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June 24, 2016

Lotto Soudal Cyclist Andre Greipel Has Eyes Set On 2016 Tour De France Stage Win

Lotto Soudal cyclist Andre Greipel has eyes set on 2016 Tour De France stage win

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Friday, June 24, 2016

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Belgian professional cycling team Lotto–Soudal confirmed on Thursday that its veteran stage winning cyclist André Greipel will be representing the team in the 2016 Tour de France which starts early next month.

Greipel has won over 20 Grand Tour stages at the Tour De France, Vuelta a España and the Giro d’Italia is set to be a sprint favorite coming into this years edition of the French tour. After successfully winning four stages in last years Tour de France, team Lotto–Soudal believe that we can expect a stage win from Griepel.

With approximately eight flat stages that directly suit the German cyclist, audiences can expect to see the extent of Greipels form within the first week of the tour. The 33-year-old will be joined by eight teammates including Lars Bak,Thomas De Gendt,Jens Debusschere, Tony Gallopin, Adam Hansen, Greg Henderson, Jürgen Roelandts and Marcel Sieberg. According to Lotto–Soudal, these riders will prove to be vital in providing a ‘lead-out train’ to assist Griepel against notable sprint finishers including Mark Cavendish from team  Dimension Data and Marcel Kittel representing  Etixx-Quick Step.



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March 25, 2016

Australian Teams break the 24-Hour Opperman Record

Filed under: Australia,Cycling,Disputed,New South Wales,Oceania,Sports — admin @ 5:00 am

Australian Teams break the 24-Hour Opperman Record

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Friday, March 25, 2016

After almost 24 hours of cycling, the final checkpoint in Wagga Wagga, saw Team Brevet cross the finish line with 800km and a new Australian and World Audax Flèche Opperman 24-hour record.

With the Victorian-based team averaging around 35km/h for the whole 24 hours, team captain, Drew Ginn said he was extremely happy with the result.

“To cover 800km and still have 10min spare was really satisfying. Plenty of tough times out on the road and moments of questioning but to have the group pull through the toughest periods from midnight until the sun cam up near Wagga was extraordinary,” Ginn said in a statement on his personal blog.

This is the second time Team Brevet has attempted to break the record, their 2015 Oppy attempt finishing at 700km after a bad run with punctures, heat and a late headwind.

For their 2016 attempt, each member of Team Brevet clocked up more hours in the saddle in preparation for the 2016 attempt with all five riders averaging over 500km a week.

“We are better prepared … mentally and physically”, team member, Scott Thomas said prior to the attempt.

The team started the challenge in the southwest Victorian town of Warrnambool, heading northwest through Ararat and Kerang before shifting further east over the border at Barham to Deniliquin then turning southeast for the final 100km from Narrandera to Wagga Wagga in New South Wales.

“Conditions were pretty ideal with good tail wind for the first 10hrs and only as we turned east did we experience a slight cross and head breeze. [But] being ahead of schedule really does help as the night is so tough to hold speed… with fear of kangaroo’s and potholes on the road,” Ginn said.

The previous Australian record for an open road team time trail of this type was 770km, set in 1993 by The Endorphins; the world record of 778km was set by the US Metro Paris team a short time later in 1995.

The women’s record of 550km was also broken with Team Five Abreast, who achieved 617km and an average speed of 32km/h for the whole 24-hours.



Sources[]

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

September 5, 2015

Vallnord UCI MTB Trials World Campionships in La Massana, Andorra

Vallnord UCI MTB Trials World Campionships in La Massana, Andorra

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Saturday, September 5, 2015

La Massana (Andorra), The UCI MTB Mountain Bike Trials World Championship took place this week between September 2nd and 5th. The men started in two disciplines, 20″ (inch) and 26″ wheel bicycles, and the women in one Open besides juniors competitions.

On Friday Janine Jungfels (Australia) took the title on the women course with a result of 22 dabs. Tatiana Janickova (Slovakia, 32 dabs) and Nina Reichenbach (Germany, 33) reached two and three. Later the same day Abel Mustieles (Spain) won the men competition on 20″ bikes with 22 dabs ahead of Lucien Leiser (Switzerland, 34) and Benito Ros (Spain, 36).
On Saturday afternoon Vincent Hermance (France) got the title for men in two runs through five courses on the 26 inch bikes with 23 dabs. Second and third were Jack Carthy (Great Britain, 25 dabs) and Kenny Belaey (Belgium, 26).

In mountain bike trials sport the starters have 2 or 3 trials of 2 minutes each in 5 different courses. The courses are constructed on dry ground as well as through small water streams. They go and jump by bike on obstacles of wood, rocks or concrete usually between 1,50 meters and 2,50 meters high. The rules are roughly: Putting a foot or hand down is one “dab” (penalty), two feet at the same time or exceeding 2 minutes is five dabs. Winner is the one with fewest dabs. The main skills needed are handling the bike, jumping and balance.

Sister links[]

  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg 2015 UCI Mountain Bike & Trials World Championships
  • Wikipedia-logo-v2.svg Vallnord

Sources[]

External links[]

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June 12, 2013

Australian Paralympians cycling around Fiji for people with disabilities

Australian Paralympians cycling around Fiji for people with disabilities

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Wednesday, June 12, 2013

Leanne Del Toso
Image: Australian Paralympic Committee/Australian Sports Commission.

Shelley Chaplin
Image: Australian Paralympic Committee/Australian Sports Commission.

Two Australian Paralympic wheelchair basketball players, Shelley Chaplin and Leanne Del Toso, are cycling around Fiji to raise money for people in Fiji with disabilities. They hope to cover the route, which is roughly 500 kilometers (300 miles) long, in just ten days. They started on June 7, 2013 and plan to finish by June 16.

Along the way, they intend to do outreach, and mentor people with disabilities. They hope to raise A$13,000. So far, they have raised over A$12,400. They are using crowdfunding to finance their sporting event.

Del Toso suffered muscle deterioration in her legs and hands due to a degenerative neurological condition when she was 19, and rides her bike with the aid of orthotics. Chaplin was born a paraplegic, and is using a handcycle.

They won silver medals at the 2012 Summer Paralympics in London with the Australia women’s national wheelchair basketball team, commonly known as the Gliders.

Both also played for Victoria in Round One of the Australia Women’s Wheelchair Basketball League (WNWBL) competition last weekend. Victoria won all four of its games. They expect to be back in action again in Round Two in Perth on June 21–23.



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April 2, 2013

Cyclists Jason English and Liz Smith win 24 Solo in Australia

Cyclists Jason English and Liz Smith win 24 Solo in Australia

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Tuesday, April 2, 2013

24 Hour Solo at Stromlo. Eventual race winner Jason English.
Image: Hawkeye7.

24 Hour Solo at Stromlo. Solo riders.
Image: Hawkeye7.

24 Hour Solo at Stromlo. In mountain bike riding, three riders is practically a peloton.
Image: Hawkeye7.

24 Hour Solo at Stromlo. Support crews for the riders provide food, liquids and mechanical assistance to the riders.
Image: Hawkeye7.

Mount Stromlo, Canberra — This Easter weekend, elite mountain bike riders competed in the Australian 24-hour solo championships at Canberra’s Stromlo Forest Park. Jason English from Port MacQuarie rode 33 laps and won the men’s race. Liz Smith from Wollongong rode 25 laps and won the women’s race.

Races are won by riding the most laps. If two riders complete the same number of laps in 24-hours, the winner is the one who has ridden them in the shortest time.

Riders wear lights on their helmets and bicycles during night laps. Due to the time of year, there is roughly twelve hours of daylight and twelve hours of darkness each day.

The event is a curtain raiser for the WEMBO World Solo 24 hour Mountain Bike Championships, which will be held at Stromlo Forest Park on 12 and 13 October 2013. The race was for solo riders only.

Mont24 at Kowen. Riders go past on the first lap
Image: Hawkeye7.

Mont24 at Kowen. Riders with cramps receive a massage
Image: Hawkeye7.

Mont24 at Kowen. General announcements are made, including a review of the race rules
Image: Hawkeye7.

Mont24 at Kowen. A typical team tent layout
Image: Hawkeye7.

The weekend before, the teams of riders took to the track at the Mont 24 hour race at Canberra’s Kowen forest. With over 3,000 riders participating, it is now Australia’s largest cycling race.

The team version of the race was favoured by the weekend warriors, but also attracted more than a few elite athletes. Laps were ridden in relay fashion: each rider handed over the baton (which looked like a credit card) to another member of the team after riding one or more laps.

The track was in excellent condition, running through the trees. Without steep climbs or overly difficult technical sections, it permitted fast lap times.

No injuries were reported.



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

External links

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April 1, 2013

Two weekends of mountain bike racing in Canberra

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Monday, April 1, 2013

Mount Stromlo, Canberra —

24 Hour Solo at Stromlo. Eventual race winner Jason English.
Image: Hawkeye7.

24 Hour Solo at Stromlo. Solo riders.
Image: Hawkeye7.

24 Hour Solo at Stromlo. In mountain bike riding, three riders is practically a peloton.

Image: Hawkeye7.]]

24 Hour Solo at Stromlo. Support crews for the riders provide food, liquids and mechanical assistance to the riders.
Image: Hawkeye7.

This Easter weekend, elite mountain bike riders competed in the Australian 24-hour solo championships at Canberra’s Stromlo Forest Park.

The men’s race was won by Jason English from Port MacQuarie, who rode 33 laps. The women’s race was won by Liz Smith from Wollongong, who rode 25 laps.

Races are won by riding the most laps. If two riders complete the same number of laps in 24-hours, the winner is the one who has ridden them in the shortest time.

Riders wear lights on their helmets and bicycles during night laps. Due to the time of year, there is roughly 12 hours of daylight and twelve hours of darkness each day.

The event is a curtain raiser for the WEMBO World Solo 24 hour Mountain Bike Championships, which will be held at Stromlo Forest Park on 12 and 13 October 2013.


Mont24 at Kowen. Riders go past on the first lap
Image: Hawkeye7.

Mont24 at Kowen. Riders with cramps receive a massage
Image: Hawkeye7.

Mont24 at Kowen. General announcements are made, including a review of the race rules

Image: Hawkeye7.]]

Mont24 at Kowen. A typical team tent layout
Image: Hawkeye7.

The race was for solo riders only. The weekend before, the teams of riders took to the track at the Mont 24 hour race at Canberra’s Kowen forest. With over 3,000 riders participating, it is now Australia’s largest cycling race.

In the team version of the race, favoured by the weekend warriors, but which also attracts more than a few elite athletes, laps are ridden in relay fashion, with each rider handing over the baton (which looked like a credit card) to another member of the team after riding one or more laps.

The track was in excellent condition, running through the trees. Without steep climbs or overly difficult technical sections, it permitted fast lap times.

No injuries were reported.



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

March 17, 2013

Andy Blair wins Capital Punishment 2013 mountain bike race

Andy Blair wins Capital Punishment 2013 mountain bike race

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Sunday, March 17, 2013

Mount Stromlo, Canberra — Yesterday in Capital Punishment, the Canberra 50km and 100km mountain bike race, Andy Blair won in the 100km distance in 3:30:25 ahead of Dylan Cooper and Shaun Lewis, last year’s winner. In the women’s event, Jenny Fay won in a time of 4:01:53 ahead of Michelle Ainsworth.

Competitors start at Sparrow Hill east of Canberra, and ride through Canberra the Black Mountain Reserve and the National Arboretum, ending at Stromlo Forest Park.

Cyclists cross the road at an untimed section of the course
Image: Hawkeye7.

Finish line on the criterium at Stromlo Forest Park
Image: Hawkeye7.

There were a variety of cyclists of different skill levels including former Australian national team members, but casual cyclists were very much in evidence. Some 1,662 cyclists competed, of whom 1,389 finished.

Beer awaits at the finish line at Stromlo Forest Park
Image: Hawkeye7.

Finishing area at the Criterium at Stromlo Forest Park
Image: Hawkeye7.

An injured cyclist who went over the handle bars
Image: Hawkeye7.



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Capital Punishment 2013 mountain bike race won by Andy Blair

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Sunday, March 17, 2013

Mount Stromlo, Canberra — Yesterday in Capital Punishment, the Canberra 50km and 100km mountain bike race, Andy Blair won in the 100km distance in 3:30:25 ahead of Dylan Cooper and Shaun Lewis, last year’s winner. In the women’s event, Jenny Fay won in a time of 4:01:53 ahead of Christy Ainsworth.

Competitors start at Sparrow Hill east of Canberra, and ride through Canberra the Black Mountain Reserve and the National Arboretum, ending at Stromlo Forest Park.

Cyclists cross the road at an untimed section of the course
Image: Hawkeye7.

Finish line on the criterium at Stromlo Forest Park
Image: Hawkeye7.

There were a variety of cyclists of different skill levels including former Australian national team members, but casual cyclists were very much in evidence. Some 1,662 cyclists competed, of whom 1,389 finished.

Beer awaits at the finish line at Stromlo Forest Park
Image: Hawkeye7.

Finishing area at the Criterium at Stronlo Forest Park
Image: Hawkeye7.

An injured cyclist who went over the handle bars
Image: Hawkeye7.



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 4, 2012

Australian Paralympian Janet Shaw dies aged 46

Australian Paralympian Janet Shaw dies aged 46

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Tuesday, December 4, 2012

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Peter Marsh at a Wikipedia workshop in 2011
Image: Leighblackall.

Western Australian Paralympic bronze medalist Janet Shaw has died following a long battle with cancer. She was 46 years old.

A vision impaired cyclist, she and pilot Kelly McCombie earned a pair of bronze medals at the 2004 Summer Paralympics in the individual pursuit and road race/time trial events. She also won four medals at the 2002 IPC Cycling World Championships. Beyond cycling, Shaw worked as a motivational speaker and author, having written two memoirs, Beyond the Red Door and a follow up called Bit of a Super Hero: Choosing the Challenge – My Journey with Cancer.

Australian national team coach said of Shaw, “I was privileged to be a National Coach with the Australian Paralympic Team for Athens and have a role with Janet and Kelly leading into those Games. They dedicated themselves so solidly together, and came away medaling in two events…. Janet said losing her eyesight was the best thing that ever happened to her because it eventually led her to where she was standing, waiting to achieve glory in Athens. That quote has stayed with me ever since. She was an amazingly strong person who actually saw more than us.”

This is the second recent death of an Australian Paralympian. In late November, another Australian Paralympian, Peter Marsh of Queensland, died at the age of 64. He competed at the 1976 Summer Paralympics, 1980 Summer Paralympics and 1984 Summer Paralympics. Prior to his death, he was active in a project to document the history of the Paralympic movement in Australia on Wikipedia.


Sources

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Australian Paralympian Janet Shaw died

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Tuesday, December 4, 2012

Peter Marsh at an Wikipedia workshop earlier this year
Image: Leighblackall.

Earlier this week, Western Australian Paralympic bronze medalist Janet Shaw died following a long battle with cancer. She was 46 years old. A vision impaired cyclist, she and pilot Kelly McCombie earned a pair of bronze medals at the 2004 Summer Paralympics in the individual pursuit and road race/time trial events. She also won four medals at the 2002 IPC Cycling World Championships. Beyond cycling, Shaw worked as a motivational speaker and author, having written two memoirs, Beyond the Red Door, and a follow up called Bit of a Super Hero: Choosing the Challenge – My Journey with Cancer.

Australian national team coach said of Shaw, “I was privileged to be a National Coach with the Australian Paralympic Team for Athens and have a role with Janet and Kelly leading into those Games. They dedicated themselves so solidly together, and came away medaling in two events. … Janet said losing her eyesight was the best thing that ever happened to her because it eventually led her to where she was standing, waiting to achieve glory in Athens. That quote has stayed with me ever since. She was an amazingly strong person who actually saw more than us.”

This is the second recent death of an Australian Paralympian. In late November, another Australian Paralympian, Peter Marsh of Queensland, died at the age of 64. He competed at the 1976 Summer Paralympics, 1980 Summer Paralympics and 1984 Summer Paralympics. Prior to his death, he was active in a project to document the history of the Paralympic movement in Australia on Wikipedia.


Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
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