Wiki Actu en

July 28, 2016

Verizon to acquire Yahoo!

Verizon to acquire Yahoo! – Wikinews, the free news source

Verizon to acquire Yahoo!

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, July 28, 2016

Economy and business
Euro coins and banknotes.jpg
Related articles
Collaborate!
  • Pillars of Wikinews writing
  • Writing an article

On Monday, US telecom giant Verizon announced acquisition of Yahoo! for a reported amount of US$4.83 billion (4.36 billion). Per the all-cash deal, Verizon would own only the core web business — in particular, Yahoo! Japan and Alibaba would not be acquired by Verizon.

Going public in 1996, Yahoo! provided e-mail service a year later. Once having a worth of US$ 125 billion, Yahoo!’s value on Friday’s closing was about $37 billion. Eight years ago, Microsoft offered US$44 billion for Yahoo!’s acquisition. The deal is expected to complete next year.

File photo of Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer, 2011.
Image: Magnus Höij (Flickr).

Last year, Verizon gained ownership of Huffington Post, TechCrunch, and Engadget as it purchased their owner America Online (AOL) for US$4.4 billion. Acquisition of Yahoo! means Verizon would own micro-blogging website Tumblr which was purchased by Yahoo! under ex-Google employee and Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer in 2013. Tumblr was formed by school dropout David Karp in 2007. Verizon would also own photo sharing site Flickr, acquired by Yahoo! in 2005.

Yahoo! received bids from the owner of The Daily Mail as well as from AT&T — another American telecom giant. After handing over ownership to Verizon, Yahoo! would be selling about 3,000 patents at auction.

Though Mayer has expressed she would like to remain the CEO, CNBC reported Verizon CEO Marni Walden is yet to decide the leadership team. Mayer said it was a big day for Yahoo!.

This acquisition would end Yahoo!’s 20 years as an independent company and an early-emerging company in Silicon Valley, California. The company started as “Jerry and David’s Guide To The World Wide Web” in 1994, by Jerry Yang and David Filo based at Stanford University.



Sources[]

External link[]

Bookmark-new.svg

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

July 10, 2012

\’Imagine a world without free knowledge\’, in Russia

‘Imagine a world without free knowledge’, in Russia

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Tuesday, July 10, 2012

Wikimedia-logo.svg This article mentions the Wikimedia Foundation, one of its projects, or people related to it. Wikinews is a project of the Wikimedia Foundation.
Russia
Related stories
Location of Russia

A map showing the location of Russia

More information on Russia:
  • Russia
  • Culture
  • Demographics
  • Economy
  • Geography
  • History
  • Politics

Screenshot of the blacked-out Russian-language version of Wikipedia. Using wordplay on the Wikipedia slogan, it states:

Imagine a world without free knowledge.”

Access to the Russian-language Wikipedia is disabled across almost all its pages today, due to the Russian parliament, the Duma, debating amendments to the law “About information” which may lead to censorship of Runet through blacklisting and filtering of internet sites.

The proposed bill aims to creating a blacklist of internet sites alleged to host child pornography, drug related material, extremist material and other content illegal in the country. It also proposed several other changes in the law, including holding providers of telecommunication services liable for failing to protect children.

Critics, including Google, Yahoo, search engine Yandex and social networking site Vkontakte noted that as-written the legislation contained many technical faults likely to negatively impact legitimate internet use. In protest, the Russian Wikipedia community decided upon a near-total blackout of contents on July 10. The blackout banner includes the text: “Imagine a world without free knowledge”, and summarises the details of the bill. Readers are warned that articles, such as Suicide, may be considered “harmful” due to ambiguity in the proposed legislation, risking a block of the entire website by Russia-based Internet providers.

Later in the day, the popular blogging platform LiveJournal issued a statement similarly opposed to the legislation: “[…Livejournal] considers the introduction of any restrictions on freedom of expression and information in the Internet to be unacceptable.”

The announcement by the Russian Wikimedia community states:

Wikipedia in Russian will be closed on July 10th because of the Russian parliament’s debate on amendments to the law «About information» that could create real censorship of the internet — a blacklisting and filtering of internet sites.

Supporters of the law proposed say that it is aimed only at widely prohibited content such as child pornography and «information like this», but conditions for determining the content falling under this law will create a thing like the «great Chinese firewall». The existing Russian law’s practice shows the high possibility of the worst scenario, in which access to Wikipedia soon will be closed in the country.

On July 11 the second reading of the law in the State Duma will take place. The law will come into force after the third reading, for which a date has not yet been set.

HAVE YOUR SAY
Wikinews commentary.svg
Do you think Wikipedia should engage in this sort of advocacy?
Add or view comments

In January, the English-language Wikipedia ran a similar ‘blackout protest’ for 24 hours, protesting US anti-piracy laws the Stop Online Piracy Act and PROTECT IP Act (PIPA). That action resulted in those laws being reconsidered. An earlier blackout, in October last year, saw the Italian Wikipedia community successfully oppose other Internet censorship legislation.

Speaking to Wikinews in January, the Wikimedia Foundation’s chief executive, Sue Gardner, explained “[t]he Wikimedia movement does not have a lot of experience with advocacy, and probably mistakes will get made. At this time the Wikimedia Foundation doesn’t have any plans to develop policy governing protests or advocacy work. But, I think it probably does make sense for the Foundation to create venues for these discussions”.

Related news

Sister links

  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg Russian State Duma Bill 89417-6

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

March 21, 2012

Savage on Santorum on Savage

Savage on Santorum on Savage – Wikinews, the free news source

Savage on Santorum on Savage

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, March 21, 2012

In an interview Monday, candidate for the 2012 Republican Party presidential nomination Rick Santorum criticized advice columnist Dan Savage and said he would pray for him. In return, Savage pointed out Santorum’s controversial social conservatism positions. Santorum’s disagreement with Savage stems from the santorum neologism coined in Savage’s column Savage Love in response to comments made by former Pennsylvania Senator Santorum about homosexuality; Savage’s readers voted to define santorum as: “the frothy mixture of lube and fecal matter that is sometimes the byproduct of anal sex.”

Dan Savage
Dan Savage
Image: Dan Savage (2005).
Rick Santorum
Rick Santorum
Image: Gage Skidmore (2011).
The santorum neologism was coined in Dan Savage’s column Savage Love in 2003 based on the last name of Rick Santorum.
Cquote1.svg He obviously has some serious issues. Cquote2.svg

—Rick Santorum

Former Senator Santorum was interviewed Monday by the RealClearPolitics website RealClearReligion and was asked, “If you happen to run into Dan Savage, what would you say to him?” The Republican presidential nomination candidate replied, “I would tell him that I’m praying for him. He obviously has some serious issues. You look at someone like that who can say and do the things that he’s doing and you just pray for him and hopefully he can find peace.”

This is not the first instance where Santorum has commented publicly about Dan Savage. ThinkProgress called his most recent comments on Savage an “improvement”, and noted that Santorum previously stated Savage is “below the dignity of anybody”.

Mother Jones magazine contacted Savage for a response to Santorum’s comments. Savage emphasized Santorum’s controversial positions on social issues in contrast to his “dirty joke”, replying, “Rick Santorum thinks that women who have been raped should be compelled—by force of law—to carry the babies of their rapists to term, he thinks birth control should be illegal, he wants to prosecute pornographers, etc., etc., basically the guy wants to be president so that he can micromanage the sex lives of all Americans…and I’m the one with issues? Because I made a dirty joke at his expense eight or nine years ago and it stuck? I’m the one with issues?”

Cquote1.svg The man who wants to get his hands on the nuclear football so he can micromanage your sex life … thinks I have issues. That’s hilarious. Cquote2.svg

—Dan Savage

Savage concluded, “Rick can pray for me. I’ll gay for him. And we can call it even.”

In a subsequent piece posted to the website of the Seattle, Washington paper The Stranger, Savage elaborated on his response to Santorum. He commented, “The man who wants to get his hands on the nuclear football so he can micromanage your sex life … thinks I have issues. That’s hilarious.”

In a 2003 interview with the Associated Press, Rick Santorum compared legalizing same-sex marriage in the United States to supporting bestiality. Readers of the Savage Love advice column selected a new definition for the Senator’s last name, and Savage created a website SpreadingSantorum.com to promulgate the spread of the phenomenon. The term became a prominent result in searches online, and gained dominance on Web search engines including Google, Bing, and Yahoo!.

Rick Santorum himself has acknowledged and discussed the existence and prevalence of the santorum neologism phenomenon; he was quoted by The Canadian Press on his assessment of Google’s response: “To have a business allow that type of filth to be purveyed through their website or through their system is something that they say they can’t handle. I suspect that’s not true.” Santorum criticized the response of the press to the phenomenon in a 2011 radio interview, saying, “It’s offensive beyond, you know, anything that any public figure or anybody in America should tolerate, and the mainstream media laughs about it.”



Related news

Sister links

  • Wiktionary-logo.svg santorum

Sources

External links

  • Spreading Santorum, website created to promulgate redefinition of Rick Santorum’s last name
Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

March 15, 2012

Wikinews interviews New York bar owner on Santorum cocktail

Wikinews interviews New York bar owner on Santorum cocktail

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, March 15, 2012

Related news
Interviews on Wikinews
Collaborate!
  • Newsroom
  • Style Guide – how to write
  • Content Guide – what to write

Wikinews interviewed one of the owners of a New York City bar about a popular new politically-themed cocktail drink called Santorum. The beverage was inspired by the santorum neologism coined in advice columnist Dan Savage’s column Savage Love in response to comments made by former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum about homosexuality; Savage’s readers voted to define santorum as: “the frothy mixture of lube and fecal matter that is sometimes the byproduct of anal sex.”

Background

The santorum neologism has inspired satirical forms of parody, including this political cartoon by Saturday Morning Breakfast Cereal webcomic artist Zach Weiner. 2012.
Image: Zach Weiner.

The Pacific Standard bar is located in Brooklyn, New York, and is co-owned by Jonathan M. Stan and John-Christian G. Rauschenberg. Stan commented on the creation of the Santorum cocktail, “When he was winning in the polls, I thought, ‘OK, I’ll do a Santorum’.” Regarding how long the beverage will be made available, Stan remarked to The Brooklyn Paper, “We’ll keep it around until he’s irrelevant. I hope he’s there the whole way”.

The main ingredients of the Santorum drink include vodka of an orange citrus variety, Baileys Irish Cream, and Angostura bitters. It is served in a cocktail glass and topped with Godiva chocolate flakes. The beverage is priced at US$8.00, and upon an order for it, the bartender will recount for the customer the definition of the santorum neologism.

Troy Patterson of Slate Magazine ventured over to Pacific Standard to sample the new santorum cocktail at the bar. After tasting the beverage, Patterson observed, “My Santorum was sweet but balanced, with a subtle citrus pucker”.

Cquote1.svg [The santorum neologism is] offensive beyond, you know, anything that any public figure or anybody in America should tolerate, and the mainstream media laughs about it. Cquote2.svg

—Rick Santorum

In a 2003 interview with the Associated Press, Rick Santorum compared legalizing same-sex marriage in the United States to supporting bestiality. Readers of the Savage Love advice column selected a new definition for the Senator’s last name, and Savage created a website SpreadingSantorum.com to promulgate the spread of the phenomenon. The term became a prominent result in searches online, and gained dominance on Web search engines including Google, Bing, and Yahoo!.

Rick Santorum himself has acknowledged and discussed the existence and prevalence of the santorum neologism phenomenon; he was quoted by The Canadian Press on his assessment of Google’s response: “To have a business allow that type of filth to be purveyed through their website or through their system is something that they say they can’t handle. I suspect that’s not true.” Santorum criticized the response of the press to the phenomenon in a 2011 radio interview, saying, “It’s offensive beyond, you know, anything that any public figure or anybody in America should tolerate, and the mainstream media laughs about it.”

Interview

Pacific Standard owner, Jonathan M. Stan, displays the Santorum cocktail drink as a finished product at the bar. (2012).
Image: Pacific Standard, provided by the owners.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png What inspired you to create a cocktail after the santorum neologism?

John Rauschenberg: Santorum the person has been in the news throughout the primary season, and we thought it would be interesting to try to create a delicious drink that mimicked the appearance of the Dan Savage meaning of “santorum.”

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png How did you first hear about the definition of the santorum neologism that grew out of the contest from the Savage Love advice column?

JR: We don’t really remember. It’s been around forever. Probably read about it somewhere.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png What are your thoughts about Rick Santorum’s views on gay rights?

JR: It’s not for us to take a stand on any political issues. We’ll leave that to the professionals.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Do you think it was an appropriate form of satire for Dan Savage to popularize the definition of the santorum neologism created in his advice column?

JR: We thought it was funny. Whether it is appropriate or not is another thing we leave to the pros to decide.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png When was the Santorum cocktail first created?

JR: A few months ago.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png What ingredients go in the Santorum cocktail?

JR: Bailey’s, orange vodka, bitters, and chocolate flakes.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png How is the Santorum drink made?

JR: The ingredients are shaken and/or poured into a cocktail glass. See the pictures.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Your Santorum cocktail creation has already received media coverage from publications including: The Brooklyn Paper, The New York Times, Jezebel, Metro.us, EDGE on the Net, and Instinct Magazine. Did you think when you created it that the Santorum cocktail would receive this news coverage?

JR: Not at all. We were just trying to come up with a topical and funny new cocktail for our customers to laugh about and enjoy.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png What culinary dishes would you recommend that go well with the Santorum cocktail?

JR: You’d probably be having the cocktail at dessert time, so something sweet: ice cream or pie.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Is the drink popular? How many times do you suppose you’ve served it at your establishment since its creation?

JR: The drink was mildly popular for the last few months, but of course has become a great deal more popular since getting all this publicity. We have no way to estimate how many times we’ve served it overall, but we’re now pouring around ten a night.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png What are some reactions of your patrons after seeing the availability of Santorum as a cocktail?

JR: Most people find it amusing. Some people want to demonstrate their bravery and ability to overcome their mental blocks by drinking one. A lot of people think it’s a really appealing mix of ingredients.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Has anyone come into your facility specifically because they have heard they can order the Santorum cocktail and wish to try it?

JR: Yes, especially recently.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Has the availability of the Santorum cocktail at your pub prompted any interesting political discussions amongst your staff and customers?

JR: Nothing more serious than the usual light political banter. Given our location and clientele, most of our customers are of a similar mind politically and there isn’t much disagreement.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png How long do you plan on making the Santorum cocktail available at your bar?

JR: As long as Santorum stays relevant in the news and customers are interested in ordering it.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Have you heard any feedback from Rick Santorum or the Santorum campaign about the Santorum cocktail?

JR: No.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Were you at all worried about legal repercussions from creating a cocktail inspired by the santorum neologism?

JR: Not at all. There’s nothing legally wrong with it.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Have you created any other drinks named after politicians?

JR: No.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png What are your thoughts about the satirical definition for the neologism “romney” (“to defecate in terror”) created by Jack Shepler inspired by an incident involving Mitt Romney’s family dog?

JR: We don’t really have any.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Do you think you might create a new cocktail based on this “romney” neologism?

JR: Not based on that definition. If we ever came up with a “romney” cocktail it’d probably be something different. Maybe something incredibly bland.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Comedy hosts Jon Stewart of The Daily Show and Stephen Colbert of The Colbert Report have each reported on the santorum neologism repeatedly on their satirical news programs. If asked to do so, would you be willing to appear on these programs to mix up a special Santorum cocktail for the host?

JR: Absolutely.

Gallery



Related news

Sister links

  • Wiktionary-logo.svg santorum

Sources

Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.
Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

External links

  • Spreading Santorum, website created to promulgate redefinition of Rick Santorum’s last name
Prior media coverage discussed in interview
Bookmark-new.svg


Wikinews
This article is a featured article. It is considered one of the best works of the Wikinews community. See Wikinews:Featured articles for more information.

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 14, 2012

Santorum neologism spreads to Romney

Santorum neologism spreads to Romney – Wikinews, the free news source

Santorum neologism spreads to Romney

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Tuesday, February 14, 2012

Internet
Related stories
  • Supreme Court of Sweden agrees to try Bildkonst Upphovsrätt i Sverige versus Wikimedia Sverige
  • Wikinews interviews Asaf Bartov, Head of Wikimedia Grants Program and Global South Partnerships
  • Google shuts down Google News Spain
  • Wikinews interviews Mario J. Lucero and Isabel Ruiz of Heaven Sent Gaming
  • Parts of internet break as ‘512k day’ reached by routers

Graphical map of the Internet
More information at Wikipedia:
  • Internet portal
  • Internet
  • History of the Internet
  • Internet censorship
  • Internet Protocol
  • World Wide Web

A new website SpreadingRomney.com now appears prominently among Internet search results for Mitt Romney’s last name and defines romney as: “to defecate in terror”. Spreading Romney was inspired by the santorum neologism coined in advice columnist Dan Savage’s column Savage Love in response to comments made by former Pennsylvania Senator Rick Santorum about homosexuality; Savage’s readers voted to define santorum as: “the frothy mixture of lube and fecal matter that is sometimes the byproduct of anal sex.”

While defining romney as a verb, the word “terror” in the definition given at SpreadingRomney.com links to an article that appeared January 5 in The Huffington Post titled “Mitt Romney’s Dog Incident Comes Back To Haunt Him”. The article describes a 1983 incident where Romney was reported to have affixed his family’s pet Irish setter named Seamus to the roof of their vehicle for 12 hours while on a car trip to Canada; press coverage of the matter recounted how the animal let loose its bowels due to a fear response during the experience.

Similar to online searches leading to the santorum neologism website originally created by Dan Savage, SpreadingSantorum.com, queries for Romney yielding top search results for SpreadingRomney.com are not limited only to Google but extend to other search engines including Bing as well.

Cquote1.svg I don’t recall seeing it recently, so it appears to be a new gain. Cquote2.svg

Danny Sullivan

MSNBC quoted search engine expert Danny Sullivan, who observed that the website had likely risen of late in search results: “I don’t recall seeing it recently, so it appears to be a new gain.”

The Atlantic reported that as of yesterday, SpreadingRomney.com had received 3,416 like button clicks from Facebook and 1,261 posts on Twitter. The site appeared third in a Google search for Romney, directly below the former Massachusetts Governor’s Wikipedia page.

In a 2003 interview with the Associated Press, Rick Santorum compared legalizing same-sex marriage in the United States to supporting bestiality. Readers of the Savage Love advice column selected a new definition for the Senator’s last name, and Savage created a website SpreadingSantorum.com to promulgate the spread of the phenomenon. The term became a prominent result in searches online, and gained dominance on Web search engines including Google, Bing, and Yahoo!.

Cquote1.svg [The santorum neologism is] offensive beyond, you know, anything that any public figure or anybody in America should tolerate, and the mainstream media laughs about it. Cquote2.svg

—Rick Santorum

Rick Santorum himself has acknowledged and discussed the existence and prevalence of the santorum neologism phenomenon; he was quoted by The Canadian Press on his assessment of Google’s response: “To have a business allow that type of filth to be purveyed through their website or through their system is something that they say they can’t handle. I suspect that’s not true.” Santorum criticized the response of the press to the phenomenon in a 2011 radio interview, saying, “It’s offensive beyond, you know, anything that any public figure or anybody in America should tolerate, and the mainstream media laughs about it.”

The company Go Daddy manages the domain name for the website SpreadingRomney.com; the site was registered by an Indianapolis, Indiana-based company named Ayokay LLC which was formed on January 1. The website reportedly started operating on January 10. Rachel Maddow commented upon it on January 12 on her program The Rachel Maddow Show. The founder of SpreadingRomney.com, Jack Shepler, informed Sullivan that he holds no ties to any political campaign group and formed the website out of a comedic motivation.

New York Magazine noted that there may be another neologism this time derived from the last name of presidential candidate Newt Gingrich; linking to an established website for SpreadingGingrich.com. That site is currently asking visitors to submit suggestions for a new definition of gingrich.



Related news

Sister links

  • Wiktionary-logo.svg santorum

Sources

External links

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 4, 2010

Monster.com aquires Yahoo\’s HotJobs service for $225 million

Monster.com aquires Yahoo’s HotJobs service for $225 million

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, February 4, 2010

Internet
Related stories
  • Supreme Court of Sweden agrees to try Bildkonst Upphovsrätt i Sverige versus Wikimedia Sverige
  • Wikinews interviews Asaf Bartov, Head of Wikimedia Grants Program and Global South Partnerships
  • Google shuts down Google News Spain
  • Wikinews interviews Mario J. Lucero and Isabel Ruiz of Heaven Sent Gaming
  • Parts of internet break as ‘512k day’ reached by routers

Graphical map of the Internet
More information at Wikipedia:
  • Internet portal
  • Internet
  • History of the Internet
  • Internet censorship
  • Internet Protocol
  • World Wide Web

The Yahoo logo.

Yahoo announced plans to sell its HotJobs employment search service to Monster Worldwide for $225m, the companies said yesterday. Monster currently controls one third of online jobs postings in the United States. The two companies also struck a three-year agreement under which Monster will provide career and job content for the Internet giant’s homepage in the U.S. and Canada.

Terms of the deal include Monster being paid for providing job-related postings for Yahoo’s homepage in the US and Canada for three years and other expressions of interest. Yahoo, who bought HotJobs in 2001 for $436 million, last month agreed to sell email provider Zimbra to VMWare Inc. for an undisclosed amount, having it acquired for $350 million two years ago.

Cquote1.svg “HotJobs with its significant customer base plus the traffic agreement are an ideal complement to Monster’s innovative recruitment solutions and global reach,” Cquote2.svg

—Sal Iannuzzi

“HotJobs with its significant customer base plus the traffic agreement are an ideal complement to Monster’s innovative recruitment solutions and global reach,” said Sal Iannuzzi, chairman, CEO and president of Monster Worldwide. “Monster will be able to offer its employers a significantly larger pool of candidates across diverse geographies and industries,” the company said in a statement.

Buying Yahoo out of the online recruitment business leaves Monster with only one major competitor, Careerbuilder.com. “We have substantially added quality traffic, while substantially increasing our customer base,” he added.

HotJobs averaged 12.6 million unique visitors a month, according to Media Metrics comScore. HotJobs generates annual revenue of about $100 million while Monster’s revenue totalled $905 million in 2009. Alexa.com rates HotJobs at rank 3 while Monster.com at rank 531.


== Sources ==

*Mike Swift. “Yahoo to sell HotJobs employment service to Monster for $225 million” — Mercury News, 3 February, 2010

*Nick Zieminski and Alexei Oreskovic. “Monster to pay $225 million for Yahoo’s HotJobs site” — Reuters, 3 February, 2010


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

March 9, 2009

Wolfram Research’s new product Alpha to compete with Google and Wikipedia

Wolfram Research’s new product Alpha to compete with Google and Wikipedia

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, March 9, 2009

Internet
Related stories

Graphical map of the Internet
More information at Wikipedia:
  • Internet portal
  • Internet
  • History of the Internet
  • Internet censorship
  • Internet Protocol
  • World Wide Web

Wolfram Research Inc., makers of Mathematica and A New Kind of Science, have released a limited alpha of their new web service Wolfram Alpha. Wolfram Alpha is described by CEO Stephen Wolfram as a “computational knowledge engine.” Unlike Google, Yahoo! and other traditional web search engines that rely on statistical methods for retrieving online documents, Wolfram Alpha answers factual questions in the way that Wikipedia does, except it relies on analytical methods instead of human-generated documents.

Although the product is still in a limited release some details about its operation and design have been revealed by Wolfram on his blog, and by Nova Spivack who recently interviewed Wolfram about Wolfram Alpha. The product is available on the Web as a single search box reminiscent of Google’s main search page. The search queries can be entered in natural language and the natural language system will parse the query and use models of knowledge (ontologies) and human-curated data to return an answer including graphs and other representations. The ontologies and data are managed by Wolfram employees who must input new ontologies and data by hand or, occasionally, with the assistance of programmatic tools. It is expected that an Application Programming Interface (API) will eventually be available, although it is not known what the API will be used for.

Unlike traditional search engines Wolfram Alpha does not search online documents, and thus does not return answers to “fuzzy” questions, such as opinion or advice. Instead, the scope of answers is limited to the knowledge that has already been modeled and encoded in the ontologies and the associated data. In this way the system can generate knowledge that was previously unknown. It is thought that while Wolfram will concentrate on scientific and technical information the system may eventually be able to answer questions in other domains, such as stock information, geography and history. In theory, any question with a factual answer could be answered by Wolfram Alpha.



Sources

External links

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 3, 2009

Yahoo announces closure of Briefcase

Yahoo announces closure of Briefcase – Wikinews, the free news source

Yahoo announces closure of Briefcase

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Tuesday, February 3, 2009

Yahoo!’s headquarters in Sunnyvale, California
Image: Coolcaesar.

Yahoo!’sNASDAQ: YHOO Briefcase service is to be closed after ten years.

The directory-cum-internet portal’s Briefcase, which offers 30mb of online storage of files up to 5mb, is to be shut down on March 30. Data not retrieved before then will be deleted.

Usage of the service has declined in recent years and has been superseded by other companies’ offers. Google has plans for a GDrive service, whilst Microsoft’s Live Mesh is now in beta. Yahoo! Mail now has unlimited storage, as do paid accounts with the Yahoo!-owned photo- and video-sharing site Flickr. A spokesperson for Yahoo! said that “[d]iscontinuing the service will allow us to focus our efforts on more broadly used products”.

Yahoo has been losing market value since Microsoft’s deal to buy the company fell through in May 2008 and the company has reduced staff. Yahoo! still dominates the market for display adverts but this market is shrinking against targeted search adverts, where Google dominates.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 18, 2008

Yahoo! to purge personal data after 3 months

Filed under: Archived,Google,Internet,Microsoft,Yahoo — admin @ 5:00 am

Yahoo! to purge personal data after 3 months

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, December 18, 2008

Internet
Related stories

Graphical map of the Internet
More information at Wikipedia:
  • Internet portal
  • Internet
  • History of the Internet
  • Internet censorship
  • Internet Protocol
  • World Wide Web
Yahoo Logo.gif

Internet giant Yahoo! announced on Wednesday that by January 2009 it will begin purging personal data collected when users access its search page at the 3 month mark, a far shorter time period than any of its search engine rivals such as Google, which retains personal data for 9 months, down from 18 months as of September, and Microsoft, which retains data for an 18 month period, though Microsoft has stated support for a six month industry standard. Prior to the announcement, Yahoo purged data at 13 months.

Just three years ago, the policy of all three search engines was to keep collected private data permanently, on the basis that it was necessary in order for them to run their services. However, in the wake of substantial public pressure, private advocacy and indications from regulators that if the industry did not police itself, it would be imposed upon them, all three companies instituted data protection schemes. Calls for shortening the time period before data is removed or obscured soon began and have grown in pitch.

Anne Toth, Yahoo’s vice president of policy and head of privacy stated that “we want to take the issue of data retention off the table.”

The move puts pressure on Google and Microsoft to follow suit, in a climate where European Union regulators have pushed for legislation, private advocacy groups are planning such a push in the U.S., and where Congress has raised questions about the extent Internet tracking of private data by telecommunications companies is being used to target advertising based on personal information.

Despite Yahoo’s data policy being more restrictive than that of Google’s or Microsoft’s, personal data will not be destroyed entirely but will by “anonymized”—hidden in various ways, including: deleting the final eight bits of a user’s IP address; changing the user’s Yahoo! ID to a one-way, secret, hash code and deleting one half of the identifier created; a similar hash obscuring of all cookie identifiers; and will filter certain types of unique personal identifiers such as credit card and social security numbers. Additionally, Yahoo indicates that it will purge information on page views, ad views, page clicks and ad clicks.

In a press release, Massachusetts Democrat Edward J. Markey, chairman of the House Energy Subcommittee on Telecommunications and the Internet, praised the restriction, and stated, “I urge other leading online companies to match or beat the commitments announced by Yahoo.”



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

May 4, 2008

Microsoft drops bid for Yahoo

Filed under: Archived,Computing,Economy and business,Microsoft,Yahoo — admin @ 5:00 am

Microsoft drops bid for Yahoo – Wikinews, the free news source

Microsoft drops bid for Yahoo

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, May 4, 2008

Microsoft logo12.png

Microsoft has announced it is dropping its bid to acquire one of their Internet competitors, Yahoo!, after a three-month courting effort by Microsoft.

Microsoft chief executive officer, Steve Ballmer
Image: Martin Olsson.

Microsoft chief executive officer, Steve Ballmer notified Yahoo! chief executive officer, chairman and co-founder, Jerry Yang via a letter that Microsoft was dropping their bid for the Sunnyvale, California based search engine giant.

In a press release from Microsoft, Ballmer said, “Despite our best efforts, including raising our bid by roughly US$5 billion, Yahoo! has not moved toward accepting our offer. After careful consideration, we believe the economics demanded by Yahoo! do not make sense for us, and it is in the best interests of Microsoft stockholders, employees and other stakeholders to withdraw our proposal”.

Microsoft withdrew its bid effort after raising their bid from $44.6 billion to $47.5 billion, which works out at $33 per share. However, Yahoo! were waiting for a bid of around $53 billion, which was more than Microsoft were willing to pay.

Microsoft had previously wanted to takeover Yahoo! in-order to compete with Google, the market leader in online advertising. The online advertising market was worth $40 billion in 2007 and will rise to an expected $80 billion in 2010.

Some observers, however, are speculating that the bid withdrawal could just be another tactic in their attempt to acquire Yahoo!. Yahoo shares have dropped since the bid was pulled out.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
Older Posts »

Powered by WordPress