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May 14, 2012

Mexico authorities find over four dozen corpses

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Monday, May 14, 2012

Mexico
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Location of Mexico

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President Felipe Calderón initiated the Mexican Drug War in 2006.

Authorities in Mexico have discovered 49 headless and dismembered dead bodies abandoned on the side of a road at the entryway to San Juan, a town located within Cadereyta Jiménez municipality. The bodies, six female and the other 43 male, were discovered by police at approximately 0400 CDT (0900 UTC) yesterday.

Speaking on behalf for security in the state of Nuevo León, Jorge Domene said, “We know from the characteristics that this is the result of violence between criminal gangs,” clarifying that this was not “an attack on the civilian population”. A spray-painted notice that read “100% Zeta,” referring to the Los Zetas drug cartel, was sighted on an archway where the incident occurred and is a sign that killings were linked to a dispute between drug cartels. Domene said the sign is typically a method Los Zetas uses when it takes responsibility.

Adrian de la Garza, a state prosecutor, has commented on the possibility of the individuals being killed as long ago as Friday and in a different location from where the bodies were discovered. He said he is still considering the possibility of those killed being migrants from Central America who intended to travel to the United States.

Both Domene and de la Garza said identification of the bodies will be difficult because the bodies were found headless and with their extremities removed. The corpses have been referred to the city of Monterrey for DNA profiling.

According to BBC News Online, Los Zetas is in a conflict with the Sinaloa Cartel and Gulf Cartel over drug transportation paths leading towards the United States, with all cartels attempting to gain control of the road paths. The road on which the discovery was made lies between Monterrey in the state of Nuevo León and the city of Reynosa, located close to the Mexico–United States border, in the state of Tamaulipas. National Autonomous University of Mexico security expert Raul Benitez Manaut described the conflict between the cartels as “the most definitive of all the cartel wars.”

On Wednesday, a discovery of a similar nature occurred when 18 beheaded and mutilated corpses were discovered within two deserted vehicles near the city of Guadalajara. In a separate incident on May 4, 23 corpses were found in the city of Nuevo Laredo, 14 of which were without heads. Over 47,500 fatalities have been recorded since the commencement of the Mexican Drug War in December 2006.

Map of Nuevo León within Mexico Image: Yavidaxiu.

Map of Nuevo León within Mexico
Image: Yavidaxiu.

Map of Tamaulipas within Mexico Image: Yavidaxiu.

Map of Tamaulipas within Mexico
Image: Yavidaxiu.

Map of Mexico highlighting the city of Monterrey Image: Mixcoatl.

Map of Mexico highlighting the city of Monterrey
Image: Mixcoatl.

Map of Mexico highlighting the city of Reynosa Image: Mixcoatl.

Map of Mexico highlighting the city of Reynosa
Image: Mixcoatl.



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March 21, 2012

Mexico gunmen kill twelve police

Mexico gunmen kill twelve police – Wikinews, the free news source

Mexico gunmen kill twelve police

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Wednesday, March 21, 2012

Mexico
Other stories from Mexico
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Location of Mexico

A map showing the location of Mexico

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Mexico, see the Mexico Portal
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Twelve police officers were killed as the result of an ambush by gunmen in Guerrero, a state in the south of Mexico, authorities confirmed yesterday. The police officers were examining the area to find the bodies of ten individuals, whose separated heads have previously been discovered, at the time of the attack.

Map of Mexico with Guerrero highlighted in black.
Image: Yavidaxiu.

According to Arturo Martinez, speaking on behalf of the state police force of Guerrero, six of the policemen killed in the attack were local, while the other six were working for the state. In the attack, which occurred in the city of Teloloapan Sunday, an additional nine police experienced injuries for which they were hospitalised, BBC News Online reported. Eleven officers involved in the incident experienced wounds, according to The Associated Press.

Martinez explained that the officers, who were occupying six police vehicles between them, were searching for the bodies of three females and seven males after their separated heads were abandoned and discovered at a slaughterhouse in Teloloapan. Amongst the severed heads, threats directed at La Familia Michoacana, a drug-related business located in neighbouring state Michoacán, were discovered.

Guerrero is a state known for containing plantations of opium poppies and cannabis, as well as violence related to drug cartels. In excess of 47,000 deaths have been recorded across the whole of Mexico since current President Felipe Calderón commenced the Drug ‘War’ in December 2006.

Pope Benedict XVI has a visit to the country scheduled for Friday. According to BBC News Online, comment about violence relating to drug businesses in Mexico is anticipated from him.



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August 4, 2011

Earl Anthony Wayne confirmed as U.S ambassador to Mexico

Earl Anthony Wayne confirmed as U.S ambassador to Mexico

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Thursday, August 4, 2011

Mexico
Other stories from Mexico
  • 31 January 2015: Gas explosion flattens Mexico City maternity hospital
  • 27 June 2014: Germany, Netherlands, Canada and USA into Women’s Wheelchair Basketball Championships semi-finals
  • 25 June 2014: Japanese wheelchair basketball player Mari Amimoto leads in scoring at world championships
  • 28 February 2014: Researcher discovers 39 new cockroach species, increasing genus Arenivaga fivefold
  • 9 October 2013: Wikinews interviews President of the International Brotherhood of Magicians
…More articles here
Location of Mexico

A map showing the location of Mexico

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Mexico, see the Mexico Portal
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Wayne is the former U.S ambassador to Argentina

The United States Senate has unanimously confirmed Earl Anthony Wayne as the new U.S ambassador to Mexico. He replaces Carlos Pascual, who resigned in March following a dispute with Mexican President Felipe Calderón.

Wayne’s nomination had been pending since June, and in late July the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee approved the nomination. Before the confirmation he said “One of my principal objectives…will be to work with my Mexican and U.S. colleagues to accelerate the implementation of the activities to assure that we are achieving our Mérida objectives.”

Wayne has previously served as the U.S ambassador to Argentina and as the deputy ambassador to Afghanistan.

Speaking about the Senate’s choice of Wayne as a candidate for the ambassador’s role, Eric Olson, a senior associate at the Mexico Institute of the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars said “They didn’t want a controversial candidate. If you choose someone who is more of a political appointee than a career foreign service officer it can get caught up in the politics of the situation. [With Wayne] you’re not picking someone out of the blue or somebody that the committee is not familiar with.”



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August 8, 2009

Drug cartel and police shootouts erupt in Mexico

Drug cartel and police shootouts erupt in Mexico

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Saturday, August 8, 2009

R-15 semi-automatic rifles similar to the ones used in the shootouts

Mexico
Other stories from Mexico
  • 31 January 2015: Gas explosion flattens Mexico City maternity hospital
  • 27 June 2014: Germany, Netherlands, Canada and USA into Women’s Wheelchair Basketball Championships semi-finals
  • 25 June 2014: Japanese wheelchair basketball player Mari Amimoto leads in scoring at world championships
  • 28 February 2014: Researcher discovers 39 new cockroach species, increasing genus Arenivaga fivefold
  • 9 October 2013: Wikinews interviews President of the International Brotherhood of Magicians
…More articles here
Location of Mexico

A map showing the location of Mexico

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Mexico, see the Mexico Portal
Flag of Mexico.svg

On Thursday, several shootouts occurred in Mexico leaving nine cartel suspects dead, killing seven police officers, and injuring close to 30 others.

Following the several gun battles, police seized 1.2 million pesos (more than US$92,000), cocaine, assault rifles, police uniforms, bullet proof vests, handcuffs, hand grenades, and a variety of other military weapons.

Federal agents went missing and a search initiated by the Hidalgo state police found them alive near an auto racetrack in the Mineral de la Reforma municipality. Shortly after their discovery a shootout took place. Acting on a tip, police pulled over four trucks near Pachuca which resulted in a firefight, lasting 20 minutes, after which cartel suspects fled the scene. Over a dozen were left dead and 22 injured including several police agents in Pachuca.

The cities of Silao, La Calera and Irapuato in the state of Guanajuato suffered both grenade and artillery shootouts which took the life of one police officer, killed an innocent bystander, and critically injured another 18. The police station in Silao was attacked by hand grenades, AK-47 assault rifles and R-15 semi-automatic rifles; the attacks killed two people and placed ten in the hospital. Nine cartel suspects were killed in the city of La Calera. Another attack Thursday night killed a police investigator in the city of Ciudad Juárez in the state of Chihuahua.

Mexican federal police recently arrested top leaders of the La Familia Michoacana drug cartel, making these attacks likely retaliation. A similar modus operandi was seen where simultaneous shootouts across Mexico occurred targeting police stations in July.

The President of Mexico Felipe Calderón, along with US President, Barack Obama, have initiated a crack down on drug gangs. The Mexican Drug War which began in December 2006 has resulted in an estimated 10,000 fatalities, of which about 10% have been police officials.



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April 30, 2009

Mexico on path to decriminalize personal possession of drugs

Mexico on path to decriminalize personal possession of drugs

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Thursday, April 30, 2009

Mexico
Other stories from Mexico
…More articles here
Location of Mexico

A map showing the location of Mexico

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Mexico, see the Mexico Portal
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On Tuesday, April 28, the Senate of Mexico approved a bill that would decriminalize the possession of small quantities of psychoactive drugs for personal use, including marijuana and cocaine. The proposed law has the support of President Felipe Calderón. It awaits approval by the Chamber of Deputies, the lower house of Mexico’s legislature.

The tribune of the Mexican Senate.
Image: Senado de la República (Mexican Senate).

The bill, which passed with 87 votes and 10 abstentions, would make it legal to carry quantities up to 5 grams of marijuana, 500 milligrams of cocaine, 50 milligrams of heroin, or 40 milligrams of methamphetamines for personal use. Those found with greater quantities or convicted of the intent to distribute or sell any quantity of the specified drugs face a sentence of 5–15 years of prison.

The Mexican Congress passed a similar bill in 2006, but it was vetoed by then-president Vicente Fox under pressure from the administration of former United States president George W. Bush.

The 2009 bill would authorize local authorities to investigate drug trafficking. Previously, the classification of drug trafficking as a federal offense prevented local authorities from enforcing drug laws and made it difficult to convict drug dealers: Mexico’s federal courts are overwhelmed by bigger cases.

The bill would also offer voluntary treatment to drug addicts. Those detained three times for drug possession would be sent to a rehabilitation center for mandatory treatment.



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Mexico on path to decriminalize personal possession of drugs

Filed under: Crime and law,Drugs,Felipe Calderón,Mexico,North America — admin @ 5:00 am

Thursday, April 30, 2009

Other stories from Mexico
…More articles here
Location of Mexico

A map showing the location of Mexico

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Mexico, see the Mexico Portal

On Thursday, April 28, the Senate of Mexico approved a bill that would decriminalize the possession of small quantities of psychoactive drugs for personal use, including marijuana and cocaine. The proposed law has the support of President Felipe Calderón. It awaits approval by the Chamber of Deputies, the lower house of Mexico’s legislature.

The bill, which passed with 87 votes and 10 abstentions, would make it legal to carry quantities up to 5 grams of marijuana, 500 milligrams of cocaine, 50 milligrams of heroin or 40 milligrams of methamphetamines for personal use. Those found with greater quantities or convicted of the intent to distribute or sell any quantity of the specified drugs face a sentence of 5-15 years of prison.

The Mexican Congress passed a similar bill in 2006, but it was vetoed by then president Vicente Fox under pressure from the administration of former United States president George W. Bush.

The 2009 bill would authorize local authorities to investigate drug trafficking. Previously, the classification of drug trafficking as a federal offense prevented local authorities from enforcing drug laws and made it difficult to convict drug dealers: Mexico’s federal courts are overwhelmed by bigger cases.

The bill would also offer voluntary treatment to drug addicts. Those detained three times for drug possession would be sent to a rehabilitation center for mandatory treatment.


Sources

  • José Contreras “Senado aprueba portar droga para autoconsumo”. La Crónica de Hoy, April 29, 2009 ((Spanish))
  • “México despenaliza la posesión de drogas para uso personal”. Tribuna Latina, April 29, 2009 ((Spanish))
  • Miguel Angel Gutierrez “Mexico Senate OKs bill to legalize drug possesion”. Reuters, April 28, 2009
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

March 27, 2009

US secretary of state Hillary Clinton says America helps fuel illegal drug trade

US secretary of state Hillary Clinton says America helps fuel illegal drug trade

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Friday, March 27, 2009

Clinton at the grand opening of the Erie Canal Harbor in Buffalo, New York, July 2008.
Image: Jason Safoutin.

United States secretary of state, Hillary Clinton stated in an interview on Mexican radio that Americans are helping to fuel the illegal drug trade between the U.S. and Mexico. Clinton was on a two day tour of the nation.

“Our insatiable demand for illegal drugs fuels the drug trade. Our inability to prevent weapons from being illegally smuggled across the border to arm these criminals causes the death of police officers, soldiers and civilians. I feel very strongly we have a co-responsibility,” said Clinton.

Clinton also gave thanks to and praised the effort Mexico was putting forth to stop the flow of drugs over the border. “Clearly, what we have been doing has not worked and it is unfair for our incapacity…to be creating a situation where people are holding the Mexican government and people responsible.”

Mexico’s president, Felipe Calderón responded by saying that “binational cooperation in this area should be strengthened.” Mexico has used troops in some towns in an attempt to regain control of the cities, which has resulted in many gun battles with drug cartel members and Mexican troops. Ongoing trucking disputes between the U.S. and Mexico have also contributed to an already tense situation.

Increased drug related violence in towns and cities on the Mexico – United States border has claimed more than 6,000 lives since 2008.



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November 7, 2008

World leaders react to Obama’s victory

Friday, November 7, 2008

2008 United States Presidential Election
2008 US Presidential Election stories

In the wake of Barack Obama being elected the next President of the United States, many world leaders have contacted the president-elect directly. Others have issued statements.

The President of Russia, Dmitry Medvedev sent a message in a telegram which read “I hope for a constructive dialogue with you, based on trust and consideration of each other’s interests.”

Obama became a US senator in 2005

United Kingdom Prime Minister Gordon Brown reportedly phoned Obama. The two talked about “global and bilateral issues,” according to a Downing Street statement.

Nicolas Sarkozy, the President of France, spoke with Obama for 30 minutes. Sarkozy’s office said the conversation was “extremely warm” and that the two agree to meet in the “quite near future.”

Canada’s Stephen Harper also spoke with Obama, according to official reports. Harper’s office said they spoke of the upcoming international financial summit on November 15, though Obama will not be attending. An email to the press from Harper’s office said: “In a warm exchange, the two leaders emphasized that there could be no closer friends and allies and vowed to maintain and further build upon this strong relationship.”

Mexico’s President Felipe Calderón spoke with Obama about the War on Drugs. According to a statement by Calderón’s office, Obama said he was “conscious of the difficulty of the battle” and promised “decisive” support from the United States.

The Prime Minister of Australia, Kevin Rudd, also spoke with Obama via telephone. Speaking at Kirribilli House, Rudd said: “The president-elect and I spoke about the strength of the Australia-United States relationship, and our commitment to take that relationship to even greater strengths into the future.”

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad issued a statement. “The great Iranian nation welcomes real, fundamental and fair changes in America’s behaviour and policies, particularly in the Middle East region,” it read.

Hugo Chávez, the president of Venezuela said in a statement: “The historical election of an Afro-American to lead the most powerful country in the world is a sign that the changing times which originated in South America could be knocking the doors of United States.”

Silvio Berlusconi, Italy’s Prime Minister, congratulated Obama, describing him as “young, handsome and tanned” (translated). The statement prompted reactions from the opposition and from the international press as it was perceived as a racist remark. Berlusconi replied to criticism restating that his words were meant as a “compliment.”


Sources

  • Nicky Trup “Rudd and Obama reaffirm close ties in phone conversation”. The Australian, November 7, 2008
  • Nabi Abdullaev “Obama Gets Telegram, No Spot in Speech”. The Moscow Times, November 6, 2008
  • Andrew Porter “Gordon Brown and Barack Obama share first telephone conversation since election”. The Daily Telegraph, November 6, 2008
  • Nedra Pickler “Obama receives congratulations from world leaders”. Associated Press, November 6, 2008
  • “Harper, Obama have ‘warm exchange’: PMO”. CTV Television Network, November 6, 2008
  • “Ahmadinejad congratulates Obama”. Al Jazeera, November 6, 2008
  • Patrick Goodenough “Chavez, Allies Applaud Obama Victory”. Cybercast News Service, November 6, 2008
  • Marco Bracconi “Berlusconi, prima gaffe su Obama “E’ giovane, bello e abbronzato””. La Repubblica, November 6, 2008 ((Italian))
  • Lee Glendinning “Obama is young, handsome and tanned, says Silvio Berlusconi”. guardian.co.uk, November 6 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

World leaders react to Obama\’s victory

World leaders react to Obama’s victory – Wikinews, the free news source

World leaders react to Obama’s victory

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, November 7, 2008

2008 United States Presidential Election
Wikinews Election 2008.svg
2008 U.S. Presidential Election stories

In the wake of Barack Obama being elected the next President of the United States, many world leaders have contacted the president-elect directly. Others have issued statements.

The President of Russia, Dmitry Medvedev, sent a message in a telegram which read: “I hope for a constructive dialogue with you, based on trust and consideration of each other’s interests.”

Obama became a US senator in 2005

United Kingdom Prime Minister Gordon Brown reportedly phoned Obama. The two talked about “global and bilateral issues,” according to a Downing Street statement.

Nicolas Sarkozy, the President of France, spoke with Obama for 30 minutes. Sarkozy’s office said the conversation was “extremely warm” and that the two agree to meet in the “quite near future.”

Canada’s Stephen Harper also spoke with Obama, according to official reports. Harper’s office said they spoke of the upcoming international financial summit on November 15, though Obama will not be attending. An email to the press from Harper’s office said: “In a warm exchange, the two leaders emphasized that there could be no closer friends and allies and vowed to maintain and further build upon this strong relationship.”

Mexico’s President Felipe Calderón spoke with Obama about the War on Drugs. According to a statement by Calderón’s office, Obama said he was “conscious of the difficulty of the battle” and promised “decisive” support from the United States.

The Prime Minister of Australia, Kevin Rudd, also spoke with Obama via telephone. Speaking at Kirribilli House, Rudd said: “The president-elect and I spoke about the strength of the Australia-United States relationship, and our commitment to take that relationship to even greater strengths into the future.”

Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad issued a statement. “The great Iranian nation welcomes real, fundamental and fair changes in America’s behaviour and policies, particularly in the Middle East region,” it read.

Hugo Chávez, the President of Venezuela, said in a statement: “The historical election of an Afro-American to lead the most powerful country in the world is a sign that the changing times which originated in South America could be knocking the doors of United States.”

Silvio Berlusconi, Italy’s Prime Minister, congratulated Obama, describing him as “young, handsome and tanned” (translated). The statement prompted reactions from the opposition and from the international press as it was perceived as a racist remark. Berlusconi replied to criticism restating that his words were meant as a “compliment.”



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November 3, 2007

Floods in Tabasco, Mexico impact over a million people

Floods in Tabasco, Mexico impact over a million people

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Saturday, November 3, 2007

Location of Tabasco within Mexico.

Floods have affected over a million people in the Mexican State of Tabasco, mainly in the capital of the state, Villahermosa. This has escalated in the last days into becoming the state’s worst catastrophe in its history.

Eighty percent of the state’s territory is underwater due to the Grijalva river flooding and heavy rains, which are expected to continue over the next few days.

Mexican president Felipe Calderón defined the situation as critical and urged all Mexicans to give their support.

Helicopters and boats are being used to move people from rooftops and hospital patients are being flown to neighbouring states.

Industry has also been affected as mentioned by Tabasco governor Andres Granier, who said that 100% of the tabasco pepper crops had been lost.

He also compared the damage caused by Hurricane Katrina on the US Gulf Coast two years ago, saying that New Orleans was “small compared to this”.



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