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August 2, 2012

Quebec election called for September

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Thursday, August 2, 2012

Jean Charest in 2010
Image: US Mission Canada.

Following speculation from the media, Quebec, Canada premier Jean Charest has called a provincial election for September 4, 2012. After meeting with Lieutenant Governor Pierre Duchesne to officially drop the writ and dissolve parliament, he made the public announcement on Wednesday in front of Québec City Jean Lesage International Airport, stating the airport represents a “bridge to the north” (in reference to his government’s plan to develop natural resources in northern Quebec).

Flag of Quebec

Charest is the leader of the Quebec Liberal Party and has held his position as premier since 2003. This time, it is uncertain whether he will continue to govern or not, since polls are showing no clear winner.

This election comes in the midst of widely-reported student protests against a raise in university tuition, which is expected to be one of the major issues of the elections. One other party, the Coalition Avenir Québec, is in favour of the tuition increases, while the Parti Québécois, Option nationale, and Québec solidaire oppose the tuition increases.

The Quebec Liberal Party is federalist, meaning it supports Quebec being part of Canada, while the other major parties are separatist, meaning they support Quebec becoming a sovereign state. During his speech, Charest reaffirmed his position on tuition fees and was quoted as saying he was representing the “silent majority.”



Sister links

  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg 2012 Quebec student protests
  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg Quebec sovereignty movement

Sources

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Quebec election called for September 2012

Quebec election called for September 2012

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Thursday, August 2, 2012

Quebec, Canada premier Jean Charest has called a provincial election for September 4. After meeting with Lieutenant Governor Pierre Duchesne to officially drop the writ and dissolve parliament, he made the public announcement yesterday in front of Québec City Jean Lesage International Airport, stating the airport represents a “bridge to the north”, in reference to his government’s plan to develop natural resources in northern Quebec.

Jean Charest in 2010
Image: US Mission Canada.

Charest is the leader of the Quebec Liberal Party, has held his position as premier since 2003, and has been a member of the National Assembly since 1998. He has now won four consecutive elections in his riding of Sherbrooke, first becoming the leader of the official opposition, then becoming premier for three terms. At this time, polls show no clear winner for the upcoming election.

This election comes in the midst of widely reported student protests against a raise in university tuition, which is expected to be one of the major issues of the elections. One other party, the Coalition Avenir Québec, is in favour of the tuition increases, while the Parti Québécois, Option nationale, and Québec solidaire oppose the tuition increases.

The Quebec Liberal Party is federalist, meaning it supports Quebec being part of Canada, while the other major parties are separatist, meaning they support Quebec becoming a sovereign state. During his speech, Charest reaffirmed his position on tuition fees and was quoted as saying he was representing the “silent majority.”



Sister links

  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg 2012 Quebec student protests
  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg Quebec sovereignty movement
  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg Quebec general election, 2012

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December 9, 2008

Wikinews Shorts: December 9, 2008

Wikinews Shorts: December 9, 2008 – Wikinews, the free news source

Wikinews Shorts: December 9, 2008

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A compilation of brief news reports for Tuesday, December 9, 2008.

Help Wikinews! Contribute to Wikinews by expanding these briefs or add a new one.

US media group Tribune files for bankruptcy protection

Tribune Company logo.png

The United States media group Tribune Company has filed for bankruptcy protection on Monday as it struggled to sort out its US$13 billion debt. It is the second-largest newspaper publisher in the United States, responsible for the Chicago Tribune and the Los Angeles Times, among others.

The firm has been hit hard by the industry-wide slump in newspaper advert revenues this year. Sam Zell, the billionaire who owns Tribune, took out large loans in order to buy the firm back in June of 2007.

The United States Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection law states that a company can continue trading whilst it sorts out its finances.

Sources


Quebec votes in general election

Quebec

The Quebec general election is underway in the Canadian province of Quebec. Premier Jean Charest called the elections, saying he needed a majority to guide Quebec through a period of economic difficulties caused by the worldwide financial crisis.

Polls indicate that the Charest may obtain a majority, with support for his Quebec Liberal Party increasing to 45%, while support for the Parti Québécois remains at around 30%.

The polls will close at 01:00 GMT (20:00 local time), and the results will probably come in soon after that.

Sources


Bailout for US automakers nears agreement

Ford headquarters

The United States government is reportedly close to an agreement for a US$15 billion bailout plan for the country’s three largest auto firms.

According to a draft obtained by the Associated Press, the deal would give loans to Detroit’s struggling Big Three automobile manufacturers — Ford, General Motors, and Chrysler — but under the condition that the auto industry restructures itself to survive. Another condition is that the incumbent US President, George W. Bush, would appoint an overseer to supervise the effort.

Analysts suggest that the agreement could be signed into law by the end of this week.

Sources



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Quebec\’s Liberal premier Jean Charest wins third term

Quebec’s Liberal premier Jean Charest wins third term

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Tuesday, December 9, 2008

File:Charrest.jpg

Jean Charest.
(Image missing from commons: image; log)

In the Quebec general election held in the Canadian province of Quebec on December 8, 2008, premier Jean Charest was elected for his third mandate, and formed a majority government of Quebec.

This is the first time since the 1950’s, Maurice Duplessis and the Union Nationale that a party and/or leader has been elected to a third consecutive mandate, and the first for the Liberals since the 1920’s and Premier Taschereau. The ruling Liberals have won a slim majority, taking 66 of the provincial legislature’s 125 seats, while the separatist Parti Quebecois (PQ), led by Pauline Marois, finished second, and took 51 seats.

John James Charest, PC MNA, is a Canadian lawyer and politician from the province of Quebec and a former leader of the federal Progressive Conservative Party (1993–1998), the current leader of the Quebec Liberal Party, and the 29th and current Premier of Quebec. In November 5, 2008, seeing a chance to win a majority, Charest called a snap election for December 8. His party captured a slim majority of seats in the election.

Meanwhile, Action democratique du Quebec leader Mario Dumont announced that he will be leaving politics: “You will not be surprised to hear me tell you that I will not be at the head of my party during the next general election in Quebec. It is with much passion that I have served Quebec for more than 14 years as an MNA and more than 20 years as a party activist. I have loved what I did, but the time has come for me to turn the page.”

Parti Quebecois leader Pauline Marois claims that the PQ is a big winner, for she greatly improved on the party’s 2007 disastrous performance: “Today we form the strongest Official Opposition since the Quiet Revolution. Tonight we have been reminded that the Parti Quebecois is a great party. It is a party that has rediscovered its fire […] Even if we are a little disappointed tonight, the great dream we have for Quebec is very much alive.”



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Quebec’s Liberal premier Jean Charest wins third term

Tuesday, December 9, 2008

Other Canadian stories
…More articles here
Location of Canada

A map showing the location of Canada

Portal:Canada
To write, edit, start or view other Canada articles, see the Canada Portal

In the Quebec general election held in the Canadian province of Quebec on December 8, 2008, premier Jean Charest was elected for his third mandate, and formed a majority government of Quebec.

This is the first time since the 1950’s, Maurice Duplessis and the Union Nationale that a party and/or leader has been elected to a third consecutive mandate, and the first for the Liberals since the 1920’s and Premier Taschereau. The ruling Liberals have won a slim majority, taking 66 of the provincial legislature’s 125 seats, while the separatist Parti Quebecois (PQ), led by Pauline Marois, finished second, and took 51 seats.

John James Charest, PC MNA, is a Canadian lawyer and politician from the province of Quebec and a former leader of the federal Progressive Conservative Party (1993–1998), the current leader of the Quebec Liberal Party, and the 29th and current Premier of Quebec. In November 5, 2008, seeing a chance to win a majority, Charest called a snap election for December 8. His party captured a slim majority of seats in the election.

Meanwhile, Action democratique du Quebec leader Mario Dumont announced that he will be leaving politics: “You will not be surprised to hear me tell you that I will not be at the head of my party during the next general election in Quebec. It is with much passion that I have served Quebec for more than 14 years as an MNA and more than 20 years as a party activist. I have loved what I did, but the time has come for me to turn the page.”

Parti Quebecois leader Pauline Marois claims that the PQ is a big winner, for she greatly improved on the party’s 2007 disastrous performance: “Today we form the strongest Official Opposition since the Quiet Revolution. Tonight we have been reminded that the Parti Quebecois is a great party. It is a party that has rediscovered its fire […] Even if we are a little disappointed tonight, the great dream we have for Quebec is very much alive.”


Related news

Sources

  • Amy Luft “Quebec’s Liberal premier wins third term”. AFP, December 9, 2008
  • “Quebec Liberals win re-election”. BBC, December 9, 2008
  • Graeme Hamilton “Charest Liberals Win Slim Majority”. National Post, December 9, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Quebec’s Liberal premier Jean Charest wins third term

Tuesday, December 9, 2008

In the Quebec general election held in the Canadian province of Quebec on December 8, 2008, premier Jean Charest was elected for his third mandate, and formed a majority government of Quebec.

This is the first time since the 1950’s, Maurice Duplessis and the Union Nationale that a party and/or leader has been elected to a third consecutive mandate, and the first for the Liberals since the 1920’s and Premier Taschereau. The ruling Liberals have won a slim majority, taking 66 of the provincial legislature’s 125 seats, while the separatist Parti Quebecois (PQ), led by Pauline Marois, finished second, and took 51 seats.

John James Charest, PC MNA, is a Canadian lawyer and politician from the province of Quebec and a former leader of the federal Progressive Conservative Party (1993–1998), the current leader of the Quebec Liberal Party, and the 29th and current Premier of Quebec. In November 5, 2008, seeing a chance to win a majority, Charest called a snap election for December 8. His party captured a slim majority of seats in the election.

Meanwhile, Action democratique du Quebec leader Mario Dumont announced that he will be leaving politics: “You will not be surprised to hear me tell you that I will not be at the head of my party during the next general election in Quebec. It is with much passion that I have served Quebec for more than 14 years as an MNA and more than 20 years as a party activist. I have loved what I did, but the time has come for me to turn the page.”

Parti Quebecois leader Pauline Marois claims that the PQ is a big winner, for she greatly improved on the party’s 2007 disastrous performance: “Today we form the strongest Official Opposition since the Quiet Revolution. Tonight we have been reminded that the Parti Quebecois is a great party. It is a party that has rediscovered its fire […] Even if we are a little disappointed tonight, the great dream we have for Quebec is very much alive.”


Related news

Sources

  • Amy Luft “Quebec’s Liberal premier wins third term”. AFP, December 9, 2008
  • “Quebec Liberals win re-election”. BBC, December 9, 2008
  • Graeme Hamilton “Charest Liberals Win Slim Majority”. National Post, December 9, 2008


Image:Top-left-corner.png Canada Image:Top-right-corner.png
Location of Canada

A map showing the location of Canada

Other Canadian stories
…More articles here
 

 

 

 

To write, edit, start or view other Canadian articles, see the Canadian Portal  


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 7, 2008

Quebec’s Liberal premier Jean Charest wins third term

Sunday, December 7, 2008

Other Canadian stories
…More articles here
Location of Canada

A map showing the location of Canada

Portal:Canada
To write, edit, start or view other Canada articles, see the Canada Portal
Quebec
Jean Charest

In the Quebec general election held in the Canadian province of Quebec on December 8, 2008, Jean Charest is elected for his 3rd mandate and forms a majority government of Quebec.

This is the first time since the 1950’s, Maurice Duplessis and the Union Nationale that a party and/or leader has been elected to a third consecutive mandate, and the first for the Liberals since the 1920’s and Premier Taschereau. The ruling Liberals has won a slim majority taking 66 of the provincial legislature’s 125 seats, while the separatist Parti Quebecois (PQ), led by Pauline Marois finished second and had only 51.

John James Charest, PC MNA is a Canadian lawyer and politician from the province of Quebec and a former leader of the federal Progressive Conservative Party (1993–1998), the current leader of the Quebec Liberal Party and, the 29th and current Premier of Quebec. In November 5, 2008, seeing a chance to win a majority, Charest called a snap election for December 8. His party captured a slim majority of seats in the election.

Meanwhile, Action democratique du Quebec leader Mario Dumont announces leaving politics: “You will not be surprised to hear me tell you that I will not be at the head of my party during the next general election in Quebec. It is with much passion that I have served Quebec for more than 14 years as an MNA and more than 20 years as a party activist. I have loved what I did, but the time has come for me to turn the page.”

Parti Quebecois leader Pauline Marois claims PQ is a big winner, for she greatly improved on the party’s 2007 disastrous performance: “Today we form the strongest Official Opposition since the Quiet Revolution.Tonight we have been reminded that the Parti Quebecois is a great party. It is a party that has rediscovered its fire…. Even if we are a little disappointed tonight, the great dream we have for Quebec is very much alive.”


Related news

Sources

  • Amy Luft “Quebec’s Liberal premier wins third term”. AFP, December 9, 2008
  • “Quebec Liberals win re-election”. BBC, December 9, 2008
  • Graeme Hamilton “Charest Liberals Win Slim Majority”. National Post, December 9, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Quebec’s Liberal premier Jean Charest wins third term

Sunday, December 7, 2008

Other Canadian stories
…More articles here
Location of Canada

A map showing the location of Canada

Portal:Canada
To write, edit, start or view other Canada articles, see the Canada Portal
Quebec
Jean Charest

In the Quebec general election held in the Canadian province of Quebec on December 8, 2008, Jean Charest is elected for his 3rd mandate and forms a majority government of Quebec.

This is the first time since the 1950’s, Maurice Duplessis and the Union Nationale that a party and/or leader has been elected to a third consecutive mandate, and the first for the Liberals since the 1920’s and Premier Taschereau. The ruling Liberals has won a slim majority taking 66 of the provincial legislature’s 125 seats, while the separatist Parti Quebecois (PQ), led by Pauline Marois finished second and had only 51.

John James Charest, PC MNA is a Canadian lawyer and politician from the province of Quebec and a former leader of the federal Progressive Conservative Party (1993–1998), the current leader of the Quebec Liberal Party and, the 29th and current Premier of Quebec. In November 5, 2008, seeing a chance to win a majority, Charest called a snap election for December 8. His party captured a slim majority of seats in the election.

Meanwhile, Action democratique du Quebec leader Mario Dumont announces leaving politics: “You will not be surprised to hear me tell you that I will not be at the head of my party during the next general election in Quebec. It is with much passion that I have served Quebec for more than 14 years as an MNA and more than 20 years as a party activist. I have loved what I did, but the time has come for me to turn the page.”

Parti Quebecois leader Pauline Marois claims PQ is a big winner, for she greatly improved on the party’s 2007 disastrous performance: “Today we form the strongest Official Opposition since the Quiet Revolution.Tonight we have been reminded that the Parti Quebecois is a great party. It is a party that has rediscovered its fire…. Even if we are a little disappointed tonight, the great dream we have for Quebec is very much alive.”


Related news

Sources

  • Amy Luft “Quebec’s Liberal premier wins third term”. AFP, December 9, 2008
  • “Quebec Liberals win re-election”. BBC, December 9, 2008
  • Graeme Hamilton “Charest Liberals Win Slim Majority”. National Post, December 9, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

September 4, 2008

Pre-election call, Conservatives start ads, including during kids TV

Thursday, September 4, 2008

Other Canadian stories
…More articles here
Location of Canada

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Portal:Canada
To write, edit, start or view other Canada articles, see the Canada Portal
Stephen Harper in 2006, delivering his 2006 election acceptance speech.

Stephen Harper in 2006, delivering his 2006 election acceptance speech.

Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper may not have dropped the writ for an election yet, but his party is airing advertisements on both television and radio.

Because the election is not yet official — though it is scheduled for October 19, 2009 and could be held as soon as October of this year — the ads do not count against the Conservative Party’s campaign spending limit. They have been airing since Thursday.

The advertisement includes various Canadians making statements about Harper, as opposed to the Conservative platform. One woman shown in a parking lot says that she likes “the idea that he’s a family man with young children.”

The Canadian Press notes that all four major party leaders are married and have children.

Other statements include “[h]e’s doing a good job,” “I’ve never been so proud to be Canadian,” “[h]e’s on the right track” and “I like him.”

Political communication expert Jonathan Rose of Queen’s University in Kingston, Ontario told the Canadian Press: “By relying on typical Canadians in the ads, the Conservatives are hoping that the voter will find the connection powerful. Unfortunately, these kind of ads are based on assertions, not arguments. There is no evidence given to support the claims made in them.”

A writer for the The Montreal Gazette comments that, “at the end, it’s hard to tell whether Stephen Harper is trying to smile or grimacing with the effort to convey warmth.”

Kids TV among media buy

The Conservative Party ads are airing during children’s programming, amongst other air times, presumed to be an attempt to reach parents.

Gazette writer Elizabeth Thompson noted that her daughter had seen one of the ads during an airing of SpongeBob SquarePants on television station YTV. Thompson criticized the choice to air the ads in the time slot, after her daughter repeated the ad claims “matter-of-factly”.

SpongeBob SquarePants was shown in a recent poll to be watched by 24 percent of parents with their child. About 41 percent of YTV’s audience is above the age of majority, and 68 percent of its reach composition, according to fall 2007 statistics by BBM Nielsen Media Research.


Sources

  • Wikipedians “40th Canadian federal election”. Wikipedia, 20:35, September 3, 2008
  • Our TV Ads“, Conservative Party of Canada, undated.
  • “Conservatives release ‘softer’ pre-election ad”. The Hill Times, September 1, 2008
  • Elizabeth Thompson “SpongeBob SquarePants for Harper”. Montreal Gazette, September 2, 2008
  • Don MacPherson “The new Joe Clark”. The Montreal Gazette, September 4, 2008
  • “Highlights from the Latest YTV Brand Tracking Study”, YTV (Corus Entertainment)
  • “YTV’s Reach Composition (Average Weekly Reach) – Fall 2007”, YTV (Corus Entertainment)
  • “YTV’s Audience Composition (AMA) – Fall 2007”, YTV (Corus Entertainment)
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

October 27, 2007

New bill will ban Muslims from wearing veils at polls in Canada

New bill will ban Muslims from wearing veils at polls in Canada

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Saturday, October 27, 2007

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In some countries women cover their faces almost completely, as illustrated here.

A new bill will propose a law to amend the Canada Elections Act to ban Muslims from wearing veils (or niqab’s) while at polls.

“During the recent by-elections in Quebec, the government made it clear that we disagreed with the decision by Elections Canada to allow people to vote while concealing their face. That is why, in the Speech from the Throne, we committed to introducing legislation to confirm the visual identification of voters,” said Leader of the Government in the House of Commons, Peter Van Loan. “Today, with the introduction of this Bill, we have fulfilled that commitment.”

“While there was no apparent case of fraud in the recent Quebec by-elections, it was widely reported that numerous individuals voted while purposefully concealing their face,” said Member of Parliament Lawrence Cannon. “This caused people to question the credibility and integrity of the voting process. In a democratic system, it is crucial that confidence in our democracy be maintained. This Bill will maintain that confidence.”

Muslims will need to uncover when voting at all federal elections, by-elections, and advance polls. Citizens who are vouching for a voter who doesn’t have an ID will have to uncover their face as well. People who are medically required to have their faces covered are given an exception but will need to show photo ID and two pieces of other ID, or they will have to be vouched for by someone, who is not wearing a face covering, or removes their face covering. Alternatively they can make an oath saying it would be against the rules of their doctor or be harmful to their health to remove their face covering.

Elections Canada volunteers would need to, somehow, suit the voter to their religious needs, if necessary.

According to the press release it will allow “someone to be recognized, who is attempting to commit an offense at the polls (e.g. someone trying to vote twice),” and it will “restore public confidence in the electoral process.”

Bill C-31 allowed voters to wear veils as long as they showed two pieces of ID, with one displaying their address. If they only brought one piece, photo ID or not, they would be required to remove their veils. If the person had a voting card, the problem would not exist. However, the new proposed bill would require Muslims to remove their veil regardless of if they have a voting card.

The Chief Electoral Officer for Elections Quebec refused to come to agreement with the Federal Government’s opposition of his position of letting voters only remove their veils when they only brought one photo and no other ID, so they could compare their identity to the photo. He could have supported the Federal Government’s opposition and change the requirements, but since he didn’t the Canada Elections Act has been proposed to be amended.

“If anybody had actually bothered to ask the women that are actually concerned, and we are talking about a very small minority of women, they would have told them that they always take it off to identify their faces. And they do it at the bank, they do it at border crossings, they do it at the airport,” said Sarah Elgazzar, a spokeswoman for the Canada Council on American-Islamic Relations in September.



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