Wiki Actu en

November 21, 2012

Philippines to host four-country meeting about South China Sea disputes

Philippines to host four-country meeting about South China Sea disputes

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

Philippines
Other stories from the Philippines
…More articles here
Location of the Philippines

A map showing the location of the Philippines

To write, edit, start or view other articles on the Philippines, see the Philippines Portal
Flag of the Philippines.svg

South China Sea maritime claims, June 2011.
Image: Voice of America.

The Philippines announced today it will host a meeting on December 12 in Manila regarding territorial disputes in the South China Sea. The meeting of deputy foreign ministers is to be attended by Brunei, Malaysia, Vietnam, and the host country.

The meeting is a new step in attempts to solve disputes between these countries and China. China has previously stated it wishes to solve the disputes bilaterally instead of multilaterally. It comes after the failure of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) to produce a consensus on how to solve the disputes during a summit this month. Cambodia, an ally of China, is the current chair of ASEAN.

Current disputes in the South China Sea include areas such as the Spratly Islands and the Scarborough Shoal. China and Taiwan each claim nearly the whole sea while the countries attending the meeting claim parts of it.

The area contains abundant fishing grounds and important shipping lanes. Large fossil fuel deposits are believed located in the area.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

President Obama visits Myanmar

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

Myanmar
Other stories from Myanmar
  • 2 April 2012: Aung San Suu Kyi claims a seat in the Parliamentary elections in Myanmar
  • 30 March 2012: Report indicates continued severe weather problems still looming
  • 9 March 2012: Michelle Obama, Hillary Clinton present 2012 International Women of Courage Awards
  • 19 January 2012: Myanmar’s pro-democracy leader Suu Kyi to contest in by-election
  • 13 January 2012: Observing the 2012 Human Trafficking Awareness Day in the US, and wider world
…More articles here
Location of Myanmar

A map showing the location of Myanmar

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Myanmar, see the Myanmar Portal
Flag of Myanmar.svg

Obama meets with Thein Sein
Image: Official White House Photo by Pete Souza.

United States President Barack Obama Monday became the first US President to visit the Asian country of Myanmar.

Locals left their jobs to watch President Obama’s motorcade drive down the streets of Yangon. In addition to speaking at the University of Yangon, he also spoke with the president of Myanmar, U Thein Sein; and opposition leader Daw Aung San Suu Kyi.

President Thein Sein told President Obama that their countries were in a “progressing” relationship. President Obama told Suu Kyi, an activist under the former regime who became a member of parliament in the new one, that her example “has been inspiration to people all around the world, including myself. Clearly you will be playing a key role in your country’s future for many years to come as Burma seeks the freedom and the prosperity and the dignity that not only the people of this country deserve but people all around the world deserve.”

When he spoke at the University of Yangon, Obama emphasized the former connections between the two countries. He also emphasized America’s democratic system and explained that Myanmar should follow America’s lead. “You need to reach for a future where the law is stronger than any single leader, because it’s accountable to the people”, he said.

Obama speaks at University of Yangon
Image: Official White House Photo by Pete Souza.

Although many residents here are excited about the visit as proof of new democracy, others are more skeptical of such change. Thein Sein was a member of the former military government. Aung San Suu Kyi was only released two years ago from house-arrest that lasted nearly two decades under that government. There is speculation that there are still hundreds of political prisoners under the custody of the government. Violence is an issue in the Kachin State; and Associated Press reports over 110,000 refugees in Rakhine State. Major cities like Yangon seem almost ahead of themselves in capital, with a lack of hotel and office space; while the rural areas are still very primitive.

Zaw Nay Aung, an exile living in Great Britain and director of the Burma Independence Advocates research group, criticized the president’s visit on several counts. He called Thein Sein an ex-general who still leads the country despite their new government. “The ruling elites have been waiting for this moment since they came into power nearly two years ago. The U.S. approval of the country’s reform process has been one of the core political objectives that the regime has tried to secure since transitioning into power”, he said. He also criticized President Obama, calling it “a disgrace for the U.S. president to make such a historic trip to Burma while hundreds of political prisoners still remain in jails”.

Eyes are also on China, which neighbors Myanmar. The two countries had similar policies and were friends. Now, with the President’s visit; the US could be appearing to be “courting” Myanmar. This will especially be an issue in 2015, when Myanmar will be having an election.

The visit was overshadowed by conflict between Israel and Palestine in the Middle East. Myanmar is the second country the president visited in a three-country, four-day tour of the Middle East. Prior to his trip to Myanmar; the president and secretary of state were in Thailand, and afterwards they went to Cambodia, where human rights are expected to be a major issue.


Sources

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

US President Barack Obama visits Myanmar

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

Myanmar
Other stories from Myanmar
  • 2 April 2012: Aung San Suu Kyi claims a seat in the Parliamentary elections in Myanmar
  • 30 March 2012: Report indicates continued severe weather problems still looming
  • 9 March 2012: Michelle Obama, Hillary Clinton present 2012 International Women of Courage Awards
  • 19 January 2012: Myanmar’s pro-democracy leader Suu Kyi to contest in by-election
  • 13 January 2012: Observing the 2012 Human Trafficking Awareness Day in the US, and wider world
…More articles here
Location of Myanmar

A map showing the location of Myanmar

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Myanmar, see the Myanmar Portal
Flag of Myanmar.svg

Obama meets with Thein Sein
Image: Official White House Photo by Pete Souza.

United States President Barack Obama Monday became the first US President to visit the Asian country of Myanmar.

Locals left their jobs to watch President Obama’s motorcade drive down the streets of Yangon. In addition to speaking at the University of Yangon, he also spoke with the president of Myanmar, U Thein Sein; and opposition leader Daw Aung San Suu Kyi.

President Thein Sein told President Obama that their countries were in a “progressing” relationship. President Obama told Suu Kyi, an activist under the former regime who became a member of parliament in the new one, that her example “has been inspiration to people all around the world, including myself. Clearly you will be playing a key role in your country’s future for many years to come as Burma seeks the freedom and the prosperity and the dignity that not only the people of this country deserve but people all around the world deserve.”

When he spoke at the University of Yangon, Obama emphasized the former connections between the two countries. He also emphasized America’s democratic system and explained that Myanmar should follow America’s lead. “You need to reach for a future where the law is stronger than any single leader, because it’s accountable to the people”, he said.

Obama speaks at University of Yangon
Image: Official White House Photo by Pete Souza.

Although many residents here are excited about the visit as proof of new democracy, others are more skeptical of such change. Thein Sein was a member of the former military government. Aung San Suu Kyi was only released two years ago from house-arrest that lasted nearly two decades under that government. There is speculation that there are still hundreds of political prisoners under the custody of the government. Violence is an issue in the Kachin State; and Associated Press reports over 110,000 refugees in Rakhine State. Major cities like Yangon seem almost ahead of themselves in capital, with a lack of hotel and office space; while the rural areas are still very primitive.

Zaw Nay Aung, an exile living in Great Britain and director of the Burma Independence Advocates research group, criticized the president’s visit on several counts. He called Thein Sein an ex-general who still leads the country despite their new government. “The ruling elites have been waiting for this moment since they came into power nearly two years ago. The U.S. approval of the country’s reform process has been one of the core political objectives that the regime has tried to secure since transitioning into power”, he said. He also criticized President Obama, calling it “a disgrace for the U.S. president to make such a historic trip to Burma while hundreds of political prisoners still remain in jails”.

Eyes are also on China, which neighbors Myanmar. The two countries had similar policies and were friends. Now, with the President’s visit; the US could be appearing to be “courting” Myanmar. This will especially be an issue in 2015, when Myanmar will be having an election.

The visit was overshadowed by conflict between Israel and Palestine in the Middle East. Myanmar is the second country the president visited in a three-country, four-day tour of the Middle East. Prior to his trip to Myanmar; the president and secretary of state were in Thailand, and afterwards they went to Cambodia, where human rights are expected to be a major issue.


Sources

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Philippines to host a four-country meeting about the South China Sea disputes

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, November 21, 2012

Philippines
Other stories from the Philippines
…More articles here
Location of the Philippines

A map showing the location of the Philippines

To write, edit, start or view other articles on the Philippines, see the Philippines Portal
Flag of the Philippines.svg

South China Sea maritime claims

On Wednesday, the Philippines announced it will host a meeting on December 12 in Manila regarding territorial disputes in the South China Sea. The meeting is to be attended by the foreign ministers of Brunei, Malaysia, and Vietnam.

The meeting is a new step in attempts to solve the disputes between these countries and with China. China has previously stated it wishes to solve the disputes bilaterally instead of multilaterally. It comes after the failure of the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) to come up with a consensus on how to solve the disputes. Cambodia, a well-known ally of China and the current chair of ASEAN, refused to take-up the disputes during the recent summit in November.

Current disputes in the South China Sea are likely to be discussed in the meeting. These include areas such as the Spratly Islands, the Paracel Islands, the Pratas Islands, the Scarborough Shoal, and Macclesfield Bank. China and Taiwan claims the whole sea while the countries attending the meeting claim parts of it.

The area is abundant in fish and marine life and is also an important shipping lane. Large fossil fuel reserves, such as petroleum and natural gas, are believed to be located in the area.



Sources

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

September 24, 2010

New Zealand man goes on trial in Cambodia over sex with underage girls

New Zealand man goes on trial in Cambodia over sex with underage girls

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, September 24, 2010

Cambodia
Other stories from Cambodia
…More articles here
Location of Cambodia

A map showing the location of Cambodia

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Cambodia, see the Cambodia Portal
Flag of Cambodia.svg

Lines was arrested in the province of Preah Sihanouk

A man from New Zealand has gone on trial in Cambodia over allegedly having sex with two young girls. 53-year-old Michael John Lines was arrested at a hotel in the province of Preah Sihanouk in March. Lines holds dual citizenship from New Zealand and Australia.

The trial took place behind closed doors and lasted a day. Lines was tried on charges of procuring an underage child for sex. Judge Duch Kimsan said he will announce his decision in the near future.

In the past few years Cambodian police and the courts have begun to crack down on foreigners who travel to Cambodia seeking sex with young girls from poor areas.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

November 10, 2009

Ousted Thai PM arrives in Cambodia to take up government post

Ousted Thai PM arrives in Cambodia to take up government post

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Tuesday, November 10, 2009

Cambodia
Other stories from Cambodia
…More articles here
Location of Cambodia

A map showing the location of Cambodia

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Cambodia, see the Cambodia Portal
Flag of Cambodia.svg

Thaksin Shinawatra
Image: Russian Presidential Press and Information Office.

Former Thai Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra arrived today in Cambodia where he will take up a post as the government’s economic advisor. The appointment has caused a diplomatic incident between the two countries, as Shinawatra was condemned to two years in jail in absentia for corruption.

Tension is already mounting, with the Thai government expressing both anger and embarrassment over the appointment. They have withdrawn their ambassador and have decided to cancel plans with the Cambodian government for trade and oil exploration. This comes amidst disputes over the Preah Vihear temple complex which spans both countries. Thailand has further threatened to close borders with its neighbour.

Thaksin will address 300 Cambodian economics experts on Thursday in Phnom Penh and is expected to remain “two or three days” according to Cambodian cabinet spokesman Phay Siphan. “It is an honour for Cambodia’s economic sector and we hope that Cambodians nationwide welcome him warmly,” he announced.

Cambodian information minister Khieu Kanharith also welcomed Thaksin. “We are looking forward to learning from Thaksin’s great economic experience and we are convinced that his experience will contribute to our country’s economic development,” he said.

A coup in 2006 ousted Thaksin after members of parliament defected during military rule. Since then he has been in exile, mostly living in Dubai. He is still influential in Thailand, using protests by the Red Shirts, and the Thai government fears that Thaksin will use Cambodia as base to campaign.

However, Thaksin published a letter on his website on Monday indicating that he did not intend to “go to Cambodia to help Cambodia fight with Thailand […] As I travel to Cambodia to discuss poverty and the world economic situation, I will try to preserve Thai interests with our friends in Phnom Penh, despite the Thai government still hounding me wherever I go,” he stated.

Cambodia has made it clear that they will not extradite Thaksin. Cambodian foreign ministry spokesman Koy Kuong said that regarding the jail sentence they are “not concerned about these issues […] We already clarified this case because he is a political victim.”



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

October 11, 2009

17 killed after Cambodian ferry capsizes

Filed under: Archived,Asia,Cambodia,Disasters and accidents,Transport — admin @ 5:00 am

Sunday, October 11, 2009

At least seventeen people were killed on Sunday after a river ferry in Cambodia capsized in a tributary of the Mekong river.

The ferry, with 30 people onboard, was travelling to a ceremony at a Buddhist temple. The incident occurred overnight in the Kratie province, about 160 kilometres northeast of Cambodia’s capital Phnom Penh.

Reports suggest that the boat capsized due to being overloaded with passengers. “There was no storm or heavy rain when the boat sank. The accident happened because it was overloaded with passengers,” said police Major Leng Sarum.

Two boys under the age of five and fourteen women were among the casualties, according to Kratie’s governor Kham Phoeun.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

October 16, 2008

Thai-Cambodian generals in talks after border clash kills two

Thai-Cambodian generals in talks after border clash kills two

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, October 16, 2008

Preah Vihear Temple (Kao Phra Viharn)
Image: Henry Flower.

Today saw high-level talks between Thai and Cambodian military leaders following a border skirmish yesterday which left two Cambodian soldiers dead, injuries on both sides, and ten Thai troops captured. Several hours of talks have led to an agreement for joint military patrols along the disputed border.

Thailand
Other stories from Thailand
  • 21 May 2015: Yingluck Shinawatra, former Thai prime minster, begins her trial in Bangkok over corruption allegations
  • 18 May 2015: Over 900 asylum seekers rescued off Indonesian coast
  • 5 June 2014: ‘Hunger Games’ salute used to protest coup d’état in Thailand
  • 3 March 2014: Thai school bus crash kills fifteen
  • 9 December 2013: Thai Prime Minister dissolves parliament and calls elections
…More articles here
Location of Thailand

A map showing the location of Thailand

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Thailand, see the Thailand Portal
Flag of Thailand.svg

Wednesday’s exchange of fire in the disputed border region surrounding Preah Vihear Temple is the latest in a dispute over an area of scrubland which both Cambodia and Thailand claim. While each side claims the other initiated the clash, government officials in both capitals have sought to downplay the seriousness of the incident and stress that a negotiated settlement is the only reasonable solution. The disputed territory is a little under five square kilometres and was, in 1962, awarded to Cambodia by the International Court of Justice. The decision caused resentment in Thailand which continues to this day.

Downplaying the incident, Cambodian Foreign Minister Hor Namhong spoke of the negotiations in positive terms, stressing the skirmish was, “an incident between soldiers and not an invasion by Thailand”. Thai Prime Minister, Somchai Wongsawat stressed the need for the dispute over territory to be resolved peacefully.

According to officials, apart from the two Cambodian soldiers who died in the skirmish, an additional two Khmer troops and five Thais were injured. Thailand has denied the claim by Cambodia that ten soldiers were captured in the disputed territory. On the other side of the border, Cambodian officials have said the captives will be returned upon request.

Location of Preah Vihear Temple.
Image: Matthew Edwards from CIA World factbook maps.

The dispute over the contested territory flared up in June; UNESCO awarded the Hindu Preah Vihear Temple the status of World Heritage Site as a Cambodian property, bringing the issue back into the spotlight. The 900-year-old temple sits at the centre of a military build-up on both sides of the border and despite an agreed pull-back in August the situation deteriorated when Cambodia asserted that Thai troops had returned to the entrenched positions that now see around 1,000 soldiers from both sides facing each other. The return of Thai military forces saw the Cambodian Prime Minister, Hun Sen threaten to turn the area into a “death zone”.

United Nations Secretary General, Ban Ki-moon spoke yesterday on the incident, expressing grave concern over the escalation of the conflict and loss of life. A spokesperson for the Secretary-General said, “He calls on both parties to exercise utmost restraint and urges them to expedite bilateral talks so that their differences can be resolved peacefully”. This is not the first time Ban Ki-moon has spoken on the issue; previously calls for restraint have been issued as the military build-up in the area has continued.

The ongoing dispute and yesterday’s escalation have seen moves to take civilians out of harm’s way. The government in Bangkok urged Thai citizens in Cambodia to leave the country if they were not there on urgent business. Over 400 returned on a Thai Airways flight following the call to evacuate Thai nationals. With a 2003 dispute and unrest having seen Thailand’s embassy in Phnom Penh torched, Cambodian authorities deployed riot police around the building yesterday in case the dispute led to violence. In the disputed region, thousands of Cambodians have left due to the build-up of forces on both sides of the border and increased tensions.

HAVE YOUR SAY
Wikinews commentary.svg
Should UNESCO take total control over all World Heritage Sites and their surroundings to avoid conflicts like this?
Add or view comments

The current flare-up along the border is the second incident this month; on October 3 there was a clash where Thailand claims Cambodian forces crossed the border and fired on Thai rangers causing two injuries. That incident saw both sides exchange protest letters. Thailand claimed that rangers patrolling on their side of the border encountered Cambodian troops and demanded they return across the border. The alleged response was apparently orders from superiors for the Cambodians to begin firing. The strongly-worded complaint stated, “the above-mentioned intrusion of the Cambodian soldiers into Thailand’s territory is a serious violation of Thailand’s sovereignty and territorial integrity. Furthermore, the shooting by the Cambodian troops against the unarmed Thai para-military rangers is regarded as a brutal and aggressive act and is contrary to the spirit of friendly relations between Cambodia and Thailand.”

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

May 28, 2008

International ban on cluster bombs \”very close\” says British Prime Minister

International ban on cluster bombs “very close” says British Prime Minister

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, May 28, 2008

United Kingdom
Related articles
Location of the United Kingdom
United Kingdom (orthographic projection).svg
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

British Prime Minister Gordon Brown has said that an international treaty aimed at banning the use of cluster bombs is “very close” to being achieved. It is hoped that many other countries, whether present at the talks or not, such as the United States and Canada, will sign up to the treaty.

An American B-1b Lancer drops cluster bombs.
Image: U.S. Air Force.

Cluster bombs have been used in countries such as Cambodia, Kosovo, Afghanistan and Lebanon. More than 100 countries and multiple humanitarian organisations have supported a ban on their use, as they can remain dangerous for many years after being dropped and can cause “unacceptable harm to civilians”.

Brown’s comments come after ten days of talks in Dublin between 109 nations, but countries such as the United States, Russia and China oppose the treaty. A final draft is due to be shown to delegates at a talk this afternoon and could result in a deal “by the end of the week, possibly sooner” according the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

The move by Brown would mean that the entire stockpile of cluster bombs owned by the UK would be scrapped, costing taxpayers millions. While many countries such as Britain, Germany, Japan and Switzerland have asked for 7 to 15 years to fully implement the rules, many humanitarian organisations have criticised this suggestion.



Related news

Sources

Wikipedia Learn more about Cluster bomb and Cluster Munition Coalition on Wikipedia.
Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

International ban on cluster bombs \”very close\” says British Prime Minister

Wednesday, May 28, 2008

Other stories from The United Kingdom
…More articles here
Location of the United Kingdom

A map showing the location of the United Kingdom


News from the United Kingdom

To write, edit, start or view other articles on the United Kingdom, see the United Kingdom Portal

British Prime Minister Gordon Brown has said that an international treaty, aimed at banning the use of cluster bombs is “very close” to being achieved. It is hoped that many other countries, both present at the talks and those not present, such as the United States and Canada will sign up to the treaty.

An American B-1b Lancer drops cluster bombs. Image: U.S. Air Force.

An American B-1b Lancer drops cluster bombs.
Image: U.S. Air Force.

Cluster bombs have been used in countries such as Cambodia, Kosovo, Afghanistan and Lebanon but they more than 100 countries and multiple humanitarian organisations have supported the creation of the ban on their use, as they can remain dangerous for many years after being dropped and can cause “unacceptable harm to civilians”.

The claim comes after 10 days of talks in Dublin between 109 nations, however countries such as the United States, Russia and China oppose the treaty. A final draft is due to be shown to delegates at the talk this afternoon and could result in a deal “by the end of the week, possibly sooner” according the the British Foreign and Commonwealth Office.

The move by Mr Brown would also mean that the entire stockpile of cluster bombs owned by the UK would also be scrapped, costing taxpayers millions. However many countries such as Britain, Germany, Japan and Switzerland asked for 7 to 15 years to bring in the rules, however many humanitarian organisations have criticised this move.


Related news

Sources

Wikipedia
Learn more about Cluster bomb and Cluster Munition Coalition on Wikipedia.
  • “Ban on cluster bombs ‘very close'”. BBC News Online, May 28, 2008
  • Peter O’Neil “Pressure on Canada as Britain backs cluster-bomb ban”. Canada.com, May 28, 2008
  • Michael Evans “Britain ready to sign cluster-bomb treaty”. The Times Online, May 28, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
Older Posts »

Powered by WordPress