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July 10, 2005

Mixed reactions to G8 summit

Mixed reactions to G8 summit – Wikinews, the free news source

Mixed reactions to G8 summit

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Sunday, July 10, 2005

On Friday, the annual meeting of the leaders of the world’s eight most powerful countries, the Group of Eight (G8), ended ahead of schedule with few resolutions to the disappointment of many. The G8 meeting ended early Friday to accommodate Tony Blair, who requested to return to London in response to Thursday’s bombings in London. At the conclusion of the meeting, the leaders pledged to increase humanitarian aid to Africa by $50 billion, however $30 billion had already been pledged previously.

The group was unable to make significant progress regarding global warming, but made several key decisions relating to combating poverty in Africa. The eight leaders pledged to double the previously proposed aid of $25 billion to $50 billion a year by 2010. The group also confirmed an earlier announcement that they would cancel the debt of 18 countries, mostly in Africa, selected from among the 38 heavily indebted poor countries (HIPCs).

Additionally, $2 billion was earmarked for aid to the Palestine Nation. In addition to the increase in aid for Africa, the group announced universal access to AIDS treatment, committed to a peacekeeping force in Africa, and heard African leaders’ promises to move toward democracies that follow the rule of law.

Disappointment from anti-poverty activists

Adriano Campolina Soares, head of ActionAid’s Americas office, stated her disappointment with the resolutions. “The G8 have completely failed to deliver trade justice. President George W. Bush and the European Union have played a cynical game of bluff. The US has no intention of giving up or lowering the massive subsidies it gives its cotton farmers, that are forcing 10 million farmers in West Africa out of business. Poor countries should take this as a warning that they will have a hard fight in the upcoming trade talks at the World Trade Organization.”

Jennifer Morgan, climate-change director for the World Wildlife Fund expressed frustration with the United States’ effort. “There’s been no movement from the Bush administration, even the very noble efforts of Prime Minister Blair to get President Bush to change his position have failed.”

Armed Police keep a vigilant eye at the gates of the G8 summit in Gleneagles. Photo: Chris Young/Crown Copyright.

G8 Summit, July 2005′
G8 Glenealges logo.png
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Others happy with resolution

U2 singer Bono sees it in a different perspective. “It’s worth stopping for a second and looking back down the valley of where we’ve come from, we jumped up and down when Live 8 raised $200 million, and now, to stop for a second, we are talking about $25 billion in new money.”

Live 8 organizer Bob Geldof described the summit as a “qualified triumph.”

Gordon Brown, British Chancellor of the Exchequer: “It makes you angry because there’s nothing in science or technology or medicine that should prevent us from tackling poverty. It’s a lack of political will and if Gleneagles is about anything it’s bringing together all the countries of the world – rich and poor – agreeing that we’ve got to take the action that’s necessary. That’s why I hope by the time Gleneagles is finished we can say that the timetable for action and poverty is one that will lead to great improvements by 2015.”

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July 6, 2005

Protestors detained after violence near G8 summit

Protestors detained after violence near G8 summit

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Wednesday, July 6, 2005

Protesters clash with police in Edinburgh

In Edinburgh, large police forces cordon off protests

Eight police officers have been injured and more than 32 people detained after protestors made an attempt to block the M9 road and railway lines.

The violence occurred when residents of a camp site near Stirling in central Scotland began a mass movement towards the Gleneagles summit. A branch of Burger King in the Springkerse area of Stirling was also vandalised.

World leaders from the United States, United Kingdom, Canada, Japan, Germany, France, Italy, and Russia are meeting in the 5 star Gleneagles hotel and golf course to discuss world issues. The presidents and prime ministers will debate, among other things, debt relief to Africa and climate change.

More than 100 activists dressed in black, many hiding their faces with clothing, “streamed” from the temporary campsite early Wednesday morning, where close to 5,000 protestors are said to be staying.

A camera man for the Associated Press Television said he saw a “group of around 100 smashing the windows of stationary cars and throwing stones at police.”

Bob Geldof, organiser of the Live 8 concerts and original Live Aid in 1985, has described the violent protestors as “idiots”. Many have criticised Geldof’s overexposure in the news, especially as apparent spokesman of the anti-G8 protests.

Previous summits

Previous G8 summits that resulted in violent protests were situated in Genoa, Italy in 2001, and Evian, France in 2003. Police responsible for Wednesday’s summit have taken no chances: roughly 10,000 police are on standby in Gleneagles, among watchtowers and surveillance cameras. A five-mile (8 kilometres) long fence of steel surrounds the hotel, complimented by no-fly zone above.

Earlier this week protesters clashed with riot police in Edinburgh, the capital. As many as 100 appeared in court on Tuesday, as a result of police officials’ promise of “zero tolerance”.

“Make no bones about it, if we encounter people who are prepared to use violence to achieve their aims … we will take robust action,” said Tayside Police Chief Constable John Vine in Auchterarder, the village closest to the Gleneagles hotel and country club.

Protestors and police officers numbering more than 20 were injured in over 6 hours of rioting in the Princes Street shopping area of Edinburgh, bringing the city centre to a standstill. Running clashes, baton charges, and mounted surges were some of the methods used by riot police at the scene.

Agenda

British Prime Minister Tony Blair will, as the host, set the agenda of this years’ summit. He is said to want “breakthroughs in global warming as well as Africa”.

Blair’s Commission for Africa has proposed to double aid to Africa by 2010, as well as a second US$25 billion increase in aid to Africa, and US$75 billion annual increase in worldwide aid.

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July 2, 2005

Live 8 concerts around the world to \”End Poverty Now\”

Live 8 concerts around the world to “End Poverty Now”

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Saturday, July 2, 2005

The Live 8 Concert in Rome, Italy

Massive music concerts took place around the planet under the Live 8 banner in an effort to put pressure on the leaders of the eight richest countries in the world to end global poverty.

All concerts were timed to take place between noon and 10pm local time, with over a million people expected to attend concerts in Britain, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the US, Canada, South Africa and Russia. The events were broadcast to a potential audience of five and a half billion people world-wide.

The largest concert was in the US in Philadelphia where, over the course of 7 hours, hundreds of thousands of people gathered to watch Stevie Wonder, Kanye West, Destiny’s Child, Dave Matthews Band, and Black Eyed Peas among others. Philadelphia native Will Smith both performed and was the opening presenter. Peak attendance, the maximum amount of people believed to be watching Live 8 on the Benjamin Franklin Parkway at a given time, is estimated to have been between 600,000 and 800,000.

In Hyde Park in London, 205,000 people watched acts including Elton John, Madonna, Coldplay, Robbie Williams and Pink Floyd. The concert was opened by Sir Paul McCartney and U2 playing Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band – the first time the song has ever been performed live by a Beatle. It ended at 11.58pm with all of the acts coming on stage to sing one last time.

Live8.jpg

Bill Gates – founder of Microsoft and the richest man in the world (owning $46.5 billion) – appeared on the London stage to discuss the challenges facing the world, before introducing Dido. Later, Kofi Annan, the Secretary-General of the UN addressed the audience, thanking them for their support.

However, the first concert to open – in Japan – only drew 10,000 spectators, disappointing many.

The concerts follow on 20 years after the Live Aid concert organised by Bob Geldof, which was created to raise money for famine victims in Ethopia.

By contrast, the aim of Live 8 – also organised by Geldof – is not fund-raising but instead to apply pressure to the leaders of the G8 to end world poverty, which claims the lives of 50,000 every day.

The Live 8 organisers are urging the G8 to:

  1. Double the aid sent to the world’s poorest countries,
  2. Fully cancel their debts,
  3. Change the trade laws so that they can build their own future.

The Finance Ministers of the G8 agreed a plan last month to cancel the debt of 18 of the poorest countries to the IMF, the World Bank and the African Development Fund, but are requiring other countries to end political and financial corruption before they become elegible for debt relief.

On Thursday the President of the United States, George W. Bush, announced that the US will double US aid to Africa by 2010 – increasing to $8.6 billion a year. Bob Geldof welcomed the news, saying “This is the first time we have heard this sort of language.

“This is very, very positive indeed.”

Line-up

London, United Kingdom

Crowd: 205,000

  • U2
  • Pink Floyd
  • Paul McCartney
  • Coldplay
  • Madonna
  • Sting
  • Robbie Williams
  • Dido
  • Elton John
  • Keane
  • Annie Lennox
  • Mariah Carey
  • Scissor Sisters
  • Joss Stone
  • Stereophonics
  • REM
  • Velvet Revolver
  • Bob Geldof
  • The Killers
  • The Cure
  • Snow Patrol


Berlin, Germany

Crowds at Tiergarten, Berlin

Crowd: 100,000

  • Crosby, Stills and Nash
  • Lauryn Hill
  • Brian Wilson
  • A-ha
  • Bap
  • Die Toten Hosen
  • Peter Maffay
  • Green Day


Philadelphia, United States

Crowd: 800,000 – 1,000,000

  • Will Smith (Host)
  • Bon Jovi
  • Dave Matthews Band
  • Stevie Wonder
  • P. Diddy
  • Maroon 5
  • Toby Keith
  • Jay-Z
  • Linkin Park
  • Sarah McLachlan
  • Rob Thomas
  • Keith Urban
  • 50 Cent
  • Kaiser Chiefs


Paris, France

Crowd: 200,000

  • Jamiroquai
  • Youssou N’Dour
  • Yannick Noah
  • Placebo
  • Craig David
  • Andrea Bocelli
  • Calogero
  • Kyo
  • Axelle Red
  • David Halliday
  • Manu Chao
  • Renaud


Rome, Italy

With temperatures in the 30s, fans went through a lot of water at the Live 8 concert in Rome

Crowd: 100,000

  • Duran Duran
  • Faith Hill
  • Tim McGraw
  • Irene Grandi
  • Jovanotti
  • Nek
  • Laura Pausini
  • Vasco Rossi
  • Zucchero


Several Italian bands really got the crowd going, but foreign bands such as Tim McGraw and Faith Hill were poorly received by the crowd.

Moscow, Russia

Crowd: 200,000

  • Pet Shop Boys
  • Spleen
  • Moral Code X

Barrie, Canada

Crowd: 35,000

  • Neil Young
  • Bryan Adams
  • Celine Dion
  • Motley Crue
  • Simple Plan

Johannesburg, South Africa

Crowd: 40,000

  • Oumou Sangare
  • Zola

Tokyo, Japan

Crowd: 10,000

  • Björk
  • Good Charlotte

In Cornwall

Crowd: 5,000

  • Daara J
  • Siyaya
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This was all Afrcan musicians plus Dido, guesting with Senegalese superstar Youssou N’Dour.

The Eden centre turned out to be an excellent site for TV or rather a web stream.

WOMAD was involved so there may be a record.

There was a weblink to South Africa and a live message from Nelson Mandela.

Archived video

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June 15, 2005

eBay UK bans sale of Live 8 tickets

eBay UK bans sale of Live 8 tickets – Wikinews, the free news source

eBay UK bans sale of Live 8 tickets

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Wednesday, June 15, 2005

Live8.jpg

The UK division of eBay announced yesterday that it was removing all listings for sale of tickets for Live 8 from its eBay.co.uk site. Whilst asserting that “resale of tickets is not illegal”, it stated that it was banning them in response to community pressure, and it was “absolutely the right thing to do”. No similar announcements were made for any other of eBay’s web sites, such as eBay.com, and no particular restrictions on the sales of event tickets with respect to Live 8 are included in eBay’s resale policy.

Bob Geldof had labelled the advertising for sale of the tickets “sick profiteering”. He described the community reaction as people realising that “the weakest people on our planet” were being exploited, and being “sickened by that”. In response to an earlier offer by eBay to hand over to the Live 8 charity its fees from the sales, Geldof had said “It is not acceptable that a giant electronic company that makes billions upon billions then morally says ‘we will just hand over our take to a charity’. It is filthy money made on the back of the poorest people on the planet. Stick it where it belongs.”


Related news

  • “Live 8 concert plans announced” — Wikinews, May 31, 2005
  • “Over 1.5m apply for British Live 8 tickets” — Wikinews, June 6, 2005

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June 12, 2005

Pink Floyd will reunite to play London\’s Live 8

Pink Floyd will reunite to play London’s Live 8

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Sunday, June 12, 2005

Pink Floyd's

Organizers of the upcoming London Live 8 concert have announced that legendary rock band Pink Floyd plans to perform on July 2. Guitarist David Gilmour, bassist Roger Waters, drummer Nick Mason, and keyboardist Richard Wright will play their first performance together since playing at Earls Court, London in 1981.

The band will come together, along with other musical acts such as Coldplay, Elton John, and Paul McCartney for this event. Live 8 is a series of free concerts at each of the G8 nations organized by Bob Geldof. These concerts, set on the 20th anniversary of Geldof’s Live Aid, have been planned to support the Make Poverty History campaign, which aims to reduce African poverty.

This lineup of Pink Floyd has not played together for 24 years due to a conflict between David Gilmour and Roger Waters over leadership and creative influence of the band. However, it seems that they are willing to put their differences behind to support Live 8; “Like most people I want to do everything I can to persuade the G8 leaders to make huge commitments to the relief of poverty and increased aid to the third world,” said David Gilmour and added, “Any squabbles Roger and the band have had in the past are so petty in this context, and if reforming for this concert will help focus attention then it’s got to be worthwhile.”

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June 6, 2005

Over 1.5m apply for British Live 8 tickets

Over 1.5m apply for British Live 8 tickets

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Monday, June 6, 2005

A poster for Live 8

The ‘text lottery’ for tickets to the London Live 8 concert began this morning. The concert, which is part of an international music bonanza taking place across North America and Europe, is planned to coincide with this summers G8 summit in Edinburgh.

Organised by Bob Geldof, the series of concerts are being held to raise awareness about Africa among young people. This is in contrast to the original Live Aid concerts which were more focused on raising money for Africa.

This evening a spokesperson for Live 8 revealed to the media that by 17:00UTC this afternoon, over 1.5m text entries had been received. Those hoping to win one of the coveted 150,000 tickets, are asked to text the answer to a simple question to 84599. The question is Which city is nearest to the G8 summit in July? A) Berlin, B) Moscow, C) Edinburgh. Texts cost £1.50 each and winners will be randomly selected on the 12th June by a computer. The first £1.6m of proceeds from the competition will be donated to the The Prince’s Trust.

The lineup for the London concert is as follows:

  • U2
  • The Rolling Stones
  • Paul McCartney
  • Coldplay
  • Madonna
  • Sting
  • Robbie Williams
  • Dido
  • Elton John
  • Keane
  • Annie Lennox
  • Mariah Carey
  • Muse
  • Scissor Sisters
  • Joss Stone
  • Stereophonics
  • REM
  • Velvet Revolver
  • Bob Geldof
  • The Killers
  • The Cure
  • Snow Patrol


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May 31, 2005

Live 8 concert plans announced

Live 8 concert plans announced – Wikinews, the free news source

Live 8 concert plans announced

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Tuesday, May 31, 2005

A poster for Live 8

In a press conference held at 13:00 UTC on Tuesday, Bob Geldof, Elton John, and Harvey Goldsmith announced Live 8, a set of simultaneous free concerts to be held in Philadelphia, London, Paris, Rome, and Berlin on July 2, 2005, to raise awareness of Make Poverty History, a campaign to get the richest nations to cancel debt and increase aid to developing countries. The concerts are scheduled to occur just before the G8 Summit in Gleneagles, Scotland, from July 6 to July 8.

“20 years ago, at the time of the original Live Aid concert, I was a self-obsessed drug addict.”, began Elton John. “I’ve grown up since”. He then described the aim of the concerts to raise awareness in the richest countries of the world of the plights of the poorest, and how his work on global AIDS awareness had impressed upon him the lack of awareness and ignorance that exists. “The Prime Minister of South Africa thinks that AIDS is something that is caused by poverty. I wish!”

Bob Geldof thanked the corporations who had already come forward to sponsor the event, including the BBC and AOL. In mentioning AOL he said that “20 years ago, almost nobody had a mobile ‘phone”, hinting at the possibility of AOL broadcasting the concerts to mobile telephones. Geldof also thanked The Prince’s Trust, which had already booked Hyde Park for July 2, for stepping aside in favour of Live 8.

Line-up

Although the line-up is not finalized, the presence of several artists was announced.

In London

  • PINK FLOYD
  • U2
  • The Rolling Stones
  • Paul McCartney
  • Coldplay
  • Madonna
  • Sting
  • Robbie Williams
  • Dido
  • Elton John
  • Keane
  • Annie Lennox
  • Mariah Carey
  • Muse
  • Scissor Sisters
  • Joss Stone
  • Stereophonics
  • REM
  • Velvet Revolver
  • Bob Geldof
  • The Killers
  • The Cure
  • Snow Patrol


In Berlin

  • Crosby, Stills and Nash
  • Lauryn Hill
  • Brian Wilson
  • A-ha
  • Bap
  • Die Toten Hosen
  • Peter Maffay


In Philadelphia

  • Will Smith (Host)
  • Bon Jovi
  • Dave Matthews Band
  • Stevie Wonder
  • P. Diddy
  • Maroon 5
  • Jay-Z
  • Sarah McLachlan
  • Rob Thomas
  • Keith Urban
  • 50 Cent
  • Kaiser Chiefs


In Paris

  • Jamiroquai
  • Youssou N’Dour
  • Yannick Noah
  • Placebo
  • Craig David
  • Andrea Bocelli
  • Calo Gero
  • Kyo
  • Axelle Red
  • Johnny Halliday
  • Manu Chao
  • Renaud


In Rome

  • Duran Duran
  • Faith Hill
  • Tim McGraw
  • Irene Grandi
  • Jovanotti
  • Nek
  • Laura Pausini
  • Vasco Rossi
  • Zucchero


Sources

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November 18, 2004

New Band Aid music video is launched

New Band Aid music video is launched – Wikinews, the free news source

New Band Aid music video is launched

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Thursday, November 18, 2004

In the United Kingdom, the music video for this Christmas’ remake of the charity single Do They Know It’s Christmas? was launched simultaneously today (Thursday) on several UK and Irish television channels including BBC One, BBC Two, RTE 1, ITV1, Channel 4, and Sky One. The debut was made at 17:55 GMT.

The song was originally recorded in 1984 by several of the biggest artists of the time including Bono, Bob Geldof, Paul McCartney and George Michael. This year, in celebration of 20 years since the first single, the song has been remade by over 50 of today’s best selling artists, including Coldplay frontman Chris Martin, Robbie Williams, Bono, Justin Hawkins of The Darkness and Dido.

The song, which is in aid of charity, is already tipped to be the Christmas No. 1 in the UK and Ireland. The song will also be launched as a charity mobile phone ringtone to raise funds for Sudan’s troubled Darfur region. Mycokemusic.com said it was going to put the track on its website from Thursday with all profits to be donated to charity. The single will be available to buy in shops from the 29 November.



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