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July 8, 2009

Google announces new operating system

Google announces new operating system – Wikinews, the free news source

Google announces new operating system

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Wednesday, July 8, 2009

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Google announced today that they are developing Google Chrome OS. The operating system, announced on their official blog, will be based on their Chrome browser, which is now nine months old.

Google said that at first it will be targeted toward netbooks, but in the future, will eventually expand. The company said that it will continue to be developed alongside Android, their operating system currently being used on mobile devices.

The system will run in a windowing system atop a Linux kernel and will be fully open source. It is planned to be released in 2010. On their blog, Google said, “Speed, simplicity and security are the key aspects of Google Chrome OS. We’re designing the OS to be fast and lightweight, to start up and get you onto the web in a few seconds,” said the blog post written by Sundar Pichai, Vice President Product Management, and Google’s engineering director, Linus Upson.

Both men said that “the operating systems that browsers run on were designed in an era where there was no web” and that the new OS is “our attempt to re-think what operating systems should be”.



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February 4, 2009

Stanford physicists print smallest-ever letters \’SU\’ at subatomic level of 1.5 nanometres tall

Stanford physicists print smallest-ever letters ‘SU’ at subatomic level of 1.5 nanometres tall

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Wednesday, February 4, 2009

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Stanford University view from Hoover Tower observation deck of the Quad and surrounding area, facing west
Image: User:Jawed.

A new historic physics record has been set by scientists for exceedingly small writing, opening a new door to computing’s future. Stanford University physicists have claimed to have written the letters “SU” at sub-atomic size.

Graduate students Christopher Moon, Laila Mattos, Brian Foster and Gabriel Zeltzer, under the direction of assistant professor of physics Hari Manoharan, have produced the world’s smallest lettering, which is approximately 1.5 nanometres tall, using a molecular projector, called Scanning Tunneling Microscope (STM) to push individual carbon monoxide molecules on a copper or silver sheet surface, based on interference of electron energy states.

A nanometre (Greek: νάνος, nanos, dwarf; μετρώ, metrό, count) is a unit of length in the metric system, equal to one billionth of a metre (i.e., 10-9 m or one millionth of a millimetre), and also equals ten Ångström, an internationally recognized non-SI unit of length. It is often associated with the field of nanotechnology.

“We miniaturised their size so drastically that we ended up with the smallest writing in history,” said Manoharan. “S” and “U,” the two letters in honor of their employer have been reduced so tiny in nanoimprint that if used to print out 32 volumes of an Encyclopedia, 2,000 times, the contents would easily fit on a pinhead.

In the world of downsizing, nanoscribes Manoharan and Moon have proven that information, if reduced in size smaller than an atom, can be stored in more compact form than previously thought. In computing jargon, small sizing results to greater speed and better computer data storage.

“Writing really small has a long history. We wondered: What are the limits? How far can you go? Because materials are made of atoms, it was always believed that if you continue scaling down, you’d end up at that fundamental limit. You’d hit a wall,” said Manoharan.

Scanning tunneling microscope sample under test at the University of St Andrews. Sample is MoS2 (Molybdenum Sulphide) being probed by a Platinum-Iridium tip.

In writing the letters, the Stanford team utilized an electron’s unique feature of “pinball table for electrons” — its ability to bounce between different quantum states. In the vibration-proof basement lab of Stanford’s Varian Physics Building, the physicists used a Scanning tunneling microscope in encoding the “S” and “U” within the patterns formed by the electron’s activity, called wave function, arranging carbon monoxide molecules in a very specific pattern on a copper or silver sheet surface.

“Imagine [the copper as] a very shallow pool of water into which we put some rocks [the carbon monoxide molecules]. The water waves scatter and interfere off the rocks, making well defined standing wave patterns,” Manoharan noted. If the “rocks” are placed just right, then the shapes of the waves will form any letters in the alphabet, the researchers said. They used the quantum properties of electrons, rather than photons, as their source of illumination.

According to the study, the atoms were ordered in a circular fashion, with a hole in the middle. A flow of electrons was thereafter fired at the copper support, which resulted into a ripple effect in between the existing atoms. These were pushed aside, and a holographic projection of the letters “SU” became visible in the space between them. “What we did is show that the atom is not the limit — that you can go below that,” Manoharan said.

“It’s difficult to properly express the size of their stacked S and U, but the equivalent would be 0.3 nanometres. This is sufficiently small that you could copy out the Encyclopaedia Britannica on the head of a pin not just once, but thousands of times over,” Manoharan and his nanohologram collaborator Christopher Moon explained.

The team has also shown the salient features of the holographic principle, a property of quantum gravity theories which resolves the black hole information paradox within string theory. They stacked “S” and the “U” – two layers, or pages, of information — within the hologram.

The team stressed their discovery was concentrating electrons in space, in essence, a wire, hoping such a structure could be used to wire together a super-fast quantum computer in the future. In essence, “these electron patterns can act as holograms, that pack information into subatomic spaces, which could one day lead to unlimited information storage,” the study states.

The “Conclusion” of the Stanford article goes as follows:

According to theory, a quantum state can encode any amount of information (at zero temperature), requiring only sufficiently high bandwidth and time in which to read it out. In practice, only recently has progress been made towards encoding several bits into the shapes of bosonic single-photon wave functions, which has applications in quantum key distribution. We have experimentally demonstrated that 35 bits can be permanently encoded into a time-independent fermionic state, and that two such states can be simultaneously prepared in the same area of space. We have simulated hundreds of stacked pairs of random 7 times 5-pixel arrays as well as various ideas for pathological bit patterns, and in every case the information was theoretically encodable. In all experimental attempts, extending down to the subatomic regime, the encoding was successful and the data were retrieved at 100% fidelity. We believe the limitations on bit size are approxlambda/4, but surprisingly the information density can be significantly boosted by using higher-energy electrons and stacking multiple pages holographically. Determining the full theoretical and practical limits of this technique—the trade-offs between information content (the number of pages and bits per page), contrast (the number of measurements required per bit to overcome noise), and the number of atoms in the hologram—will involve further work.
Quantum holographic encoding in a two-dimensional electron gas, Christopher R. Moon, Laila S. Mattos, Brian K. Foster, Gabriel Zeltzer & Hari C. Manoharan

The team is not the first to design or print small letters, as attempts have been made since as early as 1960. In December 1959, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Richard Feynman, who delivered his now-legendary lecture entitled “There’s Plenty of Room at the Bottom,” promised new opportunities for those who “thought small.”

Feynman was an American physicist known for the path integral formulation of quantum mechanics, the theory of quantum electrodynamics and the physics of the superfluidity of supercooled liquid helium, as well as work in particle physics (he proposed the parton model).

Nanotechnology – Energy transfer diagrammed from nano-thin layers of Sandia-grown quantum wells to the LANL nanocrystals (a.k.a. quantum dots) above the nanolayers.
Image: Marc Achermann.

Feynman offered two challenges at the annual meeting of the American Physical Society, held that year in Caltech, offering a $1000 prize to the first person to solve each of them. Both challenges involved nanotechnology, and the first prize was won by William McLellan, who solved the first. The first problem required someone to build a working electric motor that would fit inside a cube 1/64 inches on each side. McLellan achieved this feat by November 1960 with his 250-microgram 2000-rpm motor consisting of 13 separate parts.

In 1985, the prize for the second challenge was claimed by Stanford Tom Newman, who, working with electrical engineering professor Fabian Pease, used electron lithography. He wrote or engraved the first page of Charles Dickens’ A Tale of Two Cities, at the required scale, on the head of a pin, with a beam of electrons. The main problem he had before he could claim the prize was finding the text after he had written it; the head of the pin was a huge empty space compared with the text inscribed on it. Such small print could only be read with an electron microscope.

In 1989, however, Stanford lost its record, when Donald Eigler and Erhard Schweizer, scientists at IBM’s Almaden Research Center in San Jose were the first to position or manipulate 35 individual atoms of xenon one at a time to form the letters I, B and M using a STM. The atoms were pushed on the surface of the nickel to create letters 5nm tall.

In 1991, Japanese researchers managed to chisel 1.5 nm-tall characters onto a molybdenum disulphide crystal, using the same STM method. Hitachi, at that time, set the record for the smallest microscopic calligraphy ever designed. The Stanford effort failed to surpass the feat, but it, however, introduced a novel technique. Having equaled Hitachi’s record, the Stanford team went a step further. They used a holographic variation on the IBM technique, for instead of fixing the letters onto a support, the new method created them holographically.

In the scientific breakthrough, the Stanford team has now claimed they have written the smallest letters ever – assembled from subatomic-sized bits as small as 0.3 nanometers, or roughly one third of a billionth of a meter. The new super-mini letters created are 40 times smaller than the original effort and more than four times smaller than the IBM initials, states the paper Quantum holographic encoding in a two-dimensional electron gas, published online in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. The new sub-atomic size letters are around a third of the size of the atomic ones created by Eigler and Schweizer at IBM.

Experiments with Crookes tube first demonstrated the particle nature of electrons. In this illustration, the profile of the cross-shaped target is projected against the tube face at right by a beam of electrons.

A subatomic particle is an elementary or composite particle smaller than an atom. Particle physics and nuclear physics are concerned with the study of these particles, their interactions, and non-atomic matter. Subatomic particles include the atomic constituents electrons, protons, and neutrons. Protons and neutrons are composite particles, consisting of quarks.

“Everyone can look around and see the growing amount of information we deal with on a daily basis. All that knowledge is out there. For society to move forward, we need a better way to process it, and store it more densely,” Manoharan said. “Although these projections are stable — they’ll last as long as none of the carbon dioxide molecules move — this technique is unlikely to revolutionize storage, as it’s currently a bit too challenging to determine and create the appropriate pattern of molecules to create a desired hologram,” the authors cautioned. Nevertheless, they suggest that “the practical limits of both the technique and the data density it enables merit further research.”

In 2000, it was Hari Manoharan, Christopher Lutz and Donald Eigler who first experimentally observed quantum mirage at the IBM Almaden Research Center in San Jose, California. In physics, a quantum mirage is a peculiar result in quantum chaos. Their study in a paper published in Nature, states they demonstrated that the Kondo resonance signature of a magnetic adatom located at one focus of an elliptically shaped quantum corral could be projected to, and made large at the other focus of the corral.



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Wikipedia Learn more about Nanotechnology, Electron beam lithography and Stanford University on Wikipedia.
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December 19, 2008

RNA journal submits articles to Wikipedia

RNA journal submits articles to Wikipedia

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Friday, December 19, 2008

Structure of the SmY RNA as published in the Wikipedia article.

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The scientific journal RNA Biology will require authors of articles in a new section on RNA families to submit summaries of their work to Wikipedia, Nature News reports.

Since 2007, the RNA family database (Rfam) has been synchronized with Wikipedia, so that editing Wikipedia alters the database. A small core group of scientists updates the entries in Wikipedia, but a long tail of scientists and other Wikipedians have contributed as well. Due to the scientific nature of the entries, vandalism has not been a large problem, according to Sean Eddy, a computational biologist at the Janelia Farm Research Campus of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute in Ashburn, Virginia.

“The novelty is that for the first time it creates a link between Wikipedia and traditional journal publishing, with its peer-review element,” Alex Bateman from the Rfam database told Nature News. This way, scientists are encouraged to submit to Wikipedia, while they are rewarded with a citable publication in a peer review journal (which in turn drives their funding). In the interview with Nature, the journal’s editor expressed her hopes that other journals would adopt the model.

The new Wikipedia entry will be peer reviewed separately before it is published on Wikipedia. The first article in the new journal section will deal with SmY RNA, a family which now has its own Wikipedia article. According to the online version of the article, it was submitted on November 21, 2008, and accepted five days later. The Wikipedia article was moved from the userpage of one of the co-authors to the article section one day before submission.

In an accompanying editorial, the new Associate Editor-in-Chief of the new section, Paul P. Gardner, explained: “…A Wikipedia entry is usually among the top few hits from a Google search with a molecular biology keyword. Therefore, we would like to ensure that the RNA relevant information in Wikipedia is both reliable and current. We think that this track will provide an important mechanism by which time will be spent by experts to improve the record.”

The author guidelines for this new section contain a mini-guide for the scientists to publishing their first Wikipedia article, mostly from a technical aspect (explaining syntax) rather than as a style guide.

In the field of molecular biology, wiki technology is increasingly being used. For example, two biochemists and Wikipedians, Professor William J. Wedemeyer and Tim Vickers, MSc, PhD, hosted a Wikipedia workshop last Tuesday at the American Society for Cell Biology Annual Meeting.

The Wiki approach is not met with undivided enthusiasm; last March, 250 scientists wrote a petition in the magazine Science to ask GenBank to allow community annotation of its DNA sequences, but their request to ‘Wikify’ GenBank was denied.

In an e-mail to Wikinews and on the Nature website, Prof. Wedemeyer called the new initiative a “promising method for outreach, connecting the scientific world with the public that usually pays for the research,” by “centralizing public outreach in the widely read Wikipedia.” He said that the initiative “seems likely to be effective.”



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November 5, 2008

GNU project releases new version of license to allow Wikimedia projects to switch to Creative Commons license

GNU project releases new version of license to allow Wikimedia projects to switch to Creative Commons license

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Wednesday, November 5, 2008

Wikimedia-logo.svg This article mentions the Wikimedia Foundation, one of its projects, or people related to it. Wikinews is a project of the Wikimedia Foundation.

The logo of the GNU project
Image: Aurelio A. Heckert.

The Free Software Foundation (FSF) has announced a new version of the GNU Free Documentation License (GFDL) which paves the way for the Wikimedia Foundation’s (WMF) projects, including the popular Wikipedia, to switch to the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike (CC-BY-SA) license.

The logo of the Wikimedia Foundation
Copyright: Wikimedia Foundation.

The move was announced following discussions between the Wikimedia Foundation and the FSF.

Erik Möller, deputy director of the WMF, explained the reasoning behind this move. “The underlying motivation of this change is that CC-BY-SA is an easier-to-use license granting the same essential freedoms as the GFDL,” he stated on the official Wikimedia blog. “It is also more widely used by other educational projects, and switching the license would allow Wikimedia wikis to freely share content with those projects.”

Möller also state that “later this month, we will post a re-licensing proposal for all Wikimedia wikis which are currently licensed under the GFDL.”

The change was made in section eleven of the license. It says that conversion to CC-BY-SA is only possible if:

Logo of Creative Commons
Image: Creative Commons.

  • The work is licensed under version free of the GFDL
  • The work has no “Cover Texts” or “Invariant Sections.”
  • The work must have been added to a wiki, or a similar website, before November 1, 2008.

The condition of the license allows for conversion to the CC license before August 1, 2009, although after that date it will no longer be possible.

Cquote1.svg This, in my view, is a serious moral mistake and breach of trust. Cquote2.svg

—Chris Frey

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Was the FSF right to make the change, or was the move a “serious moral mistake and breach of trust”?
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The Wikimedia Foundation formally decided to ask the FSF for the change in December 2007, with the approval of five of the six members of the Wikimedia board, with one member not voting.

Despite the support of the Wikimedia Foundation, some people have voiced their opposition to the move. On Advogato, Chris Frey sent an open letter to the chair of the FSF, Richard Stallman. “I am writing to express my disappointment with the Free Software Foundation regarding the recent release of the GNU Free Documentation License version 1.3,” he stated. “The new version 1.3 adds a new clause, section 11, which, according to the FAQ, allows wiki sites to relicense specific content from GFDL 1.3 to CC-BY-SA 3.0, for content added before November 1, 2008. They have this relicensing option until August 1, 2009. This, in my view, is a serious moral mistake and breach of trust. Even if this new clause does no harm, it is still the wrong thing to do.”

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October 14, 2008

OpenOffice.org 3.0 released by Sun Microsystems

OpenOffice.org 3.0 released by Sun Microsystems

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Tuesday, October 14, 2008

OpenOffice 3.0 comes with new features and performance enhancements.

Sun Microsystems released version 3.0 of its free and open source (FOSS) office suite Openoffice.org on Monday. It has been reported that the new version comes with a number of performance enhancements and new features. Openoffice.org 3.0 now claims to work out of the box in Mac OS X as a native Aqua application.

News sources report the official download servers of OpenOffice.org crashed soon after the release due to heavy downloads. Downloads are however available from a number of mirror sites.

Cquote1.svg As government after government, enterprise after enterprise adopt the Open Document Format, they frequently adopt OpenOffice.org and love it. With 3.0, the application is more interoperable with MS Office, more capable, more extensible. It frees the desktop from vendor lock-in. Cquote2.svg

—Louis Suárez-Potts, community manager of OpenOffice.org

Openoffice.org 3.0 suite includes spreadsheet, word processor, equation editor, presentation tool, relational database and vector drawing software. Full interoperability is available for Microsoft Office 98/XP formats, but offers read only support for OOXML file formats. This version supports the new ODF 1.2 document format. The software is available for many platforms including Linux, Microsoft Windows and Mac, as well as in multiple languages.

Users report OpenOffice.org 3.0 has introduced a new graphical and text-based hybrid equation editor, a mail merge wizard, improved label templates and better interface for outlining. Solver, a spreadsheet add-on for combinatorial optimization problems is included in this version.

Other enhancements highlighted by enthusiasts include collaborative options that allow multiple users to edit documents at the same time and improved drawing and charting tools. OpenOffice.org 3.0 can now display multiple pages during editing and workbooks up to 1024 columns in each spreadsheet.

The download size of OpenOffice.org 3.0 is 163 MB for Mac and requires OS X Tiger or later and an Intel Mac. The installer for Windows is about 145 MB in size.

“As government after government, enterprise after enterprise adopt the Open Document Format, they frequently adopt OpenOffice.org and love it. With 3.0, the application is more interoperable with MS Office, more capable, more extensible. It frees the desktop from vendor lock-in,” claimed Louis Suárez-Potts, community manager of OpenOffice.org.



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September 23, 2008

First Google Android phone unveiled, will be available soon

Filed under: Archived,FLOSS,Google,Internet,Science and technology — admin @ 5:00 am

First Google Android phone unveiled, will be available soon

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Tuesday, September 23, 2008

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The Android interface.
Source: Google Software Development Kit.

The first phone that runs on Google Android was unveiled today by T-Mobile. The announcement of this new handset, named the T-Mobile G1, was made in an event run by T-Mobile USA which took place today.

The event started at 14:30 UTC (10:30 local time) when Cole Brodman, the chief technology and innovation officer of T-Mobile USA, started introducing the people who were going to be present at the launch. These people were Andy Rubin, who represents Google, and Christopher Schlaffer, who is the CTO of Deutsche Telekom.

Five minutes later Schlaffer announced that Google Android will be available for Christmas 2008 on T-Mobile for customers of Deutsche Telekom. The new phone was then revealed by Cole Brodman, who described the phone as “iconic.”

Commentators, however, dismissed claims that the phone was iconic. Marguerite Reardon from CNET said that Android looks rather like the iPhone, and as a result she does not think the phone can be described as iconic. She also said that the Android device looks the Danger Hiptop device, which is also known as the T-Mobile Sidekick.

The new phone will be available free in the UK for users with contracts that cost over 40GB£ (Approximately 74 US$) per month. These planned tariffs are expected to include unlimited web access.

Android is completely open source, and was developed by Google and the Open Handset Alliance, a partnership of over thirty companies working to develop open source software for mobile phones.

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September 2, 2008

Intel acquires mobile linux developer

Tuesday, September 2, 2008

Tux, the Linux mascot Image:  Larry Ewing, Simon Budig and Anja Gerwinski.

Tux, the Linux mascot
Image: Larry Ewing, Simon Budig and Anja Gerwinski.

The logo of OpenedHand Copyright: OpenedHand.

The logo of OpenedHand
Copyright: OpenedHand.

The UK based mobile linux developers OpenedHand have announced that they have been aquired by the Intel Corporation, merging the linux company with the Intel Open Source Technology Center.

“We are pleased to announce that OpenedHand Ltd has been acquired by Intel Corporation,” said OpenedHand in a statement it released on the acquisition. “The OpenedHand team will join the Intel Open Source Technology Center and will focus on the development of the Moblin Software Platform, the optimized software stack for Intel Atom processors.”

The logo of Intel Copyright: Intel.

The logo of Intel
Copyright: Intel.

The statement continued by stating that “Intel will continue supporting open source projects currently led by OpenedHand staff such as Clutter and Matchbox projects, and in most cases, will accelerate these projects as they become an integral part of Moblin.”

Rob Bamforth, an analyst for Quocirca said that this move showed the importance of Linux on mobile devices. He said that “we saw it [large companies purchasing mobile linux development companies] earlier this year with Nokia buying Trolltech, it’s a sign that the mobile space is not as clear cut as the something like the PC one.” He continue by stating that in the PC market “you have a market dominated by PCs with Macs for some specialist users, but mobiles are not like that – there’s a diverse range of products, and, if anything, it’s becoming more diverse.”

Openedhand has previously sold it’s products to companies such as One Laptop Per Child, iRex, Openmoko, ST Microelectronics, Access Co., Vernier and Nokia.


Sources

  • “Intel buys mobile Linux developer OpenedHand”. Computer World, September 2, 2008
  • “Intel acquires Openedhand”. The Inquirer, September 2, 2008
  • “Intel acquires OpenedHand”. OpenedHand, September 2, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Intel acquires mobile Linux developer, OpenedHand

Intel acquires mobile Linux developer, OpenedHand

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Tuesday, September 2, 2008

Tux, the Linux mascot
Image: Larry Ewing, Simon Budig and Anja Gerwinski.

The logo of OpenedHand
Copyright: OpenedHand.

The United Kingdom-based mobile Linux developers OpenedHand have announced that they have been acquired by the Intel Corporation, merging the Linux company with the Intel Open Source Technology Center.

“We are pleased to announce that OpenedHand Ltd has been acquired by Intel Corporation,” said OpenedHand in a statement it released on the acquisition. “The OpenedHand team will join the Intel Open Source Technology Center and will focus on the development of the Moblin Software Platform, the optimized software stack for Intel Atom processors.”

The logo of Intel
Copyright: Intel.

The statement continued by stating that “Intel will continue supporting open source projects currently led by OpenedHand staff such as Clutter and Matchbox projects, and in most cases, will accelerate these projects as they become an integral part of Moblin.”

Rob Bamforth, an analyst for Quocirca, said that this move showed the importance of Linux on mobile devices. He said that “we saw it [large companies purchasing mobile Linux development companies] earlier this year with Nokia buying Trolltech, it’s a sign that the mobile space is not as clear cut as the something like the PC one.” He continued by stating that in the PC market “you have a market dominated by PCs with Macs for some specialist users, but mobiles are not like that – there’s a diverse range of products, and, if anything, it’s becoming more diverse.”

OpenedHand has previously sold its products to companies such as One Laptop Per Child, iRex, Openmoko, ST Microelectronics, Access Co., Vernier and Nokia.



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August 14, 2008

US Court of Appeals upholds free licenses

US Court of Appeals upholds free licenses

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Thursday, August 14, 2008

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The reversed copyright symbol often used to illustrate free media
Image: Zscout370.

Wednesday, the United States Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit reversed a lower court ruling and held that licenses such as Creative Commons (CC) licenses set conditions on the use of copyrighted work as opposed to covenants. This means that if a creative work is being used outside the terms of the license, the person modifying or republishing the work is guilty of copyright infringement for failing to attribute the original work.

Academic and political activist Lawrence Lessig stated it was “a very important victory” for free licensing, and expressed his gratitude for the part Stanford Center for Internet and Society, a project he founded, played in achieving the finding.

A previous court ruling had denied relief to the plaintiff stating that its Artistic License only demanded contractual promises; that a violation thereof would not be, in fact a copyright infringement.



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June 18, 2008

Mozilla breaks new record for most downloads in 24 hours

Wednesday, June 18, 2008

A screenshot of Firefox 3.0 (view full size image)

A screenshot of Firefox 3.0 (view full size image)

Mozilla’s new browser Firefox 3.0 has been downloaded over 8 million times in 24 hours. The Mozilla Foundation has encouraged users worldwide to download their latest browser in an attempt to enter the Guinness Book of World Records, with what is referred to as Download Day 2008. The target of five million downloads was reached long before the 24 hour period was over.

The 24 hour download session ended at 18:16 UTC on June 18th, one hour later than the original time of 17:00. This delay is due to technical problems which included the servers being overwhelmed. For a while after the specified launch time, the Firefox website linked to a download for Firefox 2.

Over 2.88 million of the downloads were from the European Union, 2.56 million from the United States, while only two of the downloads were from Chad, and one from the Falkland Islands. North Korea, Western Sahara, and French Guiana all had no downloads.

The unofficial, inaudited final number of downloads during the 24 hour marathon was 8,290,908. This figure still needs to be checked by the Guinness Book of Records for validity.

If the unofficial figure is accurate, almost 100 copies of the application were downloaded every second.

John Lilly, the CEO of Mozilla commented on the release of Firefox 3. “We’re really proud of Firefox 3 and it just shows what a committed, energized global community can do when they work together,” he said.

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
  • “Firefox 3 downloads smash 5m mark”. ZDNet, June 18, 2008
  • “Firefox 3 launch overwhelms servers”. guardian.co.uk, June 18, 2008
  • “Mozilla Releases Firefox 3 and Redefines the Web Experience”. Mozilla, June 18, 2008
  • “Firefox 3 downloads worldwide”. Mozilla, Retrieved June 18, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
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