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March 12, 2015

Ten killed in helicopter crash in Argentina, French Olympians among the dead

Ten killed in helicopter crash in Argentina, French Olympians among the dead

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Thursday, March 12, 2015

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File photo of a ‘Eurocopter’, similar to the aircraft involved in the collision.
Image: Elisabeth Klimesch.

Three French sport stars are among the dead following a helicopter crash on Monday in Villa Castelli, Argentina. In total, ten people died after the crash, which involved two helicopters. The dead included passengers and both pilots in the mid-air collision. The victims were taking part in the French reality television show ‘Dropped‘ when the accident happened.

The victims included Olympic swimmer Camille Muffat, Olympic boxer Alexis Vastine and Florence Arthaud, a yachtswoman. Both pilots were Argentinian, the remainder of the victims were French and worked as part of the television shows production team. Bodies of all ten of the victims have been retrieved and taken to the morgue.

The accident occurred while both helicopters were flying at a low altitude in tandem. Amateur camera footage shows the helicopters colliding when one appears to fly into the path of the other. It remains unclear what caused actions which lead to the crash. Cesar Angulo, Secretary of Security for La Rioja, the province in which the accident happened released an update. He said “An explosion occurred and it’s believed that they must have collided. Aeronautical experts will have to determine that.”

French President Francois Hollande paid tribute to the victims. Speaking about the sport stars who lost their lives he said “They are dead because they wanted to push the boundaries. They wanted to make new exploits known to the world, make people aware of new countries and regions.” An involuntary manslaughter investigation has been opened by French officials. The procedure occurred automatically due to the fact the French citizens died abroad.

The television show involves contestants taking part in survival style activities in remote locations. Other contestants taking part included figure skater Philippe Candeloro, footballer Sylvain Wiltord, snowboarder Anne-Flore Marxer, swimmer Alain Bernard and Jeannie Longo, a cyclist. All the other contestants were uninjured during the accident.

The show, which was to be shown on TF1 in France started filming in February. The channel released a statement after the accident. They said “We learn with immense sadness of the accident that occurred during the filming of the show ‘Dropped.’ [Staff] come together in this terrible time with the pain of the families and those close to the victims”. French media announced that all contestants and crew are returning home and that filming had been suspended.

Muffat became the Olympic champion in the 400m freestyle event at the 2012 Summer Olympics in London, England. The 25-year-old also won a silver and bronze medal at the same games in different events. Vastine, 28, also competed at the 2012 games, being eliminated from the Light Welterweight category in the quarter finals. He won a gold medal in the 2008 games in Beijing, China. Arthaud, 57, was a yachtswoman who won the 1990 Route du Rhum.



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September 5, 2012

Brazil defeats China in 5-a-side football in group play at London Paralympics

Brazil defeats China in 5-a-side football in group play at London Paralympics

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Jump to: navigation, search
2012 Summer Paralympics

Trafalgar Square, London - London 2012 - countdown clock.jpg

Newest 2012 Paralympic stories
  • 29 June 2014: Medal-seeking Spanish men arrive at 2014 Goalball World Championships
  • 26 June 2014: Belgian men’s goalball team departs for Finland for World Championships
  • 3 January 2014: Wikinews interviews Australian wheelchair basketball player Tina McKenzie
  • 15 August 2013: Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic swimmer Deborah Font
  • 11 August 2013: Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic swimmer Marta Gómez

Wednesday, September 5, 2012

Brazil warms up
Image: Laura Hale.

China warms up
Image: Laura Hale.

London, England — Yesterday at London’s Riverbank Arena, Brazil’s 5-a-side blind football team took on China in both teams’ final game of group play. Brazil won 1–0, topping Group B.

Both teams came into the game with similar records. Each had one win and a draw, and were tied on goal difference. A win would see them through to the finals. In case of a draw, the two sides would be reduced to drawing lots.

Brazil won gold in 5-a-side football at both past Paralympic Games where it was included — Athens in 2004, and Beijing in 2008 where they defeated China 2–1 in the final. China won silver in Beijing even though they had no national team prior to hosting the Games there.

There were about 150 people in the crowd at the Riverbank Arena when the game began, although this swelled to over 500 after half time. The weather was sunny and warm. There were a number of flags on display in the crowd, including the flags of Brazil, Turkey and France, and the ubiquitous Union Flag.

The two teams had different rituals when their national anthems were played. The Brazilians had their hands over their hearts, whereas the Chinese stood at attention and sang while theirs was played. Most startlingly, they threw their hands up in the air and shouted at the end.

Five-a-side football players wear blindfolds to insure a level playing field, as some blind people are more blind than others. However, the goalkeepers are sighted, and, like the goalkeepers in regular football, can use their hands. When ball is in play, spectators are asked to be keep silent so the players can hear the ball, which has bells in it. It was quite loud, and audible from the bleachers. It is also heavier than a regular football. There are three guides for each team who tell players where the ball is.

The blue artificial surface — the same used for the hockey during the Olympics — could be slippery at times. Occasionally the players would run into each other or the goal post. At one point, the Brazilian goalkeeper stopped the ball with his crotch, which caused his to fall to the ground writing in pain. The umpire cautioned him at one point but never produced any coloured cards.

The playing field is smaller than a regular football pitch, and the goal is small. The pitch has walls on the sides that help to rebound the sound and the ball itself. Bouncing the ball of the side is a standard tactic. The rules are fairly similar to eleven-a-side football. The game consists of two 25 minute halves with a 10 minute break between halves. There is no off-side rule.

Both sides played defensively, with three players back and one forward, so there was little passing but a lot of foot skill. In earlier games they played with two forward and two back. As a rule, the Brazilians favoured a more open style of play. The game was fairly even early on. Brazil had a couple of good shots at goal that the Chinese goal keeper was lucky to stop. China’s Wang Zhoubin also had a shot at goal that bounced off the goal post with a resounding noise.

About 21 minutes in, Brazil’s Jeferson da Conceicai Goncalves scored the first goal. His teammates jumped all over field, and guides walked the players to the team celebration.

After half time, the defensive game continued, although Brazil started sending another player forward. Chinese attacks tended to still be from a single player. Shortly after halftime, a mix up saw two Brazilian defenders compete for the ball, and they nearly scored an own goal. Wang then made a spectacular shot which missed the goal.

As the second half wore on, China switched to a two-forward formation. Li Xiaoqiang and Wang pressed a series of attacks, which garnered a lot of ooohs from the crowd but nothing on the scoreboard. Meanwhile, Brazil continued aggressively, with Marcos Jose Alves Felipe in particular looking threatening.

The Brazilian contingent in the crowd roared loudly at the final siren. Asked how he felt to have made the semifinals, Brazil Coach Ramon Pereira de Souza said: “I have no words. My happiness is shaped on all the faces of the players and coaches in the team. It was a difficult game. It is the passage to the next stage. Facing China is not like facing any other team. China has spectacular players.”



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


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September 2, 2012

Australian Jayme Paris wins bronze in the London Paralympics Women\’s Individual C1-2-3 500m Time Trial

Australian Jayme Paris wins bronze in the London Paralympics Women’s Individual C1-2-3 500m Time Trial

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
2012 Summer Paralympics

Trafalgar Square, London - London 2012 - countdown clock.jpg

Newest 2012 Paralympic stories
  • 29 June 2014: Medal-seeking Spanish men arrive at 2014 Goalball World Championships
  • 26 June 2014: Belgian men’s goalball team departs for Finland for World Championships
  • 3 January 2014: Wikinews interviews Australian wheelchair basketball player Tina McKenzie
  • 15 August 2013: Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic swimmer Deborah Font
  • 11 August 2013: Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic swimmer Marta Gómez

Sunday, September 2, 2012

Jayme Paris on the podium with He and Norbruis
Image: Laura Hale.

London, England — Yesterday at London’s Velodrome, Australia’s Jayme Paris took home bronze in the Paralympic Track Cycling Women’s Individual C123 500m Time Trial event, earning back to back bronzes in this event. Yin He of China took gold, and Alyda Norbruis of the Netherlands won a silver.

C1 classified Paris pushed the other riders, setting a world record for her classification with a time of 45.449 seconds and factored time of 40.476 seconds. This bettered her own world and Paralympic record she set at the 2008 Summer Paralympics with a time of 46.427 seconds. C2 classified He also set a classification world record in her ride, with a time of 42.448 seconds and factored time of 39.158 seconds.

While the Blacktown, New South Wales native was on the track, the commentator led spectators in chanting with the traditional “Aussie-Aussie-Aussie”, where spectators respond “Oi-Oi-Oi”. There were two big Australian flags waving during the race, with fans cheering loudly in support of the Australian rider.

On the first day of competition, Paris finished eighth in the Women’s Individual C1-2-3 Pursuit Qualification race and did not qualify for the finals despite setting a world record time of 4:40.123 in her classification.



Sources

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This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


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January 6, 2009

Imperial College London geology students fined in China for “illegal map-making”

Tuesday, January 6, 2009

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Royal School of Mines (entrance and the Goldsmiths’ wing, Prince Consort Road, London) comprises Imperial College London‘s Earth Science, Engineering, and Materials departments.

Three British geology students of Imperial College London have been fined in China for “illegal survey and map-making activities”, according to local media. The students were researching earthquake activity, fault lines and making maps in Xinjiang, which is a tense Muslim province to the west of the country, and where anger against Chinese rule caused the deadly attacks in 2008.

The students were gathering additional data in several regions, including Kashgar, the ancient Silk Road trading post, and an oasis city in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of the People’s Republic of China.

Under Dr Jian Guo Liu, supervisor, a Reader in Remote Sensing at Imperial College, they also had been in the poor desert village of Keping, where local authorities in May burned the local mosque due to “unlawful religious activities.” Of the threee, the two students, a PhD student aged 23, and a Master of Science student aged 22, went to Aksu Prefecture for their research.

In September, State Security Bureau officials had investigated the students at a hotel for several hours. Thereafter, their equipment, including GPS devices, survey results, and data, were seized. The Aksu Land and Resources Bureau officers claimed they had gathered “illegal data” from 6,000 points which was valuable for mineral prospecting and topographical research.

Panorama of downtown Korla, Xinjiang in the majestic Tian Shan mountain range. May 2007.

In the leadup to last year’s summer Olympics in Beijing, China cracked down on map-making and data-collecting across the country. Despite having permission from the Earthquake Administration in the country, the students were fined a combined 20,000 yuan (2,940 dollars) but did not receive additional punishments. “The data they gathered would have been valuable in analysing mineral and topographic features of the areas,” Xinjiang Daily said. They returned to the UK on October 2.

According to The Procuratorial Daily, the Xinjiang prosecutors’ office approved 1,295 arrests of individuals and indicted 1,154 suspects from January to November 2008. The indictments were based on suspicion of “endangering state security.” In 2007, however, only 742 were arrested, while 619 of them were indicted for the same offense.

Related news

Sources

Wikipedia
Learn more about Imperial College London and Xinjiang on Wikipedia.
  • Richard Spencer “British students fined for ‘illegal map-making’ in China”. The Daily Telegraph, January 5, 2009
  • “China fines British students for ‘illegal map-making'”. Yahoo, January 5, 2009
  • “China fines UK students for ‘illegal map-making’: state media”. Agence France-Presse, January 5, 2009
  • Edward Wong “Nearly 1,300 arrested in Muslim region of China”. International Herald Tribune, January 5, 2009
  • “Kashgar”. Silkroadcn.com, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Imperial College London geology students fined in China for “illegal map-making”

Other stories from China
…More articles here
Location of China

A map showing the location of China

To write, edit, start or view other articles on China, see the China Portal
Portal:China

Tuesday, January 6, 2009

Royal School of Mines (entrance and the Goldsmiths’ wing, Prince Consort Road, London) comprises Imperial College London‘s Earth Science, Engineering, and Materials departments.

Three British geology students have been fined in China for “illegal map-making activities”, according to local media. The students were making maps in Xinjiang, which is a tense Muslim province to the west of the country.

Panorama of downtown Korla, Xinjiang in the majestic Tian Shan mountain range. May 2007.

The students are studying at the Imperial College London, and had been researching fault lines in Xinjiang. In the leadup to last year’s summer Olympics in Beijing, China cracked down on map-making and data-collecting across the country. Despite having permission from the Earthquake Administration in the country, the students were fined a combined 20,000 yuan and not handed down any other punishments.


Related news

Sources

Wikipedia
Learn more about Imperial College London and Xinjiang on Wikipedia.
  • “China fines British students for ‘illegal map-making'”. Yahoo, January 5, 2009
  • “China fines UK students for ‘illegal map-making’: state media”. Agence France-Presse, January 5, 2009
  • Edward Wong “Nearly 1,300 arrested in Muslim region of China”. International Herald Tribune, January, 2009
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Imperial College London geology students fined in China for “illegal map-making”

Other stories from China
…More articles here
Location of China

A map showing the location of China

To write, edit, start or view other articles on China, see the China Portal
Portal:China

Tuesday, January 6, 2009

Royal School of Mines (entrance and the Goldsmiths’ wing, Prince Consort Road, London) comprises Imperial College London‘s Earth Science, Engineering, and Materials departments.

Three British geology students of Imperial College London have been fined in China for “illegal map-making activities”, according to local media. The students were researching fault lines and making maps in Xinjiang, which is a tense Muslim province to the west of the country, and where anger against Chinese rule caused the 2008 deadly attacks.

The students were also gathering data in several regions, including Kashgar, the ancient Silk Road trading post, and an oasis city in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of the People’s Republic of China. The students also had been in the poor desert village of Keping, where local authorities in May burned the local mosque due to “unlawful religious activities.”

Panorama of downtown Korla, Xinjiang in the majestic Tian Shan mountain range. May 2007.

The students are studying at the Imperial College London, and had been researching fault lines in the remote western region of Xinjiang, where anger against Chinese rule caused the 2008 deadly attacks.

In the leadup to last year’s summer Olympics in Beijing, China cracked down on map-making and data-collecting across the country. Despite having permission from the Earthquake Administration in the country, the students were fined a combined 20,000 yuan (2,940 dollars) but did not receive additional punishments. “The data they gathered would have been valuable in analysing mineral and topographic features of the areas,” Xinjiang Daily said.


Related news

Sources

Wikipedia
Learn more about Imperial College London and Xinjiang on Wikipedia.
  • “China fines British students for ‘illegal map-making'”. Yahoo, January 5, 2009
  • “China fines UK students for ‘illegal map-making’: state media”. Agence France-Presse, January 5, 2009
  • Edward Wong “Nearly 1,300 arrested in Muslim region of China”. International Herald Tribune, January 5, 2009
  • “Kashgar”. Silkroadcn.com, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Imperial College London geology students fined in China for “illegal map-making”

Other stories from China
…More articles here
Location of China

A map showing the location of China

To write, edit, start or view other articles on China, see the China Portal
Portal:China

Tuesday, January 6, 2009

Royal School of Mines (entrance and the Goldsmiths’ wing, Prince Consort Road, London) comprises Imperial College London‘s Earth Science, Engineering, and Materials departments.

Three British geology students of Imperial College London have been fined in China for “illegal map-making activities”, according to local media. The students were researching fault lines and making maps in Xinjiang, which is a tense Muslim province to the west of the country, and where anger against Chinese rule caused the 2008 deadly attacks.

The students were also gathering data in several regions, including Kashgar, the ancient Silk Road trading post, and an oasis city in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of the People’s Republic of China. The students also had been in the poor desert village of Keping, where local authorities in May burned the local mosque due to “unlawful religious activities.”

Panorama of downtown Korla, Xinjiang in the majestic Tian Shan mountain range. May 2007.

The students are studying at the Imperial College London, and had been researching fault lines in the remote western region of Xinjiang, where anger against Chinese rule caused the 2008 deadly attacks.

In the leadup to last year’s summer Olympics in Beijing, China cracked down on map-making and data-collecting across the country. Despite having permission from the Earthquake Administration in the country, the students were fined a combined 20,000 yuan (2,940 dollars) but did not receive additional punishments. “The data they gathered would have been valuable in analysing mineral and topographic features of the areas,” Xinjiang Daily said.

According to The Procuratorial Daily, the Xinjiang prosecutors’ office approved 1,295 arrests of individuals and indicted 1,154 suspects from January to November 2008. The indictment was based on the crime of suspicion of “endangering state security.” In 2007, however, only 742 were arrested, while 619 of them were indicted for the same offense.


Related news

Sources

Wikipedia
Learn more about Imperial College London and Xinjiang on Wikipedia.
  • “China fines British students for ‘illegal map-making'”. Yahoo, January 5, 2009
  • “China fines UK students for ‘illegal map-making’: state media”. Agence France-Presse, January 5, 2009
  • Edward Wong “Nearly 1,300 arrested in Muslim region of China”. International Herald Tribune, January 5, 2009
  • “Kashgar”. Silkroadcn.com, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Imperial College London geology students fined in China for “illegal map-making”

Other stories from China
…More articles here
Location of China

A map showing the location of China

To write, edit, start or view other articles on China, see the China Portal
Portal:China

Tuesday, January 6, 2009

Royal School of Mines (entrance and the Goldsmiths’ wing, Prince Consort Road, London) comprises Imperial College London‘s Earth Science, Engineering, and Materials departments.

Three British geology students of Imperial College London have been fined in China for “illegal survey and map-making activities”, according to local media. The students were researching earthquake activity, fault lines and making maps in Xinjiang, which is a tense Muslim province to the west of the country, and where anger against Chinese rule caused the 2008 deadly attacks.

The students were also gathering data in several regions, including Kashgar, the ancient Silk Road trading post, and an oasis city in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of the People’s Republic of China. The students also had been in the poor desert village of Keping, where local authorities in May burned the local mosque due to “unlawful religious activities.” Of the threee, the two students, a PhD student aged 23, and a Master of Science student aged 22, went to Aksu Prefecture for their research.

The students are studying at the Imperial College London, and had been researching fault lines in the remote western region of Xinjiang, where anger against Chinese rule caused the 2008 deadly attacks.

In September, State Security Bureau officials had investigated the students at a hotel for several hours. Thereafter, their equipments, including GPS devices, survey results and data, were seized. The Aksu Land and Resources Bureau officers claimed they had gathered “illegal data” from 6,000 points which was valuable for mineral prospecting and topographical research.

Panorama of downtown Korla, Xinjiang in the majestic Tian Shan mountain range. May 2007.

In the leadup to last year’s summer Olympics in Beijing, China cracked down on map-making and data-collecting across the country. Despite having permission from the Earthquake Administration in the country, the students were fined a combined 20,000 yuan (2,940 dollars) but did not receive additional punishments. “The data they gathered would have been valuable in analysing mineral and topographic features of the areas,” Xinjiang Daily said.

According to The Procuratorial Daily, the Xinjiang prosecutors’ office approved 1,295 arrests of individuals and indicted 1,154 suspects from January to November 2008. The indictment was based on the crime of suspicion of “endangering state security.” In 2007, however, only 742 were arrested, while 619 of them were indicted for the same offense.


Related news

Sources

Wikipedia
Learn more about Imperial College London and Xinjiang on Wikipedia.
  • Richard Spencer “British students fined for ‘illegal map-making’ in China”. The Daily Telegraph, January 5, 2009
  • “China fines British students for ‘illegal map-making'”. Yahoo, January 5, 2009
  • “China fines UK students for ‘illegal map-making’: state media”. Agence France-Presse, January 5, 2009
  • Edward Wong “Nearly 1,300 arrested in Muslim region of China”. International Herald Tribune, January 5, 2009
  • “Kashgar”. Silkroadcn.com, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Imperial College London geology students fined in China for “illegal map-making”

Other stories from China
…More articles here
Location of China

A map showing the location of China

To write, edit, start or view other articles on China, see the China Portal
Portal:China

Tuesday, January 6, 2009

Royal School of Mines (entrance and the Goldsmiths’ wing, Prince Consort Road, London) comprises Imperial College London‘s Earth Science, Engineering, and Materials departments.

Three British geology students of Imperial College London have been fined in China for “illegal survey and map-making activities”, according to local media. The students were researching earthquake activity, fault lines and making maps in Xinjiang, which is a tense Muslim province to the west of the country, and where anger against Chinese rule caused the 2008 deadly attacks.

The students were also gathering data in several regions, including Kashgar, the ancient Silk Road trading post, and an oasis city in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of the People’s Republic of China.

Under Dr Jian Guo Liu, supervisor, a Reader in Remote Sensing at Imperial College, they also had been in the poor desert village of Keping, where local authorities in May burned the local mosque due to “unlawful religious activities.” Of the threee, the two students, a PhD student aged 23, and a Master of Science student aged 22, went to Aksu Prefecture for their research.

In September, State Security Bureau officials had investigated the students at a hotel for several hours. Thereafter, their equipments, including GPS devices, survey results and data, were seized. The Aksu Land and Resources Bureau officers claimed they had gathered “illegal data” from 6,000 points which was valuable for mineral prospecting and topographical research.

Panorama of downtown Korla, Xinjiang in the majestic Tian Shan mountain range. May 2007.

In the leadup to last year’s summer Olympics in Beijing, China cracked down on map-making and data-collecting across the country. Despite having permission from the Earthquake Administration in the country, the students were fined a combined 20,000 yuan (2,940 dollars) but did not receive additional punishments. “The data they gathered would have been valuable in analysing mineral and topographic features of the areas,” Xinjiang Daily said. They returned to the UK on October 2.

According to The Procuratorial Daily, the Xinjiang prosecutors’ office approved 1,295 arrests of individuals and indicted 1,154 suspects from January to November 2008. The indictment was based on the crime of suspicion of “endangering state security.” In 2007, however, only 742 were arrested, while 619 of them were indicted for the same offense.


Related news

Sources

Wikipedia
Learn more about Imperial College London and Xinjiang on Wikipedia.
  • Richard Spencer “British students fined for ‘illegal map-making’ in China”. The Daily Telegraph, January 5, 2009
  • “China fines British students for ‘illegal map-making'”. Yahoo, January 5, 2009
  • “China fines UK students for ‘illegal map-making’: state media”. Agence France-Presse, January 5, 2009
  • Edward Wong “Nearly 1,300 arrested in Muslim region of China”. International Herald Tribune, January 5, 2009
  • “Kashgar”. Silkroadcn.com, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

September 8, 2008

Paralympic highlights: September 8, 2008

Filed under: Beijing 2008 Olympic and Paralympic Summer Games — admin @ 5:00 am

Paralympic highlights: September 8, 2008

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, September 8, 2008

Beijing 2008 Olympic and Paralympic Summer Games
Other stories from the 2008 Olympic Games

September 8, 2008 is the 2nd major day of the 2008 Paralympic games, the below article summaries all the highlights.

Events

Women’s S6 100 metres freestyle

Eleanor Simmonds, Great Britain’s youngest athlete at the paralympic games, won the gold medal in the women’s S6 100 metres freestyle, despite the fact that she is only aged 13.

Simmonds, who has achondroplasia said that “I can’t believe it.” She then said that “in the last 25 (metres) I knew everybody was around me, so I just got my head into it, got my last bit of energy and just went for it.”

T54 women’s 5000m

Six of the eleven competitors in the final of the T54 class womens’s 5000m event failed to complete the course after a crash near the end of the race. As a result of this, a rerun will take place.

The medals won in the race will be returned due to this decision. The gold medal in the original race was won by the Canadian Diane Roy and the silver was taken by the British Shelly Woods.

The British competitor spoke about the crash after the race. “When the crash happened I had moved on the outside but I was at the back of the pack and was trying to get around someone,” she said. “It all happened so fast in front of me that I had to move my chair over quickly and from there it was just a race to the line. “

S10 women’s 100m Butterfly

The French Elodie Lorandi set a new world record in the S10 class of the women’s 100m butterfly with her time of 59.80 seconds. The record was set in the first heat of event.

Women’s 400m freestyle

Russian Anna Efimenko set a new world record in the S13 class of the women’s 400m freestyle with her time of 4 minutes and 37.37 seconds. The record was set in the final of the event.

Medal Table

2008 Paralympics – Beijing, China
Flag Country G S B TOT Rank
China China 8 10 10 28 1
USA USA 8 4 5 17 2
Great Britain Great Britain 7 5 3 15 3
Australia Australia 6 5 10 21 4
South Africa South Africa 4 0 0 4 5

Source: Official Medal Count (update)


Sources

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject:
2008 Summer Paralympics
Wikinews
Some information contained in this article was obtained from television, radio, or live webcast sources. Reporter’s notes and the broadcast source details are available at the collaboration page.
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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
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