Organization Stabilization Mission in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (MONUSCO) set up a camp for the internally displaced people in the village of Mugunga, about 10km from Goma. People struggled along roadways towards Mugunga with what few of their possesions they could carry in plastic bags, thrown across a shoulder, or carried on top of their heads. Families huddled together at Mugunga among piles of their belongings. Oxfam International recently estimated more than 50,000 people are refugees of the conflict..

The DRC government has previously expressed belief that the M23 group is operating as an extension of the Rwandan Army. The UN Security Council alleged that Rwanda, as well as Uganda, supplied mortars and other military equipment, as well as logistics, to the rebels. Rwanda has denied involvement. The DRC has called for international sanctions on Rwanda to discourage support for the M23 forces.

The presidents of DRC, Rwanda, and Uganda, meeting in Kampala, Uganda, called on the militia to end their occupation of areas they have taken. M23 spokesperson Lieutenant Colonel Vianney Kazarama has said the group indend to seize the eastern town of Bukavu.

A miner in the Democratic Republic of Congo holds Wolframite minerals.
Image: Julien Harneis.

M23 soldiers near Bunagana in July.
Image: Al Jazeera.

The M23 consists of many Tutsis from a previous military group called the National Congress for the Defense of the People (CNDP). The M23 group defected in April, following the failure of a peace accord from March 23, 2009 between the CNDP and the Congolese government.

DRC is a resource rich area. It is one of the world’s primary producers of several minerals used in electronics manufacturing, including Wolframite and Coltan. The wealth in minerals and diamonds has enticed many groups to attempt to gain control of the region, and has been the cause of prior conflicts.



Sister links

  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg Democratic Republic of Congo

Sources

External links

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

November 20, 2012

Israel sets 36 hour ultimatum for Hamas

Israel sets 36 hour ultimatum for Hamas – Wikinews, the free news source

Israel sets 36 hour ultimatum for Hamas

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Tuesday, November 20, 2012

Israel
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IDF forces stage around Gaza
Image: Israel Defence Force.

Israel warned Hamas yesterday to cease rocket fire and threatened a widening offensive if Hamas continues. Hamas maintains Israel “is the aggressor.”

The ultimatum comes after Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu stated the Israel Defence Force (IDF) was “prepared for a significant expansion of the operation” and after 75,000 army reservists were drafted for duty.

“We are at a junction. Either we go toward a calm or toward a meaningful widening of the operation… including a possible move to achieve complete military decision”, said Israeli Finance Minister Yuval Steinitz to IDF Radio.

United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon is in the region meeting with the Arab Leauge in an attempt to negotiate a ceasefire between Israel and Gaza. There has been some optimism as Netanyahu met with his cabinet members to discuss a phased ceasefire agreement.

Israel has led an air campaign targeting high ranking Hamas commanders, rocket launcher locations, and Hamas communication sites, but has come under scrutiny with the rising number of civilian deaths in Gaza.



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November 19, 2012

Goma, Congo attacked by rebels

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Monday, November 19, 2012

Location of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

The Democratic Republic of the Congo‘s (DRC) March 23 Movement (M23) militia group are threatening to attack the eastern city of Goma.

M23 have fired mortars and automatic weapons at targets near the edges of the city.

Cquote1.svg “The [UN] Secretary-General strongly condemns the grave violations of international humanitarian and human rights law by the M23 and calls on all parties to allow safe, timely and unhindered humanitarian access to those in need.” Cquote2.svg

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon

The M23 militia have unsuccessfully urged President Joseph Kabila’s government to begin negotiations for the group’s withdrawal from Goma. M23 demanded Goma’s demilitarization and the re-opening of the international border at Bunagana. The Congolese government has refused negotiation offers, and has expressed belief that the M23 group is operating as an extension of the Rwandan Army. The UN Security Council has alleged that Rwanda, as well as Uganda, supplied mortars and other military equipment to the rebels. Rwanda has denied involvement.

The DRC has called for international sanctions on Rwanda to discourage support for the M23 forces.

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon has condemned the violence in a recent statement: “The Secretary-General is deeply concerned by the devastating humanitarian consequences of the fighting that has led to the displacement of at least 60,000 people, many of whom are fleeing toward Goma. The Secretary-General strongly condemns the grave violations of international humanitarian and human rights law by the M23 and calls on all parties to allow safe, timely and unhindered humanitarian access to those in need.”

The M23 mainly consists of Tutsis, formerly part in the Congolese army, who defected in May. M23 comes from a failed peace accord, between the National Congress for the Defence of the People (CNDP) and the Congolese government, that was signed March 23, 2009.

DRC is a resource rich area. It is one of the world’s primary producers of several minerals used in electronics manufacturing, specifically Coltan. The wealth in minerals and diamonds has attracted many groups to attempt to gain control of the region, and has been the cause of prior conflicts.



Sources

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject:
Democratic Republic of Congo

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 20, 2012

UK politician foresees nuclear Iran triggering new Middle Eastern cold war

UK politician foresees nuclear Iran triggering new Middle Eastern cold war

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Monday, February 20, 2012

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British Foreign Secretary William Hague has described a possibility of a new cold war in the Middle East due to the Iranian nuclear programme. United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon suggests negotiating with Iran by asking it to disprove the allegations of developing nuclear weapons.

The comments were made by UK Foreign Secretary William Hague, pictured here in 2010.

“If [the Iranians] obtain nuclear weapons capability, then I think other nations across the Middle East will want to develop nuclear weapons,” Hague said. “The most serious round of nuclear proliferation since nuclear weapons were invented would have begun.” Ex-UK diplomat Sir Richard Dalton rules out the possibility of Iran developing nuclear weapons.

Meanwhile Ki-moon dismissed US and Israeli suggestions of attacking Iran, saying that “all these issues should be resolved peacefully through negotiations, through dialogue.” He said so after attending anniversary ceremonies of an agency to detect secret nuclear weapon tests, called the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Organisation. Hague has also urged Israel not to strike. He said, “All options must remain on the table but a military attack would have enormous downsides.” He insisted on giving sanctions to Iran instead.

However, some US officials extrapolated that Iran is determined about the nuclear programme as the nation threatened to disrupt oil supply to six European nations earlier this week. A number of US officials now believe that attacking Iran is the only way out.

Dalton stated, “There are many signs, as reported by the International Atomic Energy Agency, that some research and development relevant to the development of nuclear weapons may still be going on. But it is wrong to say that Iran is rushing towards having a nuclear weapon.”

Iran organised a ceremony which revealed its nuclear programme on Wednesday. It stated that the programme is only about generating nuclear power. Iran also loaded its first domestically created fuel into the reactor last week.



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May 3, 2011

World leaders react to death of Osama bin Laden

World leaders react to death of Osama bin Laden

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Tuesday, May 3, 2011

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Cquote1.svg Osama bin Laden suggested that he was operating in the name of Islam, but in reality he makes a mockery of the fundamental values of his own and every other religion. Cquote2.svg

—Angela Merkel

Leaders and officals around the world have issued varied reactions to the announcement that Osama bin Laden has been killed during a U.S. military operation in Pakistan. NATO has insisted it will continue fighting against militants in Afghanistan, and the United Nations said the death of bin Laden marked a “watershed moment in our common global fight against terrorism.”

Announcing that the al-Qaeda leader had been killed by U.S. special forces during a forty-minute raid on a compound in Abbottabad, near the capital Islamabad, U.S. President Barack Obama said it was “a good day for America.” Speaking at a ceremony to celebrate winners of the Medal of Honor, Obama praised the “anonymous heroes” who took part in the operation. He said: “We may not always know their names, we may not always know their stories, but they are always there on the front lines of freedom and we are truly blessed. As commander-in-chief, I could not be prouder of our men and women in uniform.”

Anders Fogh Rasmussen, the chief of NATO, vowed the organization would remain fighting in Afghanistan despite the death of bin Laden. “As terrorism continues to pose a direct threat to our security and international stability, international cooperation remains key and NATO is at the heart of that cooperation,” he said in a statement. “NATO allies and partners will continue their mission to ensure that Afghanistan never again becomes a safe haven for extremism, but develops in peace and security.”

The U.N. and the European Parliament also welcomed the news. Ban Ki-moon, the U.N. secretary general, said: “The death of Osama bin Laden, announced by President Obama last night, is a watershed moment in our common global fight against terrorism. The crimes of al-Qaeda touched most continents, bringing tragedy and loss of life to thousands of men, women and children.”

Barack Obama announces the news that bin Laden had been killed. He said it was “a good day for America.”
Image: White House.

David Cameron, the British Prime Minister, said the news “will be welcomed right across our country” and was a “massive step forward,” but warned the death of bin Laden “does not mark the end of the threat we face from extremist terror.” Italian Prime Minster Silvio Berlusconi said: “This is a great outcome in the fight against evil, in the fight against terrorism, a great outcome for the United States and for all democracies”.

Angela Merkel, the German chancellor, said the killing of bin Laden was a “decisive strike” at al-Qaeda. “At his command and in his name, terror was enforced into many countries against men women and children, Christians as well as Muslims,” she said. “Osama bin Laden suggested that he was operating in the name of Islam, but in reality he makes a mockery of the fundamental values of his own and every other religion.”

Several Asian countries also said bin Laden’s death was a step forward in the war against terrorism. Chinese spokeswoman Jiang Yu said “China has taken note of the announcement. We believe the death of Osama bin Laden is a milestone and a positive development for the international anti-terrorism efforts.” Japan, Malaysia and Singapore also welcomed the news.

Australia pledged not to withdraw forces from Afghanistan after the announcement. “Osama bin Laden declared war on innocent people and today he has paid the price for that declaration,” Julia Gillard, the Prime Minister, said. “The mission in Afghanistan will continue,” she added, saying al-Qaeda “will continue”. Nicolas Sarkozy, the President of France, said bin Laden was a “promoter of the ideology of hatred and was the chief of a terrorist organization responsible for the deaths of thousands of victims, especially in Muslim countries,” and “justice has been done” for the victims of al-Qaeda attacks.



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