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December 3, 2006

Philippine typhoon toll may hit 1,000

Philippine typhoon toll may hit 1,000 – Wikinews, the free news source

Philippine typhoon toll may hit 1,000

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Sunday, December 3, 2006

Philippine president Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo declared a state of national calamity Sunday in the wake of Typhoon Durian, allowing the government to more rapidly release funds needed to bolster search and rescue efforts. Relief efforts in the Philippines faced delays Sunday for survivors, as fears grew of a rising death toll in the archipelago nation from last week’s storm.

Red Cross officials recorded a death toll of at least 406, with 398 others missing and another 489 as injured, based on figures provided by mayors of devastated towns in the eastern Philippines, where Durian hit with 139 mph winds and torrential rains on Thursday.

Canada pledged $870,000 and the Netherlands Red Cross pledged $53,000 to help the country deal with the aftermath of the storm that triggered massive flooding and volcanic mudslides. The United States also promised an undetermined amount of aid.

Many provinces lost power, making communication virtually impossible. In one of the worst hit provinces, Albay, two villages were buried by volcanic mudslides and volunteers were working to recover bodies from the wreckage.

According to the Red Cross, rescue boats were used to survey the damage and take people to the 305 evacuation centers. The Red Cross estimated about 66,616 people were now homeless based upon the number of homes destroyed in the wake of Durian.

Earlier, the National Disaster Coordinating Council said 38,473 displaced people were in evacuation shelters.

Often hit by storms

The Philippines’ location in the northwestern Pacific puts it right in the pathway of the world’s top typhoon generator, according to meteorologists. Durian is the fourth devastating typhoon to strike the Philippines in the past four months, covering the Mayon volcano with so much wind and rain that ash and boulders cascaded down its slopes in walls of black mud that swamped entire villages Thursday.

Hemmed in by geography and poverty, the Philippines has tried to minimize the damage caused by the 20 or so typhoons that hit the sprawling archipelago every year. Nationwide in 2001-05, 2,892 people were killed and 909 others went missing in typhoons and other storms, which caused damage totaling US$521 million, says the National Disaster Coordinating Council.

Anthony Golez, the council’s deputy chief, notes that the estimate doesn’t include losses to employment and other economic opportunities, and that Filipinos should be “bombarded” with disaster information, including stories of the Indian Ocean tsunami two years ago and the February 2006 landslide in the central Philippine village of Guinsaugon that killed more than 1,000.

Senator Richard Gordon, who heads the Philippine National Red Cross, said better planning is needed. “The big problem here in our country is we don’t plan our communities. It’s every man for himself.”

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November 4, 2006

Subtropical storm strikes Washington

Subtropical storm strikes Washington – Wikinews, the free news source

Subtropical storm strikes Washington

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Saturday, November 4, 2006

Storm 91C 01 nov 2006 2030Z.jpg

An unnamed subtropical storm known only as “Storm 91C” packing winds of up to 40 mph struck the U.S. state of Washington on Friday. The storm was a very rare occurrence, and caused minimal damage.

It formed from an extratropical storm around October 30 in the Central Pacific and became subtropical on November 1, and was recognized as “Storm 91C” by the U.S. Navy. The storm was out of the National Hurricane Center (NHC) and the Central Pacific Hurricane Center’s (CPHC) areas of responsibility, and therefore didn’t receive a name. In addition, the CPHC doesn’t issue advisories on subtropical storms.

91Clandfall.jpg

The cyclone moved into the East Pacific and organized into a hurricane-like system with winds up to 60 mph.

The storm began to lose convection and weaken, but managed to make it to Washington and British Columbia as a 40 mph storm with gusts up to 60 mph.

A high wind warning was issued by the National Weather Service for the southern Washington coast to Tillamook.

Heavy rain and high winds were brought along the northern Pacific coast of the United States.

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November 1, 2006

Deadly Typhoon Cimaron makes landfall in Luzon

Deadly Typhoon Cimaron makes landfall in Luzon

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Wednesday, November 1, 2006

Cimaron making landfall

Typhoon Cimaron, known to those in the Philippines as Typhoon Paeng, made landfall on October 29 in Luzon at around 1:00 UTC. Winds of 160 mph were sustained for one minute, were recorded shortly before landfall. Already, it has killed at least nineteen people, injured 58, and at least fifteen people may still be missing in the Philippines. Damage in the country is estimated to have reached $443 million pesos, or $8.8 million United States dollars (USD).

Impact

Cimaron at peak intensity

Deaths and other affects on people

So far, six people have been reported to have been drowned or killed by falling trees in Dinapigue, Isabela province. A further 15 people were injured there.

One of those deaths may have been when waves spawned by Cimaron swept away a 19 year old female student, identified as Clarissa Otrera, while swimming near the shore, drowning her. Her two companions, one 18 years old, the other 20, were also swept away, and are still missing. Another girl, Gretchen Bautista of 15 years of age, was also swept into the open ocean along with Clarissa.

Otera and Bautista were rescued right away and taken to Magsingal District Hospital, where Otera was declared dead.

A search and rescue is under way for the two missing students.

A farmer of 29 years of age drowned when his boat overturned in Isabella, police said.

In addition, a 28 year old woman was killed along with her 6 year old child in Aurora province. Their hut was swept away by the powerful currents.

Three more people drowned in the town of Kasibu, Neuva Vizcaya province.

A four year old girl was killed by a landslide in Bugias, Benguet province, as was a man of 53 years of age in Kalinga province.

In Baguio City, a house with a mother and her two daughters was buried in landslide, injuring all of them, according to fire official Senior Superintendent Carlito Romero.

A woman died in a road accident that also injured seven other people in La Union province.

Another 13-15 people are currently missing, and at least 41 more people not mentioned above were injured to some degree.

In all, Cimaron affected more than 177,000 people.

Damage

Ninety percent of the houses in Dinapigue, Isabela province, were damaged in the town of 5,000 residents, says Mayor Renato Candido.

Over 1,872 houses were damaged, while at least 72 homes were destroyed, 300 of the houses in Baguio City were damaged by powerful winds.

The power in Aurora province was out since Sunday night, but whether or not the electricity has been restored is unknown.

The country’s Department of Agriculture has said that up to 30% of rice and corn harvests may have been ruined.

Original total damage estimates were placed at $400 million pesos, or $8 million United States Dollars, but were revised to $139 million pesos, or $2.79 million USD in total damage. Of that total, $114.39 million pesos, or $2.3 million USD, was from infrastructure and agricultural damage, mostly from the Cagayan Valley. The remaining money was $22.8 million pesos, or $458,600+ USD in damage to roads and bridges and damage to school buildings was worth $2 million pesos, equivalent to $40,230 USD.

Since then, the damage has been reassessed at $443 million pesos, or $8.8 million USD

Other reports of damage include uprooted trees, fallen electrical posts, and numerous blackouts in Luzon.

Aftermath

In the Philippines, Nueva Vizcaya’s provincial board passed a resolution that declared the province under a state of “calamity”, allowing the release of $20 million pesos, or $402,290 USD from the province’s calamity fund.

Power has been confirme to have been restored in most of Isabela and Nueva Vizcaya.

The Office of Civil Defense (OCD) stated that the Army, the Coast Guard, and the Navy were told to give assistance to the victims of the typhoon.

The Philippine National Red Cross noted that many of the agency’s different branches were assisting the storm victims since Monday morning.

Current storm information

At 2100 UTC October 31, the Japan Meteorological Association (JMA) reported the center of Typhoon Cimaron to be near 18.7°N 116.4°E. It had maximum 10-minute sustained winds of 80 knots (150 km/h, 90 mph), with a minimum central pressure of 950 hPa, and was moving almost stationary. At 1800 UTC, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC) reported the center of Typhoon 22W to be located about 270 nm (500 km, 310 miles) south-southeast of Hong Kong, with maximum 1-minute sustained winds of 100 knots (175 km/h, 110 mph), gusting to 125 knots (230 km/h, 145 mph).

Vietnam is being very careful with this system, andplanned on evacuating 200,000 people from the country, even though it is expected that Cimaron will continue west-northwest and then curve northward. Due to the size of the system, the outer rainband of the cyclone may be felt in Vietnam.

On November 1, the evacuations were put on hold when the Vietnamese realized that Cimaron would have little impact on them.

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October 9, 2006

Tropical Storm Norman forms southwest of Baja California

Tropical Storm Norman forms southwest of Baja California

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Monday, October 9, 2006

Hurricanes – 2006

Related stories
Recent hurricanes in 2006
  • Hurricane Ernesto
  • Hurricane Florence
  • Hurricane Gordon
  • Hurricane Helene
  • Hurricane Isaac
Hurricane Isaac

Hurricane Isaac

External/Inter-wiki links
  • 2006 Atlantic hurricane season
  • 2006 Pacific hurricane season
  • List of notable tropical cyclones
  • Wikipedia’s entry on Hurricanes
  • Wiktionary’s definition of a hurricane

The National Hurricane Center Tropical Prediction Center has upgraded Tropical Depression 15-E to Tropical Storm status. The storm, now officially Tropical Storm Norman, is the 15th named storm of the 2006 Pacific hurricane season. The storm currently has maximum sustained winds of 45 miles per hour. Norman is located well to the southwest of Baja California, and is currently tracking north at 7 miles per hour.

The storm is expected to slowly curve to the northeast as it slowly strengthening, then slowly weaken when it moves over colder waters. There is a chance that it could bring winds and rain to Baja California before it dissipates.

All individuals who may be impacted by this storm are urged to track its progress as it develops over the next few days.

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October 3, 2006

Tropical Storm Isaac hits Newfoundland

Tropical Storm Isaac hits Newfoundland – Wikinews, the free news source

Tropical Storm Isaac hits Newfoundland

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Tuesday, October 3, 2006

Hurricanes – 2006

Related stories
Recent hurricanes in 2006
  • Hurricane Ernesto
  • Hurricane Florence
  • Hurricane Gordon
  • Hurricane Helene
  • Hurricane Isaac
Hurricane Isaac

Hurricane Isaac

External/Inter-wiki links
  • 2006 Atlantic hurricane season
  • 2006 Pacific hurricane season
  • List of notable tropical cyclones
  • Wikipedia’s entry on Hurricanes
  • Wiktionary’s definition of a hurricane

Hurricane Isaac was downgraded to a tropical storm as it hit Newfoundland today. Isaac was located about 120 miles south of Cape Race, Newfoundland, at 2 p.m. AST, and moving to the north-northeast at 40 mph. Isaac had top sustained winds near 60 mph with higher gusts. Tropical Storm Isaac swirled away from the island and weakened quickly.

“Isaac has weakened from a hurricane to a tropical storm this morning,” the National Hurricane Center in Florida announced in a storm bulletin posted at 11 a.m. “The tropical storm continues racing towards Newfoundland and should cross the Avalon Peninsula, the southeastern region of Newfoundland this afternoon, where a tropical storm warning remains in effect.

“Isaac is a very small storm and its effects may not be felt across the entire Avalon. Accordingly, we no longer expect tropical storm force winds in regions beyond the Avalon Peninsula. Once a Category 1 hurricane as it formed in the Atlantic Ocean, Isaac has weakened considerably,” said the Canadian Hurricane Centre based in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Isaac’s rain was heavy in the Atlantic province but minor damage was made.

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October 1, 2006

Hurricane Isaac heads toward Atlantic Canada

Hurricane Isaac heads toward Atlantic Canada

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Sunday, October 1, 2006

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Forecasters are predicting that Hurricane Isaac could hit Atlantic Canada as early as next week. The provinces Nova Scotia and Newfoundland have been advised to monitor the progress of Isaac.

Forecasters said Isaac should stay to the east of Bermuda, but the Canadian Maritimes and Newfoundland could feel the outer edges of the storm.

“Some areas of Eastern Canada could feel the outer reaches of Isaac by sometime Monday or Tuesday. It was expected to strengthen slightly before then,” said hurricane specialist Eric Blake.

Three years ago the Maritimers suffered through Hurricane Juan. On September 29, 2003, in Nova Scotia, Juan killed two people, smashed buildings and left about 300,000 homes and businesses without power.

The Atlantic hurricane season began on June 1 and ends November 30. Isaac had top sustained winds near 75 kilometres per hour by 11 p.m. ET (UTC−5), the U.S. National Hurricane Center said. Isaac is the fifth hurricane and the ninth named storm of the 2006 Atlantic hurricane season.

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September 12, 2006

Bermuda hit hard by hurricane Florence

Bermuda hit hard by hurricane Florence – Wikinews, the free news source

Bermuda hit hard by hurricane Florence

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Tuesday, September 12, 2006

Hurricane Florence was positioned at 35.8 N 63.9 W, at 11 p.m. EDT (UTC – 4 hr), with maximum winds blowing at 85 mph and gusts of up to 105 mph. The hurricane is moving in a north-easterly direction at 18 mph and is showing signs of weakening.

The government of Bermuda has discontinued the Tropical Storm warning it issued only after it blew away window panes, glasses and roofs. No deaths have been reported though there are reports of minor injuries. The hurricane has knocked out power supply to thousands of people.

The Bermuda Electric Light Company (BELCO) expects the restoration of supply to be complete in few days.

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August 30, 2006

Tropical Storm Ernesto weakens

Tropical Storm Ernesto weakens – Wikinews, the free news source

Tropical Storm Ernesto weakens

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Wednesday, August 30, 2006

Satellite photograph of Hurricane Ernesto

Tropical Storm Ernesto has weakened over Florida. It is expected to make another landfall on the North Carolina coast as a tropical storm. Ernesto came ashore early this morning in the Florida Keys with less intensity than expected by forecasters. The storm had weakened to a tropical depression as it moved up the Florida peninsula. It is expected to go to Charleston, South Carolina. Tropical storm watches have been issued for Savannah, Georgia, to Morehead City, North Carolina.

At 5 p.m. local time (2100 GMT), Ernesto’s sustained winds were about 35 mph (56 kph), as stated by the National Hurricane Center. The center of the system was still over Florida, about 55 miles (90 km) south-southwest of Cape Canaveral.

Forecasters say Ernesto could regain tropical storm status with peak winds exceeding 40 miles (64 kilometers) an hour.

“Ernesto has the potential to regain tropical storm strength on Thursday over the Atlantic,” the hurricane center said.

Two deaths were reported in separate wrecks in Florida.

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August 27, 2006

Tropical Storm Ernesto nears the US Coast

Tropical Storm Ernesto nears the US Coast

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Sunday, August 27, 2006

As Tropical Storm Ernesto moves toward the US coast, the weather system has been downgraded to a Tropical Storm, but forecasters warn the storm could re-strengthen into a category 2 or possibly category 3 hurricane by Thursday.

Information on the storm’s location and direction can also be found on the NOAA‘s National Hurricane Center web page and on NIST Shortwave Radio Station WWV on 2.500, 5.000, 10.000, 15.000, and 20.000 MHz at 8, 9, and 10 minutes past the hour. Propagation for evening reception is usually best on 10 and 15 MHz. The ARRL have announced that the WX4NHC Amateur Radio Hurricane net will convene at 13:00 UTC on 14.325 MHz (SSB) on Monday, 28 August. HWN Assistant Net Manager Bobby Graves (KB5HAV) has announced that a Bilingual Support Team will be present to assist with Spanish language translation. “Ernesto could become a potentially dangerous hurricane as it moves across the northwestern Caribbean Sea and the Gulf of Mexico,” Julio Ripoll (WD4R) said, citing NHC forecaster Jack Bevin. Ripoll said the “Cone of Uncertainty” still includes most of South Florida and the Florida Keys. WX4NHC will be used for providing observed and measured weather data to the NHC for assistance in forecasting

SATERN will be active on 14.235 MHz (SSB) to handle health & welfare calls.

The Government of Cuba has issued a hurricane watch for the provinces of Las Tunas, Granma, Holguin, Santiago de Cuba and Guantanamo.

The State of Florida has ordered a tourist evacuation of the Florida Keys and declared a State of Emergency in preparation for the Tropical Storm’s landfall, which is expected in the next 24 hours.

The Department of Homeland security has warned that New Orleans could endure storm damage. One year ago Tuesday, Hurricane Katrina caused widespread devastation to New Orleans after dykes designed to hold back the Gulf of Mexico failed, flooding the city and leaving thousands stranded for days without access to food, water or shelter. The subsequent evacuation and cleanup left a considerable dent in the US economy.

Economic forecasters say that the storm could cause a sharp rise in electronic trading overnight. The possibility of landfall in the Gulf of Mexico caused natural gas commodity prices to rise by 6% on Friday. The Gulf of Mexico is also a key production center for crude oil. After the devastation caused by Hurricane Katrina, refined oil production dropped by 22%, causing a surge in the price of gasoline at the pumps. In Canada pump prices soared to $1.34/litre. Simliar increases were seen across the US in Katrina’s wake, reaching $1.15 US/gallon.

John Kerr is the editor of Global Resources Trader, a newsletter of MarketWatch.

The storm is “certainly one of the big drivers behind oil and gas right now, but there are so many uncertainties … from Venezuela’s new Chinese deal, to Israel threatening to attack Iran and new violence in Nigeria,” said Kerr, in comments ahead of the weather system’s upgrade. “On top of all that, the BP announcement that everything is not so hunky-dory in Alaska is rallying prices too,” he said (quote from marketwatch.com)

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August 1, 2006

Tropical storm Chris strengthens

Tropical storm Chris strengthens – Wikinews, the free news source

Tropical storm Chris strengthens

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Hurricanes – 2006

Related stories
Recent hurricanes in 2006
  • Hurricane Ernesto
  • Hurricane Florence
  • Hurricane Gordon
  • Hurricane Helene
  • Hurricane Isaac
Hurricane Isaac

Hurricane Isaac

External/Inter-wiki links
  • 2006 Atlantic hurricane season
  • 2006 Pacific hurricane season
  • List of notable tropical cyclones
  • Wikipedia’s entry on Hurricanes
  • Wiktionary’s definition of a hurricane

Tropical storm Chris

Tuesday, August 1, 2006

Tropical Storm Chris has formed in the Atlantic Ocean. Located at 18.3N, 61.6 W, or about 75 kilometers (45 miles) North-Northeast of Barbuda, and moving West-northwest at 20 km/h (13mph). Chris has wind speeds of 95 km/h (60mph), with tropical storm force winds extending 35 km (25 m) from the center of circulation. Chris’ most recent minimum barmetric pressure, measured by aircraft, was 1003mb (29.62 in). Chris is expected to produce total rainfall amounts of 3 to 5 inches over the northern Leeward Islands, the US Virgin Islands, and eastern portions of Puerto Rico, with possible maximum amounts of 8 inches through Wednesday.

A Tropical Storm Warning is in effect for the islands of Antigua, Barbuda, Anguilla, St. Kitts, Nevis, Saba, St. Eustatius, St. Barthelemy, St. Martin, St. Maarten, Puerto Rico, and the US and British Virgin Islands. A Tropical Storm Warning means that tropical storm conditions are expected within the warning area within the next 12 to 24 hours.

0500 AM AST SAT AUG 05 2006 …CHRIS FORECAST TO DISSIPATE OVER CUBA TODAY…THIS IS THE LAST ADVISORY…



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