Wiki Actu en

November 11, 2008

NASA calls end to Mars Phoenix mission

NASA calls end to Mars Phoenix mission – Wikinews, the free news source

NASA calls end to Mars Phoenix mission

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Tuesday, November 11, 2008

Related stories
  • NASA calls end to Mars Phoenix mission
  • NASA denies rumors of finding life on Mars
  • NASA to extend the Phoenix probe mission by 5 weeks
  • NASA says Martian soil could sustain life
  • Phoenix lander confirms presence of water ice on Mars
  • NASA: White substance photographed by Phoenix lander on Mars ‘must have been ice’

Phoenix Lander
More information:
  • Phoenix on Wikipedia
  • Mars

NASA officials have decided to call an end to the Mars Phoenix Mission, after winter took hold of the red planet. NASA calls the mission a total success.

“Phoenix has given us some surprises, and I’m confident we will be pulling more gems from this trove of data for years to come,” said Phoenix Principal Investigator Peter Smith of the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona in a statement on NASA’s website.

Phoenix was launched on August 4, 2007.
Image: NASA.

The Phoenix lander last sent a signal to Earth on November 2. NASA says that colder temperatures, lack of sunlight and increased dust particles on the lander’s solar arrays has stopped its on board batteries from charging, causing the instruments to fail.

Despite the news, Phoenix had operated two months longer than scheduled. The lander had been operating for over five months.

Phoenix was responsible for several discoveries on Mars, including the confirmation of the presence of water-ice, which had previously only been detected from space.

“Phoenix provided an important step to spur the hope that we can show Mars was once habitable and possibly supported life. Phoenix was supported by orbiting NASA spacecraft providing communications relay while producing their own fascinating science. With the upcoming launch of the Mars Science Laboratory, the Mars Program never sleeps,” said Doug McCuistion, director of the Mars Exploration Program.

NASA officials will continue to listen for a signal from Phoenix, in hopes that it will phone home again in the near future.



Sources

Commons
Wikimedia Commons has more media related to:
NASA calls end to Mars Phoenix mission
Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

August 5, 2008

NASA denies rumors of finding life on Mars

Filed under: Mars,NASA,Phoenix Mission,Science and technology,Space — admin @ 5:00 am

NASA denies rumors of finding life on Mars

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
Related stories
  • NASA calls end to Mars Phoenix mission
  • NASA denies rumors of finding life on Mars
  • NASA to extend the Phoenix probe mission by 5 weeks
  • NASA says Martian soil could sustain life
  • Phoenix lander confirms presence of water ice on Mars
  • NASA: White substance photographed by Phoenix lander on Mars ‘must have been ice’

Phoenix Lander
More information:
  • Phoenix on Wikipedia
  • Mars

Tuesday, August 5, 2008

NASA has denied media and internet speculation that the Phoenix Lander has found life on the ‘Red Planet’, Mars and has also denied that the White House in the United States has been briefed on such matters that would lead up to an announcement by NASA later this week. This comes just after NASA stated on July 31, that Phoenix confirmed the presence of water-ice on Mars.

Rumors began to spread on the internet Saturday after an unnamed scientist working on the Phoenix Mission stated to Aviation Week & Space Technology, the White House had been briefed on “provocative and complex” information that NASA has yet to disclose to the public regarding the “potential for life on Mars.” The scientist said that the announcement will be regarding the habitability of Mars rather than finding actual life. The scientist also said that the information had been excluded from the July 31 press conference.

NASA immediately denied those claims sending out a message on Twitter, a social networking and micro-blogging website which is used by NASA to communicate to the public in a style pretending that the Lander itself is talking to its readers, stating, “Heard about the recent news reports implying I may have found Martian life. Those reports are incorrect. Reports claiming there was a White House briefing are also untrue and incorrect.” The Phoenix Lander, according to NASA, does not have the ability to detect life, past or present, but the Lander’s MECA microscopy station could potentially ‘see’ bacteria in the soil, which NASA states have not been discovered.

“[The report of a White House briefing is] not true [and is] bogus”. MECA results have not been discussed at the White House. There is no one who knows either on the [Phoenix] project in Tucson or at [NASA] HQ who knows where this information came from,” said Peter Smith, the top investigator for the Phoenix Mission. Smith also added that MECA has “nothing new to report.”

The MECA or Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer, is designed to analyze soil samples as small as 16 μm to determine the chemical composition of the sample. While the lander were unable to image any bacteria, Phoenix’s MECA did detect potassium, magnesium and chloride, minerals that are necessary to create or sustain life. MECA also determined that the soil was acidic, which means it could support the growing of some plants from Earth like asparagus.

“We are attempting to assess the chemicals and minerals that make up the soil composition. We are now about half way through the process and there are several conflicting points of view. This is not a good time to go public with half the story,” added Smith who also stated that “we are committed to following a rigorous scientific process. While we have not completed our process on these soil samples, we have very interesting intermediate results. Initial MECA analyses suggested Earth-like soil. Further analysis has revealed un-Earthlike aspects of the soil chemistry.”

Despite the denials by NASA, some Internet observers maintain that NASA is still preparing for a major announcement.

“The reason that all this seems so hush-hush is due to a future paper and press release that appears likely to pop out of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and its Science magazine. Whatever the poop is from the scoop that’s been studied by Phoenix, that information is purportedly going through peer-review”, said David Leonard for LifeScience.com.

NASA will hold a media teleconference today August 5, at 2:00 p.m. EDT, to discuss these recent science activities.



Related news

  • “NASA to extend the Phoenix probe mission by 5 weeks” — Wikinews, July 31, 2008

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

August 4, 2008

NASA denies alleged announcement regarding the potential for life on Mars

Filed under: Mars,NASA,Phoenix Mission,Review,Science and technology,Space — admin @ 5:00 am
Related stories

Phoenix Lander
More information:

Monday, August 4, 2008

NASA has denied media and internet speculation that the Phoenix Lander has found life on the ‘Red Planet’, Mars and has also denied that the White House in the United States has been briefed on such matters that would lead up to an announcement by NASA later this week. This comes just after NASA stated on July 31, that Phoenix confirmed the presence if water-ice on Mars.

Rumors began to spread on the internet Saturday after an unnamed scientist working on the Phoenix Mission stated to AviationWeek.com the White House had briefed on “provocative and complex” information that NASA has yet to disclose to the public regarding the “potential for life on Mars.” The scientist said that the announcement will be regarding the habitability of Mars rather than finding actual life. The scientist also said that the information had been excluded from the July 31 press conference.

NASA immediately denied those claims sending out a message on ‘Twitter’, a social networking website which is used by NASA to communicate to the public in a style that makes users feel like the Lander itself is talking to them stating, “Heard about the recent news reports implying I may have found Martian life. Those reports are incorrect. Reports claiming there was a White House briefing are also untrue and incorrect.” Phoenix, according to NASA, does not have the ability to detect life, past or present, but the Lander’s microscopes can ‘see’ bacteria, which NASA states has not been discovered.

“[The White House briefing is] not true. MECA results have not been discussed at the White House. There is no one who knows either on the [Phoenix] project in Tucson or at [NASA] HQ who knows where this information came from,” said Peter Smith, the top investigator for the Phoenix Mission. Smith also added that MECA has “nothing new to report.” The MECA or Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer, is designed to analyze soil samples as small as 16 μm to determine the chemical composition of the sample. It is said that MECA is able to detect bacteria in the soil, but NASA states no such discovery has been made.

“We are attempting to assess the chemicals and minerals that make up the soil composition. We are now about half way through the process and there are several conflicting points of view. This is not a good time to go public with half the story,” added Smith.

Despite the denial by NASA, the journal Science through its website states that NASA is still preparing for a major announcement.

“The reason that all this seems so hush-hush is due to a future paper and press release that appears likely to pop out of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and its Science magazine. Whatever the poop is from the scoop that’s been studied by Phoenix, that information is purportedly going through peer-review”, said David Leonard for Science.

Sources

  • Andrea Thompson “NASA Scientist: Reports of Mars Life Finding Are ‘Bogus'”. Space.com, August 4, 2008
  • Rich Bowden “NASA prepares for possible announcement on potential for life on Mars”. thetechherald.com, August 3, 2008
  • Craig Covault “White House Briefed On Potential For Mars Life”. AviationWeek, August 1, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

August 1, 2008

NASA to extend the Phoenix probe mission by 5 weeks

NASA to extend the Phoenix probe mission by 5 weeks

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, August 1, 2008

Related stories

Phoenix Lander
More information:
  • Phoenix on Wikipedia
  • Mars

The Phoenix probe that was sent to Mars has had its mission extended. Part of Phoenix’s mission was to chemically analyze soil samples, and to confirm the presence of water ice. The ice was confirmed by the use of an instrument that can identify vapours; a small sample of ice within Martian soil was heated until it melted at 0°C (32°F), the melting point for water.

An artist’s rendition of the Phoenix Mars probe during landing.
Image: Corby Waste (JPL/NASA).

The original mission was planned to be funded for a 3 months, with the cutoff in late August. However, as a result of the probe’s good condition, NASA has stated that its mission will be extended by 5 weeks, till September 30.

“Phoenix is healthy and the projections for solar power look good, so we want to take full advantage of having this resource in one of the most interesting locations on Mars,” said the Head of NASA’s Mars Exploration Program, Michael Meyers. An additional expense of US$2 million will be incurred because of the extension, on top of the US$420 million that has already been spent. This will allow for two more trenches to be dug, which will be dubbed as “Cupboard” and “Neverland”.

The Phoenix probe landed on Mars on May 25 of this year near the north pole of Mars, where the ice was discovered. The ice was found in a trench approximately 5cm deep referred to as “Snow White”. “It’s been very successful and Mars had proven itself to be very interesting, mechanically the spacecraft is operating great, and there’s plenty of power margin to carry us beyond the waning summer,” said Meyers.

The original goal of the mission was to determine if the red planet was capable of supporting life. Phoenix is in the process of performing experiments to determine if ice ever melted in Mars’ history. In addition it is searching for the organic-based compounds that are necessary for life forms to exist.

Phoenix’s principal investigator Peter Smith told the press conference that “we hope to be able to answer the question of whether this was a habitable zone on Mars. It will be for future missions to find if anyone is home on this environment.”

Unlike the twin Mars Exploration Rovers which has now been operating on Mars for several years, the Phoenix Lander itself is expected to cease operations entirely by the exit of 2008 when the harsh Martian polar winter takes over and the low temperatures most likely will leave the Lander’s instruments irreparably damaged.



Related news

  • “Phoenix lander confirms presence of water ice on Mars” — Wikinews, June 23, 2008
  • “NASA: White substance photographed by Phoenix lander on Mars ‘must have been ice'” — Wikinews, June 20, 2008

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

June 26, 2008

NASA says Martian soil could sustain life

NASA says Martian soil could sustain life

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, June 26, 2008

Related stories

Phoenix Lander
More information:
  • Phoenix on Wikipedia
  • Mars

The scientists behind the Mars Phoenix Lander project announced that the soil on Mars was more alkaline than expected and could sustain life.

Scientists at NASA or the National Aeronautics and Space Administration claimed that they were “flabbergasted” by their discovery on the possibility that life could grow on Martian soil.

Thermal and evolved gas analyzer, used to determine alkaline content on Martian soil.
Image: NASA.

“It is the type of soil you would probably have in your back yard, you know, alkaline. You might be able to grow asparagus in it really well. … It is very exciting for us,” said Sam Kounaves, the lead wet chemist at NASA.

The project did not elaborate any further if there was indeed life on Mars, down to the microbe level and instead stated that their discovery was only preliminary and more analysis will be needed.

There was still no evidence in the soil that “would preclude life,” and instead of an assumption of a toxic environment, Martian soil is actually, “very friendly.”

The discovery was made after the Mars Phoenix Lander scooped up Martian soil for analysis. The lander touched down on Mars on May 25, 2008 and has been conducting several survey projects.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

June 23, 2008

Phoenix lander confirms presence of water ice on Mars

Phoenix lander confirms presence of water ice on Mars

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, June 23, 2008

Related stories

Phoenix Lander
More information:
  • Phoenix on Wikipedia
  • Mars

For the first time ever, NASA has confirmed the presence of water ice on Mars. The Phoenix lander, which landed on Mars on May 25, has confirmed to NASA scientists that the white substance it found while digging a trench on June 15 is water ice.

In the lower left corner of the left image, a group of lumps is visible. In the right image, the lumps have disappeared, similar to the process of evaporation.
Image: NASA/JPL.

“It is with great pride and a lot of joy that I announce today that we have found proof that this hard bright material is really water ice and not some other substance,” said Peter Smith, the primary investigator for Phoenix, at the University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona.

The chunks were left at the bottom of a trench informally called “Dodo-Goldilocks” when Phoenix’s Robotic Arm enlarged that trench on June 15, during the 20th Martian day, or sol, since landing. Several were gone when Phoenix looked at the trench days later. The chunks were visible on June 16, but when Phoenix looked at the trench again on June 19, some of the material had disappeared, implying that it may have evaporated or melted.

“This tells us we’ve got water ice within reach of the arm, which means we can continue this investigation with the tools we brought with us,” said primary investigator for Phoenix’s stereo imager, Mark Lemmon.

Scientists are planning to examine the substance and the soil surrounding it more closely. They plan to test it for signs of organic material and minerals, and hope to find out if the ice was ever a liquid which could have supported microbial life.

In December of 2006, scientists announced that the Mars Global Surveyor captured images of deposits in gullies on the surface of the planet Mars which have been created since the areas were photographed nine years ago. These deposits were believed to be the residue of liquid water breaking out of cliffs and crater walls, carrying sediment downhill through the gullies, and later evaporating. The gullies are located inside the Terra Sirenum crater and the Centauri Montes regions.

In June 2007 the ESA’s Mars Express spacecraft discovered ice deposits in the South Pole of Mars that are larger than the state of Texas. Scientists say that there is enough water in the deposits to cover the entire planet with up to 36 feet of water if the ice was to melt.



Related news

Sources



Bookmark-new.svg

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

June 20, 2008

NASA: White substance photographed by Phoenix lander on Mars \’must have been ice\’

NASA: White substance photographed by Phoenix lander on Mars ‘must have been ice’

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, June 20, 2008

White ‘chunks’ that were photographed by the Phoenix lander on Mars on June 15 after digging a trench, have disappeared, leading scientists to believe they most certainly found ice on the Red Planet.

“It must be ice. These little clumps completely disappearing over the course of a few days, that is perfect evidence that it’s ice. There had been some question whether the bright material was salt. Salt can’t do that,” said Phoenix Principal Investigator Peter Smith of the University of Arizona located in Tucson, Arizona.

The chunks were left at the bottom of a trench informally called “Dodo-Goldilocks” when Phoenix’s Robotic Arm enlarged that trench on June 15, during the 20th Martian day, or sol, since landing. Several were gone when Phoenix looked at the trench early today, on Sol 24.

Digging in a different trench Phoenix’s robotic Arm connected with a hard surface that has scientists excited about the prospect of next uncovering an icy layer.

“We have dug a trench and uncovered a hard layer at the same depth as the ice layer in our other trench,” said Washington University robotic arm investigator for Phoenix, Ray Arvidson. The arm tried at least three times to penetrate the layer, but was unsuccessful. As a result the arm went into a holding pattern, awaiting its next commands.



Sources



Bookmark-new.svg

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

June 11, 2008

NASA\’s Phoenix Lander has an oven full of Martian soil

NASA’s Phoenix Lander has an oven full of Martian soil

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, June 11, 2008

Phoenix took this image on Sol 14 (June 8, 2008). It shows two trenches dug by Phoenix’s Robotic Arm. The left trench was the first test trench.
Image: NASA/JPL.

NASA’s Phoenix Lander has begun to cook a scoop full of Martian soil. For reasons unknown to scientists, and after several seemingly unsuccessful attempts to break up the soil, a large amount was discovered to have passed through a screen leading to an on board oven.

“We have an oven full. It took 10 seconds to fill the oven. The ground moved,” said Phoenix co-investigator Bill Boynton, a researcher at the University of Arizona located in Tucson, Arizona.

The lander’s Robotic Arm delivered a partial scoopful of clumpy soil from a trench informally called “Baby Bear” to the number 4 oven on its TEGA (Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer) last Friday, June 6. NASA observed the method and reported that no soil had passed through the screens over the TEGA. The screen is to prevent larger bits of soil from clogging the narrow port to each oven so that fine particles fill the oven cavity, which is no wider than a pencil lead. The oven’s goal is to vaporize any ice or water that may be present in the soil. Minerals may also burn off and scientists say that vapors from anything that evaporates or vaporizes will be tested and analyzed.

After some debate, NASA decided to ‘shake’ the soil in hopes that it would break up the larger particles. To much disappointment after six tries using this method, only a few particles got through the screen. Scientists then ordered one last shake of the soil “in the off chance we might get lucky,” stated Boynton.

After a few days of troubleshooting, NASA looked back at the soil and discovered that, for an unknown reason, a large amount of soil had fallen through the screen and was ready for inspection by the TEGA. Boynton states that it is possible that the oven might have filled because of the cumulative effects of all the shaking, or because of changes in the soil’s cohesiveness as it sat for days on the top of the screen.

“There’s something very unusual about this soil, from a place on Mars we’ve never been before. We’re interested in learning what sort of chemical and mineral activity has caused the particles to clump and stick together,” Boynton commented.

Phoenix was originally ordered to put off using its TEGA until scientists came up with a solution to the clodded soil. It had been rescheduled to take readings of the Martian climate such as temperature and wind speed, and also to analyze a soil sample using the optical microscope, or MECA (Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer) on June 12. Scientists say that those tasks are still scheduled to take place. Pictures and results from that sample are expected to arrive on Thursday June 12, while the oven samples will take a few days to analyze.

“The dirt finally did start to flow and we actually got a full oven, so that problem is now behind us. We’re hopeful that some time in the next few days we’ll close the oven and begin the analysis process,” added Boynton.



Sources



Bookmark-new.svg

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

June 8, 2008

NASA\’s Phoenix spacecraft having trouble analyzing soil samples

Filed under: Archived,Mars,NASA,Phoenix Mission,Science and technology,Space — admin @ 5:00 am

NASA’s Phoenix spacecraft having trouble analyzing soil samples

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, June 8, 2008

Soil covers the screens leading to Phoenix’s TEGA.
Image: NASA/JPL.

NASA has stated that the Mars Phoenix lander is having trouble analyzing soil samples that its robotic arm is collecting. According to NASA, the soil appears to be too clodded to pass through screens on the way to Phoenix’s Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA).

Images taken by the lander’s camera shows that the robotic arm has dumped a large portion of soil over the TEGA, but it failed to register any soil which might have passed through the screens leading into the analyzer. The screen is designed to let through particles up to one-millimeter (0.04 inch) across while keeping out larger particles, in order to prevent clogging a funnel pathway to a tiny oven inside. An infrared beam crossing the pathway checks whether particles are entering the instrument and breaking the beam. It is now believed that the particles are either too large to pass through the screen, or the soil is too clumpy.

“I think it’s the cloddiness of the soil and not having enough fine granular material. In the future, we may prepare the soil by pushing down on the surface with the arm before scooping up the material to break it up, then sprinkle a smaller amount over the door,” said Ray Arvidson of Washington University located in St. Louis, Missouri. Arvidson is the Phoenix team’s science lead researcher for Saturday and digging czar for Phoenix’s mission.

NASA also plans to use a shaker inside the TEGA to shake any material or samples longer than previously planned in an attempt to break up the larger particles and clumps. Phoenix already utilized this method on Friday June 6, shaking the soil for five minutes before dumping it onto the screen. NASA plans to tell Phoenix to shake the material a little longer in order for the soil to be tested.

While scientists ponder ways to fix the issue, TEGA will not be analyzing any samples. Instead Phoenix is expected to have completed tasks today such as horizontally extending a trench where the lander dug two practice scoops earlier this week, and taking additional images of a small pile of soil that was scooped up and dropped onto the surface during the second of those practice digs.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

June 2, 2008

Phoenix spacecraft makes first \’impression\’ on Mars

Phoenix spacecraft makes first ‘impression’ on Mars

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, June 2, 2008

This view from the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA’s Phoenix Mars Lander shows the first impression.
Image: NASA/JPL.

The robotic arm scoop on the Phoenix lander on Mars has made its first impression on the red planet, leaving behind a mark that resembles a human footprint. It began its first dig on Saturday, May 31, and the camera on board the arm caught an image.

“This first touch allows us to utilize the Robotic Arm accurately. We are in a good situation for the upcoming sample acquisition and transfer,” stated Phoenix’s surface mission manager from NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, David Spencer.

Scientists named the initial impression Yeti in an area they describe as ‘The King of Hearts’. NASA has decided to name the various tasks and operations performed by Phoenix after fairy tale and mythological characters.

On Friday May 30, 2008, the same camera captured images of what appears to be ice under the lander. Scientists, who named the exposed area Snow Queen, say that as Phoenix landed the exhaust from its thrusters cleared away a three- to four-inch layer of Martian soil which exposed a flat layer of a white substance that NASA says could be ice. The image shows the white layer which is shiny and smooth. Scientists expect to find more of the alleged ice when Phoenix begins its digging mission not far from the initial test dig.

A close-up of the “Snow Queen” feature under the lander.
Image: NASA/JPL.

“What we see in the images is in agreement with the notion that it may be ice, and we suspect we will see the same thing in the digging area,” stated Uwe Keller, Robotic Arm Camera lead scientist for Phoenix.

Phoenix is searching for evidence of water and microbial life on Mars. Its mission is to determine Mars’s ability or inability to host life and hold water. The Phoenix lander uses a robotic arm to dig through the protective top soil layer to the alleged water ice below and ultimately bring both soil and water ice to the lander platform for sophisticated scientific analysis.



Related news

Sources



Bookmark-new.svg

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
Older Posts »

Powered by WordPress