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August 14, 2016

Turkey and Iran pledge to cooperate for Syria

Turkey and Iran pledge to cooperate for Syria

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Sunday, August 14, 2016

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Turkey‘s foreign minister, Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu and Iran‘s career diplomat Javad Zarif have decided to join forces in resolving the civil war in Syria, regardless of being on opposite sides of the crisis.

File photo of Mevlüt Çavuşoğlu, 2015.
Image: Mohammad Hassanzadeh.

Diplomat’s, Çavuşoğlu and Zarif have both pledged greater cooperation on the conflict in Syria at a joint news conference in Ankara on Friday. The coming together of these two neighbouring nations has come as a surprise to many as both Cavusoglu and Zarif have held opposing positions on Syria, with Iran supporting President Bashar al-Assad of Syria and Turkey, backing his political departure. However, despite their differences on this matter, the two nations are prepared and are now willing to strengthen their relationship together, so that they can work together in fighting extremism in Syria and allow it to once again become a nation that is without threats and danger.

File photo of Javad Zarif, 2014.
Image: Bundesministerium für Europa, Integration und Äusseres (flickr).

Since Turkeys failed coup just last month, Iran has been expressing great praise to the nation. Iran has supported Turkeys choice of defying the coup and not going ahead with force as was planned. Zarif has stated that he no longer supports the decisions of overthrows and that they hold no place in Iran. Since the failed coup attempt by Turkey on July 15, Zarif had not visited Turkey again until recently at the joint news conference in Ankara. This meeting between the Iranian and Turkish officials is said to be the first step in bringing forward a calm and tranquil Syria.

The union of Çavuşoğlu and Zarif in their mutual goal to bring Syria back into a positive strife, follows a similar agreement that was made between the Turkish government and Russia over Syria, directing thoughts that the Erdoğan government is radically rethinking their position on the Syrian Civil War conflict.

It has been stated by the Turkish foreign ministry that Javad Zarif will also be meeting with the Turkish President, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan.



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August 8, 2016

Turkish president shows suport for reintroduction of the death penalty at cross party anti-coup rally

Turkish president shows suport for reintroduction of the death penalty at cross party anti-coup rally

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Monday, August 8, 2016

Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan has told crowds of at least a million people that he would approve the re-instigation of the death penalty if the parliament voted for it.

Recep Tayyip Erdoğan

Opposition leaders and religious figures joined Erdogan at the mass rally, in which the president blamed the coup on the US based cleric Fethullah Gülen and called for his network to be destroyed within the laws of Turkey. However the pro-Kurdish HDP party was not invited due to its alleged links with Kurdish militants. Massive flags were held by cranes as crowds held banners of the Erdogan and Turkey’s founding father Mustafa Kemal Atatürk. The Turkish media reported that 5 million people turned up to the rally, and the event was broadcasted on large screens in all the provinces across Turkey.

Security was tight, 15,000 police guarded the rally where supporters had to pass through one of 165 metal detectors. Two helicopters circled the air over the rally and there were anti-aircraft batteries at the event. More than 200 boats and thousands of busses were payed for by the government in order to make attendance to the rally easier. The authorities also provided attenders with hats and flags, and the wounded and family of the dead were given special passes for seated areas.

This comes after a bloody coup attempt from a faction within Turkey`s army in which 270 people were killed after Erdogan called for unarmed civilians to fight back against the coup. Since the coup was put down tens of thousands of people have last their jobs in the judiciary, media, education, healthcare, military and local government, and nearly 18,000 people have been detained. Local branches of the ruling AKP party have been told to begin a purge of supporters of ex-Erdogan ally cleric Fethullah Gülen. The response of the Turkish government to the coup has received international criticism from human rights organisations that have urged restraint on the part of Erdogan’s government; and politicians, with some like leader of the small German liberal party the free democrats comparing the coup to the burning down of the reichstag in 1933.

Turkish officials have said that such people fail to understand the threat to the Turkish state and that they seem to care more about the rights of the plotters than than the brutality of the events themselves.


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Turkish president shows suport for reintroduction of death penalty at cross-party anti-coup rally

Turkish president shows suport for reintroduction of death penalty at cross-party anti-coup rally

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Monday, August 8, 2016

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Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan on Sunday told a crowd of at least a million people he would approve the re-instigation of the death penalty if the parliament voted for it.

File photo of Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, 2016.
Image: Cancillería del Ecuador.

Opposition leaders and religious figures joined Erdogan at the mass rally, in which the president blamed the coup on the US-based cleric Fethullah Gülen and called for his network to be destroyed within the laws of Turkey. However the HDP party, which favors the Kurdish minority in Turkey and has been accused of connections to Kurdish terrorists, was not invited. Massive flags were held by cranes as crowds held banners of the Erdogan and Turkey’s founding father Mustafa Kemal Atatürk. The Turkish media reported five million people turned up to the rally, and the event was broadcast on large screens in all the provinces across Turkey.

Security was tight, 15,000 police guarded the rally where supporters had to pass through one of 165 metal detectors. Two helicopters circled the air over the rally and there were anti-aircraft batteries at the event. More than 200 boats and thousands of buses were payed for by the government in order to make attendance to the rally easier. The authorities also provided attenders with hats and flags, and the wounded and family of the dead were given special passes for seated areas.

This comes after a bloody coup attempt from a faction within Turkey’s army in which 270 people were killed after Erdogan called for unarmed civilians to fight back against the coup. Since the coup was put down tens of thousands of people have lost their jobs working for the government and nearly 18,000 people have been detained. Local branches of the ruling AKP party have been told remove of supporters of ex-Erdogan ally cleric Fethullah Gülen from their ranks. The response of the Turkish government to the coup has received international criticism from human rights organisations that have urged restraint on the part of Erdogan’s government; and politicians, with some like leader of the small German liberal party the free democrats comparing the coup to the burning down of the reichstag in 1933.

Turkish officials have said those criticising them do not understand the threat to the Turkish state and seemed to care more about the coup plotters than their dead victims.


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July 18, 2016

Over 250 killed in failed coup attempt in Turkey

Over 250 killed in failed coup attempt in Turkey

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Monday, July 18, 2016

Turkey
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  • 18 July 2016: Over 250 killed in failed coup attempt in Turkey
  • 29 June 2016: Suicide bombers attack Istanbul’s Ataturk airport
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  • 18 June 2016: UEFA Euro 2016, day 8: Italy-Sweden, Czech Republic-Croatia, Spain-Turkey
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In an unsuccessful coup attempt apparently by elements of the Turkish Armed Forces in Istanbul and Ankara, 265 people were killed and 1440 were injured, Turkish Prime Minister Binali Yıldırım reported on Saturday. Following the incident, 2,839 soldiers and officers were detained and, according to another military official, 104 coup plotters were killed. General Hulusi Akar, held by the rebels, was later freed.

File photo of Recep Tayyip Erdoğan, 2016.
Image: Cancillería del Ecuador.

On Friday, the rebels declared martial law claiming to have “taken control of the country” and said Turkish president Recep Tayyip Erdoğan‘s government was responsible for damaging Turkey’s secular tradition. They shut down Istanbul Atatürk Airport and blocked the two bridges over the Bosphorus, with gunfire and, by some reports, jets dropping bombs in Istanbul and Ankara. Social-networking websites were blocked in the country and news channel CNN stopped broadcasting. Tank fire and explosions were reported at the parliament.

Prime Minister Yıldırım declared a no-fly zone over Ankara. Erdoğan was in Marmaris during the coup attempt. Erdoğan after reaching Instanbul on Saturday, said, “Those who betrayed this country will pay for this treachery”((tr)) as he announced he would remain president.

General Zekai Aksakalli told NTV, “Those who are attempting a coup will not succeed. Our people should know that we will overcome this”. Erdoğan supporters were seen carrying the Turkish flag on the streets of Istanbul.

During Erdoğan’s address to citizens, coup supporters were seen surrendering, abandoning military tanks, given citizen opposition to the coup. Eight people fled the country seeking asylum in the Greek city of Alexandroupolis, according to Greek officials.

Officials claimed Fethullah Gülen, who is currently in the United States on an exile, was responsible for the coup; Deutsche Presse-Agentur reported Gülen condemned the attempt.


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June 30, 2012

Turkey strengthens air defence at Syria border for possible retaliation

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Saturday, June 30, 2012

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Turkey has deployed short-range anti-aircraft missile batteries at the Syrian border. The deployment comes amid tensions following the shootdown of a Turkish military jet one week ago by Syrian forces.

Turkish television networks reported that a convoy of twelve military trucks moved towards the Syrian boarder. Late Wednesday, some 30 military vehicles, including heavy armor had moved and dispersed to bases along the 565-mile (900-kilometer) Turkish-Syrian border, said Turkey’s state-run Anadolu news agency.

Turkey has given the revel Free Syria Army (FSA) bases, and set up refugee camps for some 34,000 Syrians. Turkish TV broadcrast an address by Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan on Friday in the eastern city of Erzurum: “We will not hesitate to teach a lesson to those who aim heavy weapons at their own people and at neighboring countries.”



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Turkey strengthens air defence at Syrian border following shootdown

Turkey strengthens air defence at Syrian border following shootdown

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Saturday, June 30, 2012

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Turkey has deployed short-range anti-aircraft missile batteries at the Syrian border. The deployment comes amid tensions following the shootdown of a Turkish military jet one week ago by Syrian forces.

Turkish television networks reported that a convoy of twelve military trucks moved towards the Syrian boarder. Late Wednesday, some 30 military vehicles, including heavy armor had moved and dispersed to bases along the 565-mile (900-kilometer) Turkish-Syrian border, said Turkey’s state-run Anadolu news agency.

Turkey has given the rebel Free Syria Army (FSA) bases, and set up refugee camps for some 34,000 Syrians. Turkish TV broadcast an address by Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan on Friday in the eastern city of Erzurum: “We will not hesitate to teach a lesson to those who aim heavy weapons at their own people and at neighboring countries.”



Related news

EU condemns Syria for shootdown, urges Turkish restraint” — Wikinews, June 25, 2012

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March 12, 2010

Turkey recalls ambassador to Sweden over \”genocide\” vote

Turkey recalls ambassador to Sweden over “genocide” vote

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Friday, March 12, 2010

Turkey has recalled its ambassador to Sweden after the Swedish Parliament voted to describe Turkey’s killings of Armenians in World War I as “genocide”.

The Swedish vote came despite the Swedish government’s opposition to the resolution, as several parliament members crossed party lines in the vote, which passed the resolution by a vote of 131–130, with 88 parliament members absent. The Swedish government called the vote a “mistake,” but added that it will not influence their position on the matter.

The Turkish government released a statement saying, “our people and our government reject this decision based upon major errors and without foundation,” and Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan immediately cancelled a planned visit to Sweden. Despite the reaction, Turkey said that the moves did “not correspond to the close friendship of our two nations,” and they were only recalling their ambassador for consultations.

The resolution is particularly sensitive given that Sweden has long been a strong supporter of Turkey and their bid to join the European Union, and Turkey has been for years maintaining that their actions in World War I against Armenians did not amount to genocide. Despite Turkey’s claims, Armenians have been heavily campaigning for the killings, which they say number up to 1.5 million, to be recognized as genocide, and over twenty countries worldwide have done so.

Swedish Foreign Minister Carl Bildt said that the vote would likely have a significant effect on the fate of negotiations between Turkey and Armenia, which have been attempting to resume normal diplomatic relations. The Turkish ambassador that was recalled said that the vote would have “drastic effects” on the negotiations, and it would have an impact for some time.

The Swedish vote came not long after a similar vote by a US Congressional panel, which also approved a resolution with similar terminology, leading to the removal of Turkey’s ambassador. In that case, the US government has been trying to prevent the resolution from going further, in an attempt to limit the consequences of the vote.



Related news

  • “US Congressional panel claims Turkey committed genocide” — Wikinews, March 5, 2010

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November 6, 2007

Bush pledges support for Turkey after meeting with PM

Bush pledges support for Turkey after meeting with PM

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Tuesday, November 6, 2007

President George W. Bush meets with Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan in the Oval Office on November 5, 2007.

On Monday, the Prime Minister of Turkey, Recep Tayyip Erdoğan paid an official state visit to the United States. During his visit, he met with President George W. Bush in the White House for talks that centered on the Turkey-PKK conflict and the Iraq War.

Turkey is concerned about attacks by the Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) that originate from within the borders of Iraq. There have been cross-border clashes between Turkey and the PKK. Turkey has threatened a major incursion, something the US seeks to avoid, as it could upset the relative calm in northern Iraq. The PKK has been listed as a terrorist organization by a number of countries and organizations. The PKK’s goal has been to create an independent socialist Kurdish state in a territory which it claims as Kurdistan, an area that comprises parts of south-eastern Turkey, north-eastern Iraq, north-eastern Syria and north-western Iran.

After the meeting, Bush said of the PKK that “they are an enemy of Turkey, they are an enemy of Iraq, and they are an enemy of the United States.” He pledged additional intelligence to help Turkey, an offer that was also made by Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice last week, during her Middle East tour.

We talked about the need to have better intelligence-sharing. In order to chase down people who murder people you need good intelligence. And we talked about the need for our military to stay in constant contact. To this end, the Prime Minister and I have set up a tripartite arrangement, for his number two man in the military to stay in touch with our number man and General Petraeus.
 
— George W. Bush

Bush further offered mutual military assistance with both Turkey and Iraq to fight the PKK. “We want to work in a close way to deal with this problem,” he said.

Erdogan mentioned during the post-meeting news conference that the Grand National Assembly of Turkey has already authorized military action in Iraq. He did not, however, say whether such action would be imminent.

There is a lot of difficulty in the region in general. And I believe that it falls to us, it’s a responsibility for us as strategic partners to work to ensure that we overcome these difficulties and solve them. I have also seen that the President and I agree on these points, and I’m very happy to see that.
 
— Recep Tayyip Erdoğan

Neither leader indicated to what level, if any, that direct military cooperation would exist.

Ali Babacan, the Minister of Foreign Affairs for Turkey, was last week not so impressed by Rice’s offers. “We are at the point where words have been exhausted and where there is need for action,” he said on Friday.

“The Bush administration would like to just kick this can down the road,” said Bulent Aliriza, a political observer for the Center for Strategic and International Studies. “The problem is, the can has been kicked down the road to the point where now it can’t be kicked anymore.”



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  • Kurdish militants in Iraq declare cease-fire with Turkey” — Wikinews, June 12, 2007

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October 18, 2007

Turkish Parliament approves military action in Iraq

Turkish Parliament approves military action in Iraq

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Thursday, October 18, 2007

Flag of Turkey.

On Wednesday, Turkey’s Grand National Assembly voted 507-19 to authorize sending troops into northern Iraq to pursue Kurdish rebels. Although the authorization is valid for one year, Turkish officials made clear that it would not necessarily result in military action. Both the United States and Iraq have recently warned Turkey against such an incursion.

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan said that although the motion does not indicate that a military operation is imminent, it is necessary for Turkey to be able to respond to bomb attacks which have been blamed on Kurdistan Workers Party (PKK) rebels in Iraq. Turkey has been asking for help in dealing with the PKK for months, and the Turkish public has grown frustrated with America’s perceived lack of action on the issue.

Map showing Kurd-inhabited region overlapping national borders.

Both the United States and Iraq have recently warned Turkey against an incursion into Iraq. “The Iraqi government calls on the Turkish government to pursue a diplomatic solution and not a military solution to solve the [problem] of terrorist attacks which our dear neighbor Turkey has witnessed from the PKK,” Iraq government spokesperson Ali al-Dabbagh said earlier this week. White House National Security Council spokesman Gordon Johndroe called on Turkey “to continue their discussions with us and the Iraqis and to show restraint from any potentially destabilizing actions.”

Responding to the motion, U.S. President George W. Bush urged Turkey not to carry out an attack, saying “[we are] making it clear to Turkey it is not in their interest to send more troops in… there is a better way to deal with the issue.”

Syrian President Bashar al-Assad defended Turkey’s decision and criticized the U.S. position, saying “It is important to note that the powers that have invaded Iraq are those primarily responsible for the terror activities and attacks because they control the country.” “We certainly support and back the decisions by the Turkish government in combat against terror and terror activities,” he said.

Murat Karayilan, the leader of the armed wing of the PKK, warned Turkey of the consequences of an attack in an interview with The Times. “If the Turkish Army attacks Iraqi Kurdistan we will struggle and resist against this until the end,” he said. Karayilan nevertheless said he hoped that the crisis could be resolved peacefully but continues attacks on Turkish soldiers, killing 12 in an ambush yesterday.

U.S.-Turkish relations have been strained recently after a U.S. House of Representatives resolution passed committee, labeling the World War I era killings of up to 1.5 million Armenians by the Ottoman Empire as “genocide”. Turkey strongly disputes these claims. Majority Leader Nancy Pelosi says the US House of Representatives will vote on the resolution “soon.”

President Bush criticized the resolution at a press conference on Wednesday, saying “One thing Congress should not be doing is sorting out the historical record of the Ottoman Empire.”



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May 2, 2007

AKP calls for early general election in Turkey

AKP calls for early general election in Turkey

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Wednesday, May 2, 2007

Abdullah Gül, deputy Prime Minister and foreign minister of Turkey.
Image: José Cruz/ABr, 2006.

The ruling party in Turkey has asked the Grand National Assembly of Turkey to approve a general election to take place June 24, 2007. The next general election was scheduled for November.

The Justice and Development Party (AKP), which holds 363 of 550 seats in parliament, apparently feels that it will not be able to achieve quorum in the vote on its presidential candidate Abdullah Gül. Analysts reportedly project that AKP would fare well in the elections.

Just yesterday, the Constitutional Court annulled the first round of voting in the presidential election.

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan.
Image: Bertil Videt.

Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdoğan called the court’s decision “a bullet aimed at democracy… It has made it almost impossible for the parliament to elect a president in the future.” He also called for the constitution to be changed so that the president is elected by popular vote, instead of the current method where parliament elects the president. Erdoğan also proposed to change the constitution to allow the president to serve 2 terms of 5 years instead of the current single term of 7 years.

The Turkish pro-secular movement first feared that prime minister Erdoğan would run for president. When the ruling AKP chose Abdullah Gül as their candidate instead, they feared that Gül might have a hidden Islamic agenda and be a threat to the separation between religion and state in Turkey. But AKP denies such agenda, and Gül has promised to adhere to secularist principles if he would become president. Gül’s wife has in the past fiercely defended her right to wear the Islamic headscarf.

Meanwhile, the United States has joined the European Union in asking the Turkish Armed Forces to stay out of the process. The military sees itself as the guardian of secular government in Turkey and has toppled the government four times since 1960.

The first rally on April 14 in Ankara.
Image: Selahattin Sönmez.

Two pro-secular rallies with several hundred thousand demonstrators took place in April, one in Ankara and the other in Istanbul. National symbols were strongly present during these protests, and people were chanting “Turkey is secular and will remain secular” and “We don’t want an imam as president!”.

Related news

  • “Turkey’s Constitutional Court invalidates first round in presidential elections” — Wikinews, May 1, 2007
  • “Protests in Turkey over Presidential candidate” — Wikinews, April 30, 2007
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  • “Pro-secular Turks rally against Erdogan’s possible presidential candidacy” — Wikinews, April 15, 2007

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