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September 17, 2011

Zimbabwe minister warns media

Zimbabwe minister warns media – Wikinews, the free news source

Zimbabwe minister warns media

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Saturday, September 17, 2011

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The Zimbabwe Minister of Media, Information and Publicity, Webster Shamu, warned media organisations may have their licences revoked for misusing their licenses to ‘vilify’ Zimbabwe and its leadership.

The warning follows reports in the media alleged to attack the former President of Zimbabwe, Robert Mugabe. Shamu claimed that some non-government media organisations were misusing their licenses to denounce Mugabe, and that this misuse increased to affect approaching elections.

Shamu drew parallels with British and US media policy, saying Britain has many media gag laws that are accepted without complaint. He continued by asserting both the United States and Britain are hypocritical, claiming they “have got some of the most draconian media laws on earth which severely restrict media freedom under the guise of protecting their national security”.

Raphael Khumalo, chief executive officer of Alpha Media Holdings, publisher of Newsday and the weekly Independent and Standard papers, was reported in the Voice of America to have said his company will only take the warnings from Shamu seriously if he approaches them formally. Chairman Njabulo Ncube, of the Zimbabwe chapter of the Media Institute of Southern Africa, told VOA all media organisations across Zimbabwe must adhere to the same rules, be they independent or state-controlled.

The warnings by Shamu come after a Wikileaks story revealed alleged conversations between US diplomats and Zimbabweans close to Mugabe.



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April 24, 2010

Iranian president Ahmadinejad in Zimbabwe for trade fair

Iranian president Ahmadinejad in Zimbabwe for trade fair

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Saturday, April 24, 2010

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Iranian president Mahmoud Ahmadinejad.
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Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the president of Iran, is visiting Zimbabwe to sign trade agreements with the country and meet with Zimbabwean president Robert Mugabe.

Ahmadinejad, in comments at the trade fair located in Bulawayo, said the amount of trade between the two nations should be increased. The Iranian president remarked that Zimbabwe and Iran made a friendship based on a principled stand against Western interference, and accused the West of seeking control over Zimbabwe’s natural resources.

Mugabe commented: “Because of the principled positions we have taken at both the domestic and international level, Zimbabwe and Iran have been unjustly vilified and punished by Western countries. Be also assured, comrade president, of Zimbabwe’s continuous support of Iran’s just cause on the nuclear issue.”

The US wants new UN sanctions against Iran, due to the latter’s refusal to stop its uranium enrichment, saying that it it is intended for nuclear weapons. Iranian authorities, however, insist the programme is only for peaceful purposes.

According to the The Sunday Telegraph, the trades will consist of Iran supplying oil to Zimbabwe, in exchange for the latter’s allowing Iran to obtain access to uranium deposits in the country. “Iran secured the exclusive uranium rights last month when minister of state for Presidential affairs, Didymus Mutasa visited Tehran. That is when the formal signing of the deal was made, away from the glare of the media,” a Zimbabwean government source stated, as quoted by the Telegraph.

Ahmadinejad’s visit brought another source of friction between Mugabe and Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai. Tsvangirai’s Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) party said that Mugabe’s invitation sent the wrong message to the rest of the world as Zimbabwe was re-engaging the West and trying to rebuild its economy. MDC sources said Tsvangirai flew to South Africa on Thursday, the day on which Ahmadinejad arrived.

In a statement, the MDC remarked that “Ahmadinejad’s visit is not only an insult to the people of Zimbabwe, but an affront to democracy and to the oppressed people of Iran.”



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November 6, 2009

Zimbabwe prime minister Tsvangirai ends cabinet boycott

Zimbabwe prime minister Tsvangirai ends cabinet boycott

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Friday, November 6, 2009

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Morgan Tsvangirai

Morgan Tsvangirai, the prime minister of Zimbabwe, said on Thursday that he was calling off his boycott of the coalition government with president Robert Mugabe. The prime minister said he was giving Mugabe and his Zanu-PF party 30 days to work on “the pertinent issues we are concerned about”.

Tsvangirai and his Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) party had pulled out of the coalition government three weeks ago, protesting what they called harassment of Mugabe opponents and accusing the president of not fulfilling the power-sharing agreement agreed to in February.

“We have suspended our disengagement from the GPA [Global Political Agreement] with immediate effect and we will give President Robert Mugabe 30 days to implement the agreement on the pertinent issues we are concerned about,” Tsvangirai said. His move came after he attended a meeting in Mozambique with the Southern African Development Community.



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October 26, 2009

Zimbabwean police raid MDC party\’s offices

Zimbabwean police raid MDC party’s offices

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Monday, October 26, 2009

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According to the Zimbabwean finance minister, a building belonging to Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai’s Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) party was raided by police on Friday. The police had reportedly been searching for weapons.

Morgan Tsvangirai (2009)
Image: Harry Wad.

The MDC secretary-general, Tendai Biti, said that the house, located in a suburb of Zimbabwe’s capital Harare, was “ransacked” by several dozen armed policemen after dark on Friday. One of the rooms in the building had been searched, and police confiscated what Biti called “valuable party documents”.

Cquote1.svg …this is the price we now pay for that decision. Cquote2.svg

—Tendai Biti

The secretary-general accused President Robert Mugabe’s Zanu-PF party of being behind the raid, wanting the country’s unity government to fail, describing it as “provocation”. “They are behind this attack. Our decision of pulling out of the inclusive government infuriated ZANU-PF and this is the price we now pay for that decision,” he said.

The police have not yet released a statement regarding the raid.

Tsvangirai and his MDC party had pulled out of the coalition government last week, accusing Mugabe’s party of not complying with the unity government deal made last year, and oppressing opponents. Mugabe, however, dismissed the boycott, calling it a “non-event”, and said that his party would not alter its plans or agree to the MDC’s demands.



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October 20, 2009

Zimbabwe cabinet meets without MDC ministers after boycott

Zimbabwe cabinet meets without MDC ministers after boycott

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Tuesday, October 20, 2009

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Zimbabwean president Robert Mugabe led a cabinet meeting on Tuesday without the presence of unity partner Prime Minister Morgan Tsvangirai, who was out of the country on a regional tour to appeal for help with mediation. This comes after Tsvangirai and his Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) party pulled out of the unity government several days ago, protesting what they called “dishonest and unreliable” behaviour by Mugabe.

Robert Mugabe

Morgan Tsvangirai

Zimbabwe state media reported on Tuesday that President Mugabe will not recognise Tsvangirai’s suspension of ties with the government until he is formally informed. The state-owned daily newspaper, The Herald, quoted Mugabe’s spokesman, George Charamba, as saying Tsvangirai is still prime minister and is expected to attend cabinet meetings.

“Government is not run through media statements. In the same way that President Mugabe formally appointed him to the post of Prime Minister he must also communicate any decision to disengage or whatever it is they are calling it, in a formal manner,” Charamba said.

“This can be done orally or in writing but in a formal manner. From that point of view nothing has happened. Until the communication is done formally the president has no reason or any grounds to think or know otherwise,” he said.

Tsvangirai, who “disengaged” from the country’s unity government last week, was accused by the newspaper of traveling without cabinet approval. The leader of the MDC party is on a ten-day trip of Southern African Development Community countries, who helped to negotiate the troubled power sharing agreement in Zimbabwe. Tsvangirai is not due to return to Zimbabwe until sometime next week.

According to The Herald, government officials said that Tsvangirai had attempted to obtain cabinet authority for his trip while en route to the airport, but was told that it was too late to receive it.

However, University of Zimbabwe political science professor John Makumbe said he believed Tsvangirai’s partial withdrawal from the national unity government was long overdue and ZANU-PF’s reaction is mere posturing. “Morgan Tsvangirai has done the right thing, he must light fires and make ZANU-PF run around putting the fires out. What he has been doing to date is agreeing to be treated like a tea-boy, he has been told what to do and he has done it without asking questions,” Makumbe said.

He said that Mugabe’s ZANU-PF party couldn’t risk going it alone, as Tsvangirai has a stronger claim to legitimacy as his party won the elections in March 2008.

Ministers from a splinter faction of the MDC led by Arthur Mutambara attended the cabinet meeting. Mutambara, who is one of two deputy prime ministers, said at a news conference on Monday that he was talking to both Mugabe and Tsvangirai. He said the national unity government is Zimbabwe’s only hope of moving forward. “We are determined to give this government a fighting chance because in our mind there is no plan B,” Mutambara said.

Tsvangirai announced last week that his party would not withdraw from the unity government altogether, but would boycott the executive branch whose ministries it shares with the ZANU-PF party. He cited the reluctance of Mugabe to implement matters that had been agreed to in the so-called Global Political Agreement, which brought the national unity government to power.

Among the outstanding issues is the appointment of governors and the alleged harassment of his party members and Members of Parliament. His announcement came two days after agriculture deputy minister designate Roy Bennett was arrested and re-detained on charges of insurgency and terror. Bennett has since been released on bail, but Tsvangirai has said his party will not participate in government until all the issues he raised have been resolved.



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October 19, 2009

Zimababwe Zanu-PF party dismisses Tsvangirai unity boycott

Zimababwe Zanu-PF party dismisses Tsvangirai unity boycott

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Monday, October 19, 2009

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Zimbabwe’s ZANU-PF party has said that government business will continue despite the opposition party’s decision to stop working with its unity government partner. A spokesman for president Robert Mugabe dismissed the boycott by the leader of the Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) Morgan Tsvangirai as “needless excitement”.

Morgan Tsvangirai (2009)
Image: Harry Wad.

Tsvangirai and his party had pulled out of the coalition government on Friday, saying that Mugabe had been “dishonest and unreliable”.

Spokesman George Charamba said to the Sunday Mail newspaper that “the MDC-T has disengaged from nothing. It’s sound and fury signifying nothing. The MDC-T president knows that. It’s a poor protest,” he said.

Charamba said that Mugabe has been too busy with ceremonial duties to react to Tsvangirai’s boycott. “I suppose the president will find time when the right time comes,” he said.

The Sunday Mail quoted Charamba as saying that a cabinet meeting will go ahead as scheduled on Tuesday and that binding decisions will be made despite the MDC boycott. “As you will certainly see on Tuesday, cabinet will be held. The agenda for the meeting has been circulated and decisions that are binding will be taken. Remember, cabinet does not function through a quorum.”

Cquote1.svg As you will certainly see on Tuesday, cabinet will be held. Cquote2.svg

—George Charamba

Tensions between Mugabe’s ZANU-PF party and the MDC have been constant since the unity government was formed early this year. Regional leaders pressured the parties to share power after last year’s disputed and violence-plagued elections.

The latest crisis was sparked by the re-detention of Roy Bennett, a white farmer who the MDC has nominated to be deputy minister of agriculture. Bennett is awaiting trial on terrorism charges, and already spent a month in prison earlier this year before being released on bail. The MDC has said that he is innocent.

Tsvangirai said on Friday that if the political crisis escalates further, the only solution would be to hold new elections under international supervision.



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October 16, 2009

Zimbabwe’s MDC pulls out of unity government

Filed under: Africa,Politics and conflicts,Review,Robert Mugabe,Zimbabwe — admin @ 5:00 am

Friday, October 16, 2009

Morgan Tsvangirai in June 2009

Morgan Tsvangirai, the leader of the Zimbabwean Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) and the country’s Prime Minister, has pulled out of the coalition government, accusing Zimbabwean president Robert Mugabe of being “dishonest and unreliable”.

Tsvangirai and his MDC party said that they would pull out from the government until outstanding issues in a power-sharing agreement between Tsvangirai and Mugabe were resolved. He made the announcement following a crisis meeting that was called after the MDC treasurer general was indicted on charges of terrorism.

Tsvangirai said that “this party, for now, cannot renege on the people’s mandate.However, it is our right to disengage from a dishonest and unreliable partner.”

“In this regard, whilst being in government we shall forthwith disengage from Zanu-PF [Mugabe’s party] and in particular from cabinet and the council of ministers until such time as confidence and respect is restored among us,” he said.

A spokesman for the Zanu-PF party responded to Tsvangirai’s move. “If MDC wants to disengage […] we don’t have a problem with that. We were having problems with MDC, working together. We have been trying but it was not easy,” said spokesman Ephraim Masawi.

The former Information and Publicity minister, Jonathan Moyo, who is a member of the Zanu-PF, accused the MDC of acting “childishly”.

The Zimbabwean coalition government was launched eight months ago, after a heavily disputed election that was marred by violence. However, there have since been accusations that Mugabe and his Zanu-PF party are not willing to give up its power.



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Zimbabwe’s MDC pulls out of unity government

Filed under: Africa,Politics and conflicts,Review,Robert Mugabe,Zimbabwe — admin @ 5:00 am

Friday, October 16, 2009

Morgan Tsvangirai in June 2009

Morgan Tsvangirai, the leader of the Zimbabwean Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) and the country’s Prime Minister, has pulled out of the coalition government, accusing Zimbabwean president Robert Mugabe of being “dishonest and unreliable”.

Tsvangirai and his MDC party said that they would pull out from the government until outstanding issues in a power-sharing agreement between Tsvangirai and Mugabe were resolved. He made the announcement following a crisis meeting that was called after the MDC treasurer general was indicted on charges of terrorism.

Tsvangirai said that “this party, for now, cannot renege on the people’s mandate.However, it is our right to disengage from a dishonest and unreliable partner.”

“In this regard, whilst being in government we shall forthwith disengage from Zanu-PF [Mugabe’s party] and in particular from cabinet and the council of ministers until such time as confidence and respect is restored among us,” he said.

A spokesman for the Zanu-PF party responded to Tsvangirai’s move. “If MDC wants to disengage […] we don’t have a problem with that. We were having problems with MDC, working together. We have been trying but it was not easy,” said spokesman Ephraim Masawi.

The former Information and Publicity minister, Jonathan Moyo, who is a member of the Zanu-PF, accused the MDC of acting “childishly”.

The Zimbabwean coalition government was launched eight months ago, after a heavily disputed election that was marred by violence. However, there have since been accusations that Mugabe and his Zanu-PF party are not willing to give up its power.



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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Zimbabwe\’s MDC pulls out of unity government

Zimbabwe’s MDC pulls out of unity government

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Friday, October 16, 2009

Zimbabwe
Other stories from Zimbabwe
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Location of Zimbabwe

A map showing the location of Zimbabwe

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Zimbabwe, see the Zimbabwe Portal
Flag of Zimbabwe.svg

Morgan Tsvangirai in June 2009

Morgan Tsvangirai, the leader of the Zimbabwean Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) and the country’s Prime Minister, has pulled out of the coalition government, accusing Zimbabwean president Robert Mugabe of being “dishonest and unreliable”.

Tsvangirai and his MDC party said that they would pull out from the government until outstanding issues in a power-sharing agreement between Tsvangirai and Mugabe were resolved. He made the announcement following a crisis meeting that was called after the MDC treasurer general was indicted on charges of terrorism.

Tsvangirai said that “this party, for now, cannot renege on the people’s mandate. However, it is our right to disengage from a dishonest and unreliable partner.”

“In this regard, whilst being in government we shall forthwith disengage from Zanu-PF [Mugabe’s party] and in particular from cabinet and the council of ministers until such time as confidence and respect is restored among us,” he said.

The Prime Minister, however, added that the pullout would most likely be only temporary, and that the MDC would still conduct some activities in the parliament. “We are not really pulling out officially,” Tsvangirai said.

A spokesman for the Zanu-PF party responded to Tsvangirai’s move. “If MDC wants to disengage […] we don’t have a problem with that. We were having problems with MDC, working together. We have been trying but it was not easy,” said spokesman Ephraim Masawi.

The former Information and Publicity minister, Jonathan Moyo, who is a member of the Zanu-PF, accused the MDC of acting “childishly”.

The Zimbabwean coalition government was launched eight months ago, after a heavily disputed election that was marred by violence. Tsvangirai obtained a majority of votes in the 2008 presidential elections, but decided to withdraw from a run-off election with Mugabe, claiming that Mugabe had used violence against his supporters. A deal was eventually made, under which Mugabe would retain his post, but Tsvangirai would assume the position of prime minister. Zanu-PF and Mugabe, however, have still been accused of being unwilling to give up their power or to reform.



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March 21, 2009

US says Zimbabwe government has “a long way to go” before sanctions are lifted

US says Zimbabwe government has “a long way to go” before sanctions are lifted

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Saturday, March 21, 2009

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Robert Mugabe

The United States has said that the African nation of Zimbabwe has “a long way to go” before the former lifts the sanctions it has imposed on the country. This comes after an effort by Zimbabwe to raise international funding for a economic recovery plan, which calls for US$5 billion in construction spending.

“To the European Union and the United States, I appeal for the removal of your sanctions which are inhuman, cruel and unwarranted,” said Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe. “SADC (Southern African Development Community) and the African Union have, in support of our inclusive government’s economic stabilisation and recovery efforts, already strongly called for the removal of these sanctions. We thus repeat our loud call for their immediate removal.”

The US government refused to do so, saying that Zimbabwe had not shown any indication of improving their human rights record or reforming governance.

“We’re not in any kind of discussion with […] the government of Zimbabwe on removing our targeted sanctions,” said a spokesman for the US State Department. “We remain very concerned about the plight of the Zimbabwean people who have been under such terrible suffering. And we’re going to continue to try to help the people of Zimbabwe. With regard to the government, it’s got a long way to go before we will look at removing any targeted sanctions.”

Both the European Union and the US imposed a ban on travel and an asset freeze on Zimbabwe in 2002, on accusations of human rights abuses and election irregularities by the latter.

Zimbabwe, which had previously been a model country for the continent, has recently experienced an economic collapse and a humanitarian crisis. Inflation rates have skyrocketed in the nation, reaching over 200,000,000%, causing severe food shortages. There has also been an outbreak of cholera, which has claimed the lives of over 4,000 people.



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