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May 9, 2016

Political columnist apologises after mocking disabled broadcaster Andrew Marr

Political columnist apologises after mocking disabled broadcaster Andrew Marr

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Monday, May 9, 2016

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Quentin Letts photographed in 2009
Image: Steve Punter.

Quentin Letts, a political columnist and sketch writer has publicly apologized after he mocked disabled broadcaster Andrew Marr. Letts was reviewing former BBC business editor Robert Peston‘s new ITV television show for The Daily Mail when he made the comments. In his column he said that Marr, who suffered a stroke in 2013, was like “Captain-Hop-Along, growling away on BBC One, throwing his arm about like a tipsy conductor”.

Letts posted an apology on his Twitter page after a critical article by Roy Greenslade, which appeared in The Guardian. Greenslade said “I don’t want to come off all namby-pamby. I understand that no-one should be beyond criticism and that Letts was exercising his right to press freedom. But really Quentin, that was a graceless remark.”

The apology tweet read, “I fear my sketch reference to the admirable Marr today was horrid. Apologies to all concern and upset”. Letts also replied directly to Greenslade, who updated his article. Letts said “Perhaps I should have been more cautious but I hope that Andrew will forgive it. He has been equally teasing about himself in my company. I admire him”. He also added that he believes that Marr’s stroke had “made him more watchable than he was beforehand”.

Criticism also came from Marr’s wife and The Stroke Association. Eleven complaints were filed in relation to the comments to the Independent Press Standards Organisation according to a BBC statement.

Andrew Marr drew in 1.6 million viewers significantly more than Peston’s debut, with 166,000 viewers tuning in. Peston left the BBC to become ITV’s political editor in 2015.



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April 20, 2016

Charges against Sally Faulkner and 60 Minutes news crew dropped in Lebanon abduction case

Charges against Sally Faulkner and 60 Minutes news crew dropped in Lebanon abduction case

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Wednesday, April 20, 2016

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Brisbane mother Sally Faulkner and the crew of Australian current affairs program 60 Minutes are free to leave Lebanon after kidnapping charges against them were today dropped.

Faulkner reportedly made a deal to secure her release, accepting her estranged husband Ali el-Amine’s custody of her two children. This comes after she allegedly hired professionals to abduct the children in Beirut on April 7 while in the care of their Lebanese grandmother.

While personal charges against Australian journalist Tara Brown, her three crew members and Faulkner have been dropped, they still face criminal charges in Lebanon of kidnapping and being members of a criminal gang. If the state chooses to pursue these charges, it could require the accused to return to answer them.

Channel Nine Middle East correspondent Tom Steinfort said that Nine’s lawyers have confirmed bail has been paid for the TV crew, and that they will fly to Australia from Beirut tonight.

The deal between El-Amine and Channel Nine resulted in a significant financial settlement, Fairfax Media reports.

El-Amine is still pursuing charges carrying a maximum 20-year sentence against the crew of Child Abduction Recovery International (CARI) who allegedly conducted the operation.

Adam Whittington of CARI, along with several others involved in the alleged kidnapping, remained in custody. Their lawyers claimed positive developments in the case, saying “everyone will take advantage of the deal.”

In remarks on Monday to News Corp Australia, Whittington said he has receipts for A$115,000 paid directly by the Nine Network to fund the operation.

According to Steinfort, in dropping charges against the 60 Minutes crew, El-Amine told Judge Rami Abdullah the reporters were ‘just doing their job’, and later joked to Steinfort about his relationship with Channel Nine.



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April 16, 2016

Lebanon child abduction charges against mother may be dropped in exchange for custody

Lebanon child abduction charges against mother may be dropped in exchange for custody

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Saturday, April 16, 2016

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Sally Faulkner, who allegedly hired professionals to snatch her children from Beirut last week, was offered kidnapping charges to be dropped if she relinquishes custody of her children, according to reports yesterday. This is on the condition she will have full access rights, but must never take the children back to Australia.

The children’s father and Faulkner’s estranged husband, Ali el-Amien, took the children to Lebanon on holiday in 2014 and never returned them to their Brisbane home. Faulkner was granted sole custody of the children, Lahela and Noah, by the Family Court of Australia in December of last year. Faulkner’s lawyer, Ghassan Moghabghab, said Lebanese religious authorities had granted the father full custody.

In remarks to Australian news service ABC News, Moghabghab said money supplied by the Australian current affairs program 60 Minutes was paid to Child Abduction Recovery International, who conducted the abduction last week.

Mr Moghabghab has declined to make further statements, saying it may influence legal negotiations. The Nine Network has also refused to comment on allegations of giving A$115,000 to Faulkner either as payment for rights to the story or to fund the abduction.

The 60 Minutes news crew was remanded in custody beside Faulkner on Wednesday. They face potential jail time of up to 20 years. The crew’s charges include kidnapping, physical assault, withholding information and forming an association to commit a crime against a person. The case has been adjourned until Monday. Judge Rami Abdullah says there is “no chance” of the charges being dropped against the 60 Minutes crew.

According to Child Recovery Australia, less than half of Australian children abducted by a parent are returned through legal means. Lebanon isn’t party to the Hague Convention on the Civil Aspects of International Child Abduction.

Australian Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull says Australia is making every effort to support the crew and Faulkner, but the legal jurisdiction of Lebanon has to be respected.



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October 9, 2015

Calicut Review is conducting an English essay writing competition for the General public

Filed under: Disputed,India,Journalism,Magazines,Media,Review — admin @ 5:00 am

Calicut Review is conducting an English essay writing competition for the General public

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Friday, October 9, 2015

Kozhikode: Calicut Review conducts an essay writing competition in English for the public based on 15 contemporary topics listed in the website calicutreview.com/essays. Writers may send their articles based on any one of the selected topics to this address essays2015[at]calicutreview[dot]com before 30th October. The article should not be more than 10 pages. The awards will be distributed in a function to be held at Calicut on 30th November.

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September 10, 2015

Investigators blame pilot error for deadly jet crash in Boston

Investigators blame pilot error for deadly jet crash in Boston

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Thursday, September 10, 2015

The US federal National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) yesterday concluded a “series of errors” by flight crew caused a business jet crash near Boston, Massachusetts last year. Seven were killed when the Gulfstream IV overran a runway.

Cquote1.svg I can’t stop it Cquote2.svg

—Pilot de Vries, seconds from impact

The NTSB found the pilots failed to conduct preflight checks, mistakenly took off with flight control systems locked in position, and then failed to abort takeoff until too late. Manufacturer Gulfstream was criticised for an inadequate safety system; the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) was accused of failing to properly check the system before certifying the aircraft.

On the evening of May 31 the passengers and crew were returning from Hanscom Field to Atlanta International Airport. Pilot Bauke “Mike” de Vries and co-pilot James McDowell each had thousands of hours’ experience, and had flown together for years. They skipped over preflight checks; the NTSB found this was routine for the pair.

The plane set off with the gust lock engaged. This system, which is intended to be disconnected before engine startup, locks various flight control surfaces in position on the ground. Unable to takeoff, it overshot the runway, crashing through airport equipment and a fence, before landing in a watery ravine and bursting into flames. Nobody survived.

A US Government Gulstream IV, from file.
Image: US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

De Vries says several times “lock is on” on the voice recording, adding “I can’t stop it” moments before the crash. Gulfstream had installed a mechanism to prevent the throttle fully moving when gust lock was engaged, to give pilots a clear early warning something was amiss.

The NTSB found the throttle could still be pushed far enough to reach takeoff speed. The FAA had certified the system based on technical drawings. The NTSB said the FAA process was “inadequate” because there were no “engineering certification tests or analysis[…] to verify that the system had met its regulatory requirements.” Gulfstream say they are working with the FAA to rectify the issue.

The NTSB says it took ten seconds from noticing the problem before the crew began braking and another four seconds to power down the engines. The NTSB believes doing both within eleven seconds would have brought the flight to a halt on the runway.

The lock was applied upon landing six hours earlier. The flight was carrying four passengers, including entrepreneur and philanthropist Lewis Katz, back from a fundraiser. The seventh fatality was a flight attendant. Katz had co-engineered an $88 million takeover deal for the Philadelphia Inquirer four days earlier.

The Katz family later sold his stake in the paper to a business partner. Katz had hoped to boost the paper’s reputation.

“Complacency does not have a place in the cockpit of any aircraft”, NTSB Vice Chairman Bella Dinh-Zarr said. The probe found skipped checks on 98% of the prior 175 flights the pilots undertook together. “If you’re acting that way, you are just fooling yourself,” said NTSB member Robert Sumwalt, who has 32 years of commercial flight experience.


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Investigators blame pilot error for deadly jet crash near Boston

Investigators blame pilot error for deadly jet crash near Boston

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Thursday, September 10, 2015

Aviation

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The US federal National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) yesterday concluded a “series of errors” by flight crew caused a business jet crash near Boston, Massachusetts last year. Seven were killed when the Gulfstream IV overran a runway.

Cquote1.svg I can’t stop it Cquote2.svg

—Pilot de Vries, seconds from impact

The NTSB found the pilots failed to conduct preflight checks, mistakenly took off with flight control systems locked in position, and then failed to abort takeoff until too late. Manufacturer Gulfstream was criticised for an inadequate safety system; the US Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) was accused of failing to properly check the system before certifying the aircraft.

On the evening of May 31 the passengers and crew were returning from Hanscom Field to Atlanta International Airport. Pilot Bauke “Mike” de Vries and co-pilot James McDowell each had thousands of hours’ experience, and had flown together for years. They skipped over preflight checks; the NTSB found this was routine for the pair.

The plane set off with the gust lock engaged. This system, which is intended to be disconnected before engine startup, locks various flight control surfaces in position on the ground. Unable to takeoff, it overshot the runway, crashing through airport equipment and a fence, before landing in a watery ravine and bursting into flames. Nobody survived.

A US Government Gulstream IV, from file.
Image: US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

De Vries says several times “lock is on” on the voice recording, adding “I can’t stop it” moments before the crash. Gulfstream had installed a mechanism to prevent the throttle fully moving when gust lock was engaged, to give pilots a clear early warning something was amiss.

The NTSB found the throttle could still be pushed far enough to reach takeoff speed. The FAA had certified the system based on technical drawings. The NTSB said the FAA process was “inadequate” because there were no “engineering certification tests or analysis[…] to verify that the system had met its regulatory requirements.” Gulfstream say they are working with the FAA to rectify the issue.

The NTSB says it took ten seconds from noticing the problem before the crew began braking and another four seconds to power down the engines. The NTSB believes doing both within eleven seconds would have brought the flight to a halt on the runway.

The lock was applied upon landing six hours earlier. The flight was carrying four passengers, including entrepreneur and philanthropist Lewis Katz, back from a fundraiser. The seventh fatality was a flight attendant. Katz had co-engineered an $88 million takeover deal for the Philadelphia Inquirer four days earlier.

The Katz family later sold his stake in the paper to a business partner. Katz had hoped to boost the paper’s reputation.

“Complacency does not have a place in the cockpit of any aircraft”, NTSB Vice Chairman Bella Dinh-Zarr said. The probe found skipped checks on 98% of the prior 175 flights the pilots undertook together. “If you’re acting that way, you are just fooling yourself,” said NTSB member Robert Sumwalt, who has 32 years of commercial flight experience.


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August 28, 2015

Foreign journalists reporting restrictions revoked by Indonesian government

Foreign journalists reporting restrictions revoked by Indonesian government

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Friday, August 28, 2015

Indonesian Home Affairs Minister Tjahjo Kumolo, has revoked and apologized for the proposal of plans for more stringent regulations placed on foreign journalists due to public disgruntle. New regulations would require foreign journalists to provide reports to appropriate government authorities, and the National Intelligence Agency (BIN), detailing any work in Indonesia.

These new regulations were issued to the entire island on Wednesday in an attempt for the Foreign Ministry to administer and oversee all activity of journalists. Foreign journalists and television crews, activists and non-government organisations would have been among those affected by the new changes of policy.

The Alliance of Independent Journalists Indonesia (AJI) believed the new regulation violated the freedom of the press in Indonesia and went against the original principles of freedom of the press in Indonesia and West Papua.

“The policy contradicts the pledge that President Jokowi made when he was in Papua that he would allow open access to foreign journalists,” Sujarwono, AJI chairman, said.

The Jakarta Foreign Correspondents Club commented on the bid to change policies surrounding the freedom of press to be saddening as the Indonesian government claims to support freedom of speech and human rights, taking a democratic government stance.



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August 26, 2015

North Carolina reporter, cameraman killed on live TV, shooter commits suicide

North Carolina reporter, cameraman killed on live TV, shooter commits suicide

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Wednesday, August 26, 2015

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Two members of a news crew for Roanoke, North Carolina news station WDBJ were shot and killed on live television Wednesday morning. The suspect, a former reporter for the news station, later shot himself after a manhunt that lasted several hours.

Reporter Alison Parker, 24, and cameraman Adam Ward, 27, were conducting an interview at a local outdoor shopping mall when a gunman opened fire at approximately 6:45 AM local time (1045 UTC). At least 15 shots were reported to have fired. Parker and Ward were killed, while the interviewee, Vicki Gardner, was transported to hospital and underwent surgery for her injuries, later being listed in stable condition.

The gunman, later identified to be 41 year-old Vester Lee Flanagan II, fled the scene afterwards. A brief police chase ensued several hours later when law enforcement attempted unsuccessfully to pull Flanagan over on Interstate 66 in Fauquier County. Shortly after that, Flanagan pulled off the road and shot himself. He was pronounced dead at a Fairfax-area hospital around 1:30 PM local time (1730 UTC).

Flanagan, who reported under the alias “Bryce Williams”, was fired by the station in 2013. According to WDBJ president and general manager Jeffrey Marks, Flanagan was “an unhappy man” and “difficult to work with”. “Eventually after many incidents of his anger coming to the fore, we dismissed him. He did not take that well.”

A video of the shooting, appeared to have been captured from the point of view of the shooter using a GoPro camera, was posted on Bryce Williams’ Twitter and Facebook pages several hours afterwards. Both pages were taken down within minutes of the video’s uploading.



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Virginia reporter, cameraman killed on live TV, shooter commits suicide

Virginia reporter, cameraman killed on live TV, shooter commits suicide

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Wednesday, August 26, 2015

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Two members of a news crew for Roanoke, Virginia station WDBJ were shot and killed on live television this morning. The suspect, a former reporter for the news station, later shot himself after a manhunt of several hours, authorities said.

Reporter Alison Parker, 24, and cameraman Adam Ward, 27, were conducting an interview at a local outdoor shopping mall when a gunman opened fire at approximately 6:45 AM local time (1045 UTC). Around fifteen shots were reported fired. Parker and Ward were killed, while the interviewee, Vicki Gardner, was transported to hospital and underwent surgery for her injuries, later listed in stable condition.

The gunman, later identified as 41 year-old Vester Lee Flanagan II, fled the scene. A brief police chase ensued several hours later when law enforcement attempted unsuccessfully to pull Flanagan over on Interstate 66 in Fauquier County. Shortly after, Flanagan pulled off the road and shot himself. He was pronounced dead at a Fairfax-area hospital around 1:30 PM local time (1730 UTC).

Flanagan, who reported under the alias “Bryce Williams”, was fired by the station in 2013. According to WDBJ president and general manager Jeffrey Marks, speaking to CBS News, Flanagan was “an unhappy man” and “difficult to work with”. “Eventually after many incidents of his anger coming to the fore, we dismissed him. He did not take that well”.

A video of the shooting, which appeared to have been captured from the point of view of the shooter, was posted on Bryce Williams’ Twitter and Facebook pages several hours afterwards.



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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Virginia reporter, cameraman killed on live TV, alleged shooter commits suicide

Virginia reporter, cameraman killed on live TV, alleged shooter commits suicide

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Wednesday, August 26, 2015

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Two members of a news crew for Roanoke, Virginia station WDBJ were shot and killed on live television this morning. The suspect, a former reporter for the news station, later shot himself after a manhunt of several hours, authorities said.

Reporter Alison Parker, 24, and cameraman Adam Ward, 27, were conducting an interview at a local outdoor shopping mall when a gunman opened fire at approximately 6:45 AM local time (1045 UTC). Around fifteen shots were reported fired. Parker and Ward were killed, while the interviewee, Vicki Gardner, was transported to hospital and underwent surgery for her injuries, later listed in stable condition.

The gunman, later identified as 41 year-old Vester Lee Flanagan II, fled the scene. A brief police chase ensued several hours later when law enforcement attempted unsuccessfully to pull Flanagan over on Interstate 66 in Fauquier County. Shortly after, Flanagan pulled off the road and shot himself. He was pronounced dead at a Fairfax-area hospital around 1:30 PM local time (1730 UTC).

Flanagan, who reported under the alias “Bryce Williams”, was fired by the station in 2013. According to WDBJ president and general manager Jeffrey Marks, speaking to CBS News, Flanagan was “an unhappy man” and “difficult to work with”. “Eventually after many incidents of his anger coming to the fore, we dismissed him. He did not take that well”.

A video of the shooting, which appeared to have been captured from the point of view of the shooter, was posted on Bryce Williams’ Twitter and Facebook pages several hours afterwards.



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