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February 5, 2013

Wikinews interviews DuckDuckGo, Opera, Mozilla, Wikimedia about DoNotTrack feature

Wikinews interviews DuckDuckGo, Opera, Mozilla, Wikimedia about DoNotTrack feature

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Tuesday, February 5, 2013

Following the introduction of a “Do Not Track” feature in modern browsers at the end of last year, Wikinews interviewed several companies and groups about the feature.

DuckDuckGo

DuckDuckGo founder Gabriel Weinberg
Image: Gabriel Weinberg.

DuckDuckGo logo
Image: Gabriel Weinberg.

DuckDuckGo office
Image: Gabriel Weinberg.

A crowdsourced search engine DuckDuckGo reviewed the feature and launched a whatisDNT microsite in December. The review involved checking answers to basic questions such as whether websites stop shaping a user profile based on users’ online actvitity or stop displaying targeted advertising. Wikinews interviewed DuckDuckGo founder Gabriel Weinberg about the microsite launch and the DuckDuckGo opinion on the feature.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png What prompted the launch of DuckDuckGo (I think it was around 2006?)?

Gabriel Weinberg: We launched on Sep 25, 2008, though I had been working on it for about a year prior. The initial motivation was to try a search engine with a different UI that did a better job of using more structured content (like from Wikipedia) and also more aggressively removed spam.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png What does the DuckDuckGo Team use instead of Gmail?

GW: We do not have company mail accounts (beyond forwarding ones), so everyone uses what they want. I personally use outlook.com right now.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png When and how did DuckDuckGo start using Perl? What influenced this decision and language choice?

GW: We started out in Perl. I picked it up at MIT where it was prevalent in the late 90s, and pretty much never looked back. It worked really well for a project like this that is text heavy and can use a lot of existing helper (CPAN) libraries.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png How did you first hear about “DoNotTrack” feature?

GW: I do not remember, but it was a long time ago :). The Do Not Track concept was proposed many years ago.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png When did you launch http://whatisDNT.com/ ? Who worked on it? What researches, tests and studies did it involve?

GW: We launched the What Is Do Not Track micro-site on Dec 19, 2012, and various members of the DuckDuckGo Team worked on it (including myself). We had been following it closely for a while, and so have been up to date on everything that is going on with it. It honestly doesn’t take any tests to prove its ineffectiveness since companies like Google tell you straight up they don’t honor it.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png A search engine that does not track users sounds good. What do you recommend users to do to not be tracked by *other* websites, such as blogs with targeted ads in sidebar?

GW: It depends on the Web browser you are using for specifics, but for each major Web browser there are tools you can install (besides DuckDuckGo extensions) to protect you in various scenarios. Some of those that are available in multiple browsers are Ghostery, DoNotTrackMe, and HTTPS Everywhere. Those help protect you while not really changing your browsing experience. Other tools do more, but do impact your browsing experience, like Tor and NoScript.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png What is your opinion of ad block tools such as AdBlockPlus and NoScript that ideally aim to block third-party js?

GW: I think they are effective at doing what they set out to do, and that is great if you are a consumer who wants that experience. However, they are not for everyone because they do degrade browsing ability, especially NoScript.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png Do you think that DoNotTarget option should exist (if consistendly adhered to)?

GW: Absolutely. My main problem with the DoNotTrack setting right now is it is misleading. If you use a major Web browser, you have this Do Not Track setting within it, but it really does next to nothing. It is a false sense of security.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png What do you see the ideal behaviour of companies when it comes to making a user’s profile? Would you like to ideally prohibit such activity entirely using legislative regulations in the long run?

GW: Yes, I think an analogy to the Do Not Call list is apt. Applying that analogy, if you were on a Do Not Track list then companies shouldn’t track you unless you explicitly ask them to, e.g. by logging in and consenting to Terms of Service. That will only happen via legislative means, however.

Opera

Flage Bratsberg, Product Counsel, Opera Software ASA

Wikinews also interviewed Haakon Flage Bratsberg, Product Counsel from Opera Software, the corporation behind Opera web browser.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png Have you heard of “Do Not Track” feature support in modern browsers? What do you think about it?

Haakon Flage Bratsberg: Opera browser for desktop computers has built in support for Do Not Track since version 12, and Opera Software participates in the W3C Tracking Protection Working Group.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png Given that not all companies respect this setting, do you feel its name misleading? Do you think it could better be named “Do Not Target” instead?

HFB: This is our major concern about the DNT functionality: Users can be given a false sense of security.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png Do you think that all websites should respect DNT users’ preferences in the long run?

HFB: In general we think websites should comply with web standards, including the current proposal for DNT.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png Would you ideally see the respect for DNT users’ preferences legally enforced?

HFB: There are obvious limitations to a pure self regulatory approach, but our hope is that self regulation will provide a sufficient good outcome in this case.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png What do you see as an ideal solution to resolve the misleading situation with DoNotTrack that you acknowledged in your response to the second question?

HFB: First of all, I personally do not think the name of DoNotTrack is misleading. However, the challenge is to have a meaningful standard that users can still be aware of the risks of that may be involved without giving a false sense of security. For example “private mode” in your browser does not prevent that your internet access provider can still keep track of what websites you visit, websites can collect information about you and so on. It only removes the trace of the sites you visited in your “browser”. Similarly, the websites can by accident or intention to be set up in a way so they do not comply with the DNT signal. There is always a risk of rouge agents.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png How do you envision the “self regulatory” approach? How would it work?

HFB: Self regulation basically means that the different stakeholders without having a legal obligation to do so, comply with a set of rules, for example an industry technical specification as W3C tracking protection standards. My take is that DNT would be a success if all major stakeholders involved in the process would comply with the standards. It is more an open question to what extent compliance to the technical standard is sufficient to comply with applicable laws in its respective country, for instance, in EU, or in the USA.

Mozilla

Wikinews contacted the Mozilla press office and got replies on behalf of the Mozilla Corporation.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png When and why did you decide to start supporting the Do Not Track feature?

Mozilla: Mozilla introduced Do Not Track in the desktop Firefox browser in January 2011, and in June 2011 Firefox for Android became the first mobile browser to support Do Not Track.
M: We support Do Not Track because we believe it is crucial to put users in control of their online experience. Do Not Track is intended to give users choice and control in a persistent, accessible way without preventing the customization and valuable advertising that powers the Web economy. We are seeking ways to give users better insight and control into the ways their personal information is collected, used, stored and shared.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png Do you think that all websites should respect DNT users’ preferences in the long run?

M: Mozilla is actively working with companies that have started to implement Do Not Track and with others who have committed to doing so. Ultimately, the goal is for all industry stakeholders to trust and respect the signal in the long run.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png The mobile Firefox attitude to DNT is …interesting! Thank you for the replies.

Wikimedia

Wikinews contacted the Wikimedia press office and got replies from Jay Walsh, senior director of communications at the Wikimedia Foundation.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png Have you heard of “Do Not Track” feature support in modern browsers? What do you think about it?

Portrait of Jay Walsh, 2008
Image: Lane Hartwell.

Jay Walsh: We’re familiar with this feature of browsers. This provides the user with the option to remove user tracking, including cookies. It disrupts a lot of the technology used by digital ad services to follow users across sites etc. For the most part any users of the Foundation’s projects would have no issues using the projects if they had Do Not Track enabled on their browser. The only issue they might have is in dismissing message banners on the projects (such as the fundraising banner) may not be completely predictable – banners may reappear after dismissing.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png Given that not all companies respect this setting, do you feel its name misleading? Do you think it could better be named “Do Not Target” instead?

JW: I’m not sure if you mean browser-making companies or web companies. Many users who activate this service are aware that by disabling user tracking they are effectively preventing ad or content targeting. We’re not a browser software organization, so it’s not a topic we spend a lot of time considering. However I think it’s safe to say that our community (who are very active, opensource and free knowledge advocates) would like the maximum amount of transparency and clarity in these kinds of features for users.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png Do you think that all websites should respect DNT users’ preferences in the long run?

JW: That’s not really a question we’re in the best position to answer. Obviously we take this kind of thing pretty seriously. From a software development perspective we would never want to confuse or frustrate a user by side-stepping a feature like do not track. We’d like all websites to honor a web user’s preferences and desire for privacy of course. Obviously we’re all looking at an Internet that relies increasingly on tracking technology to support commercial goals.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png Would you ideally see the respect for DNT users’ preferences legally enforced?

JW: That would be a question for our legal counsel. But I’m sure it’s a topic we’d want to research in more detail before reflecting on, and given that we’re a non profit and we have pretty limited resources it’s not always possible for us to have legal opinions on all matters.



Sources

Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.

External links

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

June 18, 2008

Mozilla breaks record for most software downloads in 24 hours

Wednesday, June 18, 2008

A screenshot of Firefox 3.0 (view full size image)

A screenshot of Firefox 3.0 (view full size image)

Mozilla’s new browser Firefox 3.0 has been downloaded over 8 million times in 24 hours. The Mozilla Foundation has encouraged users worldwide to download their latest browser in an attempt to enter the Guinness Book of World Records, with what is referred to as Download Day 2008. The target of five million downloads was reached long before the 24 hour period was over.

The 24 hour download session ended at 18:16 UTC on June 18th, one hour later than the original time of 17:00. This delay is due to technical problems which included the servers being overwhelmed. For a while after the specified launch time, the Firefox website linked to a download for Firefox 2.

Over 2.88 million of the downloads were from the European Union, 2.56 million from the United States, while only two of the downloads were from Chad, and one from the Falkland Islands. North Korea, Western Sahara, and French Guiana all had no downloads.

The unofficial, inaudited final number of downloads during the 24 hour marathon was 8,320,331. This figure still needs to be checked by the Guinness Book of Records for validity.

If the unofficial figure is accurate, almost 100 copies of the application were downloaded every second.

John Lilly, the CEO of Mozilla commented on the release of Firefox 3. “We’re really proud of Firefox 3 and it just shows what a committed, energized global community can do when they work together,” he said.

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
  • “Firefox 3 downloads smash 5m mark”. ZDNet, June 18, 2008
  • “Firefox 3 launch overwhelms servers”. guardian.co.uk, June 18, 2008
  • “Mozilla Releases Firefox 3 and Redefines the Web Experience”. Mozilla, June 18, 2008
  • “Firefox 3 downloads worldwide”. Mozilla, Retrieved June 18, 2008
  • John Lilly “Firefox 3’s First 24 Hours”. John_Lilly_(Mozilla), Retrieved June 19, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Mozilla breaks new record for most downloads in 24 hours

Wednesday, June 18, 2008

A screenshot of Firefox 3.0 (view full size image)

A screenshot of Firefox 3.0 (view full size image)

Mozilla’s new browser Firefox 3.0 has been downloaded over 8 million times in 24 hours. The Mozilla Foundation has encouraged users worldwide to download their latest browser in an attempt to enter the Guinness Book of World Records, with what is referred to as Download Day 2008. The target of five million downloads was reached long before the 24 hour period was over.

The 24 hour download session ended at 18:16 UTC on June 18th, one hour later than the original time of 17:00. This delay is due to technical problems which included the servers being overwhelmed. For a while after the specified launch time, the Firefox website linked to a download for Firefox 2.

Over 2.88 million of the downloads were from the European Union, 2.56 million from the United States, while only two of the downloads were from Chad, and one from the Falkland Islands. North Korea, Western Sahara, and French Guiana all had no downloads.

The unofficial, inaudited final number of downloads during the 24 hour marathon was 8,290,908. This figure still needs to be checked by the Guinness Book of Records for validity.

If the unofficial figure is accurate, almost 100 copies of the application were downloaded every second.

John Lilly, the CEO of Mozilla commented on the release of Firefox 3. “We’re really proud of Firefox 3 and it just shows what a committed, energized global community can do when they work together,” he said.

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
  • “Firefox 3 downloads smash 5m mark”. ZDNet, June 18, 2008
  • “Firefox 3 launch overwhelms servers”. guardian.co.uk, June 18, 2008
  • “Mozilla Releases Firefox 3 and Redefines the Web Experience”. Mozilla, June 18, 2008
  • “Firefox 3 downloads worldwide”. Mozilla, Retrieved June 18, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Mozilla sets record for most software downloads in 24 hours

Mozilla sets record for most software downloads in 24 hours

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, June 18, 2008

A screenshot of Firefox 3.0 (view full size image)

Mozilla’s new browser Firefox 3.0 has been downloaded over 8 million times in 24 hours. The Mozilla Foundation has encouraged users worldwide to download their latest browser in an attempt to enter the Guinness Book of World Records, with what is referred to as Download Day 2008. The target of five million downloads was reached long before the 24 hour period was over.

The 24 hour download session ended at 18:16 UTC on June 18th, one hour later than the original time of 17:00. This delay is due to technical problems which included the servers being overwhelmed. For a while after the specified launch time, the Firefox website linked to a download for Firefox 2.

Over 2.88 million of the downloads were from the European Union; 2.56 million were from the United States.

The unofficial, unaudited final number of downloads during the 24 hour marathon was 8,320,331. This figure still needs to be checked by the Guinness Book of Records for validity.

If the unofficial figure is accurate, almost 100 copies of the application were downloaded every second.

John Lilly, the CEO of Mozilla commented on the release of Firefox 3. “We’re really proud of Firefox 3 and it just shows what a committed, energized global community can do when they work together,” he said.


Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 31, 2007

Netscape navigating the World Wide Web no more

Netscape navigating the World Wide Web no more

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
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Monday, December 31, 2007

The Wikipedia home page as viewed on a Netscape browser.

AOL has decided to discontinue development of the Netscape web browser which brought surfing the Internet to the masses, until its user base began to erode during the “browser wars” of the mid-1990s and resulted in the birth of Mozilla project.

Tom Drapeau, the director of Netscape inside AOL announced on the Netscape blog that support for the recently released Netscape Navigator 9 and all of Netscape’s browsers back to version 1.0, will end because it was unable to gain market share and a low number of users that continues to dwindle. Drapeau noted, “AOL’s focus on transitioning to an ad-supported web business leaves little room for the size of investment needed to get the Netscape browser to a point many of its fans expect it to be,” and that “the success the Mozilla Foundation has had in developing critically-acclaimed products, we feel it’s the right time to end development of Netscape branded browsers, hand the reins fully to Mozilla and encourage Netscape users to adopt Firefox.”

Netscape’s origins lie at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where Netscape’s co-founders, Marc Andreessen and Eric Bina wrote their first copy of NCSA Mosaic which became the first popular web browser and opened up the web for the first time to the general public and started the rise of the Internet in everyday life.

Andreessen along with Jim Clark, the founder of Silicon Graphics, started the Mosaic Communications Corporation and released their first product Mosaic Netscape 0.9 in October 1994. A month later the company became the name it is today, the Netscape Communications Corporation to avoid legal problems from NCSA. A year later, had a successful IPO on August 9, 1995 and the stock closed the day at $75.

Netscape’s early success and virtual monopoly of the browser market was short-lived however as Microsoft viewed Netscape’s idea of a consistent browser across various operating systems a threat and quickly began development of its own browser, Internet Explorer.

This competition between Netscape and Microsoft became known as the browser wars, where both companies tried to outdo each other with their increasingly unstable browsers including: new features that did not always work, not providing bug fixes, deviating from Web standards (including the infamous blink and marquee HTML tags), program crashes and security holes.

Cquote1.svg …the success the Mozilla Foundation has had in developing critically-acclaimed products, we feel it’s the right time to end development of Netscape branded browsers, hand the reins fully to Mozilla and encourage Netscape users to adopt Firefox. Cquote2.svg

—Tom Drapeau, Netscape Director

By the end of 1997, Netscape’s glory had run out and it experienced it’s first bad quarter, which resulted in layoffs in January 1998. The new year also brought the world with the arrival of what would eventually become Mozilla and later Firefox, when Netscape decided to make the source code for their browser open source. A year later, Netscape was out of steam and was no longer an independent company but now a subsidiary of America Online.

The most recent version of the Netscape browser, Navigator 9, was for the most part was a re-skinned version of Firefox developed internally by a small group of people inside AOL. Netscape’s actual browser development division was closed back in July 2003 and the workers laid off.

However, AOL continues to run Netscape as a brand including a web portal, including a Digg-like social news aggregator which was branded as Netscape.com from June 2006 till September 2007, when it was spun off into a renamed site called Propeller. Netscape.com is now a dually branded AOL Netscape web portal, which is a duplicate of AOL.com. Netscape is also used as a brand by AOL as a low-cost dial-up Internet service provider.

Firefox’s third version is currently available as a beta and Microsoft is expected to release Internet Explorer 8 sometime in 2008.



Sources

External links



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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

July 19, 2007

Web browser Firefox increases market share in Europe

Web browser Firefox increases market share in Europe

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
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Thursday, July 19, 2007

Firefox share by continent  %
1. Oceania 28.9%
2. Europe 27.8%
3. North America 18.7%
4. South America 15.5%
5. Africa 14.7%
6. Asia 14.3%
source:XiTiMonitor

The French web survey provider XiTiMonitor reports that in their study conducted from Monday, July 2 to Sunday, July 8, 2007 on 95,827 websites, web browser Mozilla Firefox reached a 27.8% share in Europe, compared to 21.1% during the same period last year.

Firefox has its biggest market share in Slovenia and Finland where it amounts to 47.9% and 45.4%, respectively, while only 14.6% of people from the Netherlands and 15.2% of surfers in Denmark used Firefox in this survey. The share rose most in Ireland: from 24.9% to 38.6% (i.e. +13.7 points).

Microsoft’s web browser Internet Explorer remains the most used browser in Europe with a market share of 66.5%. Opera and Safari have a 3.5% and 1.7% share respectively, with other browsers at less than 1%.

Oceania remains the region with the highest usage of the freely licensed and open source software browser Firefox, with 28.9%. The continent with the strongest relative increase in market share is South America, where there is a 30% increase compared to last March. Numbers from the U.S. based company Net Applications Inc. last month showed a fall in Firefox’s share from 15.42% in April to 14.54%.

Sources

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

October 24, 2006

New version of Firefox browser released

New version of Firefox browser released – Wikinews, the free news source

New version of Firefox browser released

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
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Tuesday, October 24, 2006

Today, The Mozilla Corporation launches Firefox 2.0 Final, the Second-generation release of Firefox. Firefox 1.0 was originally released on November 9, 2004 , and currently Firefox has a usage share of about 12% [1].

New features in Firefox 2.0 include enhancements in security, tabbed browsing, performance, and extensions.

New features

Firefox 2.0 also has:

  • built-in spell checking
  • improved antiphishing feature
  • ability to restore a session if the session accidentally crashed
  • ability to reopen closed tabs

Search engines will also include their own suggestions.

Sources

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject:
Mozilla Firefox
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December 15, 2005

Mozilla, Internet Explorer adopt universal RSS symbol

Filed under: Archived,Internet,Microsoft,Mozilla,Science and technology — admin @ 5:00 am

Mozilla, Internet Explorer adopt universal RSS symbol

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
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Thursday, December 15, 2005

Feed icon used

Jane Kim, the program manager for RSS in Microsoft’s Internet Explorer 7, announced recently that her team had chosen a graphical representation of Web syndication feeds — one popularized by its competitor. Microsoft employees have been posting variations of conceptual designs since earlier this year, but have now announced that they chose an icon used by the rival browser, Mozilla Firefox. The Microsoft team collaborated with Mozilla staff during the selection process.

“I’m excited to announce that we’re adopting the icon used in Firefox,” wrote Kim. “We’ll be using the icon in the IE7 command bar whenever a page has a feed associated with it, and we’ll also use it in other places in the browser whenever we need a visual to represent RSS and feeds.”

Microsoft is poised to release IE7 with many of the new features popularized in Firefox, such as browser tabs, feed support, full PNG and CSS support, and other improvements.

Sources

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 10, 2005

Mozilla to fix Firefox security hole in patch

Filed under: Archived,Internet,Mozilla,Science and technology — admin @ 5:00 am

Mozilla to fix Firefox security hole in patch

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
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Saturday, December 10, 2005

The Mozilla Foundation announced today a plan to patch vulnerability in Mozilla Firefox 1.5 in late January or early February 2006.

Mike Schroepfer, vice president of engineering of the Mozilla Foundation, states “it’s a low-severity issue, but we will address it anyway.”

Packetstorm Security posted that Firefox 1.5, released on November 30, has vulnerability in its history.dat file, such that Firefox becomes very slow after restarting from a visit to a website exploiting the vulnerability. A URL of a few million characters takes advantage of the vulnerability. History.dat stores the user’s recently visited sites. Initially Packetstorm posted that a tailored URL could crash Firefox. When attempting to recreate the problem, Mozilla engineers found that the browser works slowly and takes an extremely long time to load a website, but does not crash.

If one does encounter the problem after visiting an exploiting website, clearing out the history will fix it.

Sources

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

September 25, 2005

Google Toolbar for Firefox now out of beta

Filed under: Archived,Google,Internet,Mozilla,Science and technology — admin @ 5:00 am

Google Toolbar for Firefox now out of beta

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
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Sunday, September 25, 2005

Google logo png.png

After two months, Google Toolbar for Firefox, a downloadable extension for the popular Firefox web browser, has been released from beta testing.

In addition to providing a Google search field, it also includes spell checking, the ability to automatically fill in forms, translates English into other languages, and offers a new feature called Search Suggest, which recommends query text as the user types in search terms. Google Suggest is also available as a separate extension that works with the standard Firefox search box.

In response to user requests, Google has made it possible to rearrange all icons on the toolbar, including the search box. The Google Toolbar for Firefox is available in 17 languages and requires Firefox 1.0 or above with the Windows XP/2000 SP3+, Mac OS X 10.2+, or Red Hat Linux 8.0+ operating systems. Users have also reported success with other Linux distributions. Another version for the Internet Explorer web browser is also available.

More information

Sources

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
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