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June 23, 2012

One Australian male and female archer qualify for Olympics after Ogden event

One Australian male and female archer qualify for Olympics after Ogden event

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Saturday, June 23, 2012

Alice Ingley and Odette Snazelle at the Australian Championships earlier this year
Image: LauraHale.

Snazelle practicing at the Australian Championships earlier this year
Image: LauraHale.

Following the Olympic Team Qualifying Tournament in Ogden, Utah this week, Australia earned spots for only one male and female archer to represent the country at the 2012 Summer Olympics.

At the 2012 Oceania Championships, Australia qualified a male and female archer to represent Australia at the Olympics. The Ogden-based qualifying competition was an opportunity for Australia to qualify additional archers and both a men’s and a women’s team with three available spots for each.

On the men’s team side, with Taylor Worth, Sky Kim, and Ryan Tyack representing the country, Australia beat Turkey 214–204 in the 1/8th round, then beat Romania 216–203 to qualify for the semi-finals. Australia’s men lost to India 209–221 to go into the bronze medal match, where they lost to Chinese Taipei 214–216. With only the top three national teams qualifying, Australia did not qualify for the last available Olympic spot for the men’s team event.

On the women’s side, the Australian team of Elisa Barnard, Alice Ingley, and Deonne Bridger was eliminated early on and did not advance to the knockout round.

In the men’s individual elimination competition, Tyack beat Peart of Great Britain 6–4 and lost to Duenas of Canada 3–7. Worth beat Hristov of Bulgaria 6–0, fellow Australian Kim 6–2, and the United States’s Ellison 6–4 and Wukie 6–4, before losing to Luis of Mexico 3–7. Kim beat Gankin of Kazakhstan 6–4 before losing to his teammate Worth. Matthew Masonwells beat Curchod of Switzerland 6–2 before losing to Tilmaz of Turkey 3–7.

In the women’s individual elimination competition, Alice Ingley went out in the first round following a 2–6 loss to Lee of Canada. Deonne Bridger also went out in the first round following a loss to Oyunsuren of Mongolia. Elisa Barnard had more success, beating Gonzalez of Mexico 7–3 and Jager of Denmark 6–4 before being eliminated 4–6 in a match against Oliver of Great Britain.

Australia will likely be sending Western Australian Taylor Worth and New South Walesman Elisa Barnard to the Games, continuing a tradition of Australian archers competing at the Olympics since the sport was re-introduced to the programme in 1972.



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January 18, 2010

Mongolia establishes moratorium on executions

Mongolia establishes moratorium on executions

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Monday, January 18, 2010

Mongolia
Other stories from Mongolia
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Location of Mongolia

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To write, edit, start or view other articles on Mongolia, see the Mongolia Portal
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File photo of Tsakhiagiin Elbegdorj from May 2009.
Image: Majigsuren Nyamsaikhan.

Mongolian President Tsakhiagiin Elbegdorj has announced a moratorium on executions, and will begin to seek their abolition. On January 14, 2010, in a speech to parliament, Elbegdorj announced that he would pardon all persons sentenced to death, stating that most countries in the world had abolished the death penalty, and Mongolia should follow suit. He also suggested that the death penalty be replaced with a 30 year prison sentence.

The decision was controversial: when Elbegdorj finished his speech, representatives of the Mongolian People’s Revolutionary Party refused to join in the applause, which is customary after a presidential address to parliament.

Human rights groups welcomed the move, with Amnesty International expressing hope that Mongolia will vote in favour of an upcoming United Nations resolution calling for an end to Capital punishment. It also urged other nations in the region to abolish the death penalty.

Many members of Mongolia’s opposition-led parliament favour harsh punishments for criminals, and Elbegdorj must gain approval from parliament before the death penalty can be abolished. If Elbegdorj fails to be re-elected, the new president could end the moratorium, and executions could resume.

Sources

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July 3, 2008

Mongolia\’s ruling party wins elections as rioting subsides

Filed under: Archived,Asia,Elections,Mongolia,Politics and conflicts — admin @ 5:00 am

Mongolia’s ruling party wins elections as rioting subsides

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Thursday, July 3, 2008

Headquarters of the Mongolian People’s Revolutionary Party, which was burned in the riots.

Mongolia’s ruling People’s Revolutionary Party (MPRP) has been declared winners of the country’s legislative elections, two days after allegations of vote-rigging leveled against the ruling party sparked violent protests in the capital of Ulaanbaatar.

Preliminary results show the MPRP with 47 seats out of 76 in the State Great Khural, General Election Committee spokesman Nergui reported. The opposing Democratic Party won 26 seats, Nergui said, with the remaining seats divided between minor parties. The official results are expected to be revealed tomorrow. Nevertheless, the preliminary results indicate a decisive victory for the former communist party.

International observers say the vote was largely fair. There were some irregularities reported, but according to William Ifante, Mongolia director of The Asia Foundation, “they were in no way widespread” and the election “appeared to have been transparent and free throughout.”

Tsakhiagiyn Elbegdorj, leader of the Democratic Party, believes the election was “stolen”.
Image: Vincent H. Miller.

This did not stop Democratic Party supporters from taking to the streets on Tuesday in protest of alleged election fraud. Rioters clashed with police, setting fire to the MPRP headquarters and a cultural center. Five people were killed in the violence, over 300 were injured, and around 700 protesters were detained. President Nambaryn Enkhbayar declared a four-day state of emergency in the capital, which will stay in effect until Saturday.

Calm has since been restored in Ulaanbaatar, although a heavy police presence remains in the city. “Life is steadily coming back to normal. Military equipment has been moved from the city and traffic restrictions have been lifted,” said Justic Minister Monkh-Orgil. Protests have been banned during the state of emergency, but Democratic Party leader Tsakhiagiyn Elbegdorj does not expect a recurrence of the violence.

However, Elbegdorj still asserts that the elections were marred by fraud, and he is demanding a recount. “I am deeply saddened that this vote was stolen,” he said. “It was stolen and there needs to be a recount. The result is false.”



Related news

  • “Mongolia declares state of emergency after violent protests, five people killed” — Wikinews, July 2, 2008

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July 2, 2008

A state of emergency is declared in Mongolia after violent protests

Filed under: Asia,Mongolia,Politics and conflicts — admin @ 5:00 am

Wednesday, July 2, 2008 A four-day state of emergency has been declared in the capital of Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar after violent protests occurred after allegations of vote rigging and fraud in Sunday’s elections. Reports state that 5 people have been killed, and over 300 injured. The injured were police and protesters alike, suffering from smoke poisoning, rubber bullets, and stoning. Among the injured was a Japanese citizen, who was reportedly flown to Japan in the morning.

Peaceful protests began on Monday evening, however they were dispersed in the night. The protests of Tuesday began peacefully on Sukhbaatar Square, however as they moved toward the ruling party (The Mongolian People’s Revolutionary Party) headquarters, they were joined by many more people, who began attacking the building with stones, knocking out the windows. Riot police were deployed, and as the protests escalated with protesters setting the building on fire with alcoholic beverages and petrol, they reacted with tear gas and rubber bullets. As the Party Headquarters was almost completely set ablaze, the protesters began looting the vicinity, with reports of bank robberies. A wooden extension to the Art Gallery nearby also caught fire, with many priceless artifacts either looted or damaged by fire and water. As the police and army were deployed, about 700 protesters were detained.

In the aftermath, a four-day state of emergency was declared in Ulaanbaatar by the president, Nambaryn Enkhbayar. Measures include:

  • All protests or demonstrations are banned
  • The city center will be sealed off, with a curfew between 10pm and 8am
  • All TV channels and radios except the Mongolian National Broadcaster will be temporarily shut down.
  • No alcohol will be sold or consumed.
  • Use of weapons or any object capable of causing bodily harm will be banned.


Sources

  • “Mongolia calls state of emergency”. BBC News, July 1, 2008
  • “Five dead in Mongolia post-election violence”. Reuters, July 2, 2008
  • Songuuli.mn “Монгол Улсын Ерөнхийлөгч Н.Энхбаярын “Онц байдал тогтоох тухай” зарлигийн дэлгэрэнгүй (in Mongolian)”. Nambaryn Enkhbayar, July 2, 2008
  • Mongolian National Broadcaster Television
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

State of emergency declared in Mongolia after violent protests

Filed under: Asia,Mongolia,Politics and conflicts — admin @ 5:00 am

Wednesday, July 2, 2008

Other stories from Mongolia
…More articles here
Location of Mongolia

A map showing the location of Mongolia

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Mongolia, see the Mongolia Portal
Portal:Mongolia

A four-day state of emergency has been declared in the capital of Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar after violent protests occurred after allegations of vote rigging and fraud in Sunday’s elections. Reports state that 5 people have been killed, and over 300 injured. The injured were police and protesters alike, suffering from smoke poisoning, rubber bullets, and stoning. Among the injured was a Japanese citizen, who was reportedly flown to Japan in the morning.

Peaceful protests began on Monday evening, however they were dispersed in the night. The protests of Tuesday began peacefully on Sukhbaatar Square, however as they moved toward the ruling party (The Mongolian People’s Revolutionary Party) headquarters, they were joined by many more people, who began attacking the building with stones, knocking out the windows.

Riot police were deployed, and as the protests escalated with protesters setting the building on fire with alcoholic beverages and petrol, they reacted with tear gas and rubber bullets. As the Party Headquarters was almost completely set ablaze, the protesters began looting the vicinity, with reports of bank robberies. A wooden extension to the Art Gallery nearby also caught fire, with many priceless artifacts either looted or damaged by fire and water. As the police and army were deployed, about 700 protesters were detained.

In the aftermath, a four-day state of emergency was declared in Ulaanbaatar by the president, Nambaryn Enkhbayar. Measures include:

  • All protests or demonstrations are banned
  • The city center will be sealed off, with a curfew between 10pm and 8am
  • All TV channels and radios except the Mongolian National Broadcaster will be temporarily shut down.
  • No alcohol will be sold or consumed.
  • Use of weapons or any object capable of causing bodily harm will be banned.

Preliminary election results indicate the MPRP clear majority in parliament.

Police chief said on the state TV that the situation is now under control, but it should be necessary to leave armored vehicles and the troops on their current positions in the capital. Officials say there are injured and detained protesters.

The four days of emergency rule will be the first in the history of Mongolia.


Sources

  • “Mongolia calls state of emergency”. BBC News, July 1, 2008
  • “Five dead in Mongolia post-election violence”. Reuters, July 2, 2008
  • Songuuli.mn “Монгол Улсын Ерөнхийлөгч Н.Энхбаярын “Онц байдал тогтоох тухай” зарлигийн дэлгэрэнгүй (in Mongolian)”. Nambaryn Enkhbayar, July 2, 2008
  • Mongolian National Broadcaster Television
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

State of emergency declared in Mongolia after violent protests, five people killed

Filed under: Asia,Mongolia,Politics and conflicts — admin @ 5:00 am

Wednesday, July 2, 2008

Other stories from Mongolia
…More articles here
Location of Mongolia

A map showing the location of Mongolia

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Mongolia, see the Mongolia Portal
Portal:Mongolia

A four-day state of emergency has been declared in the capital of Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar after violent protests occurred after allegations of vote rigging and fraud in Sunday’s elections. Reports state that 5 people have been killed, and over 300 injured. The injured were police and protesters alike, suffering from smoke poisoning, rubber bullets, and stoning. Among the injured was a Japanese citizen, who was reportedly flown to Japan in the morning.

Peaceful protests began on Monday evening, however they were dispersed in the night. The protests of Tuesday began peacefully on Sukhbaatar Square, however as they moved toward the ruling party (The Mongolian People’s Revolutionary Party) headquarters, they were joined by many more people, who began attacking the building with stones, knocking out the windows.

Riot police were deployed, and as the protests escalated with protesters setting the building on fire with alcoholic beverages and petrol, they reacted with tear gas and rubber bullets. As the Party Headquarters was almost completely set ablaze, the protesters began looting the vicinity, with reports of bank robberies. A wooden extension to the Art Gallery nearby also caught fire, with many priceless artifacts either looted or damaged by fire and water. As the police and army were deployed, about 700 protesters were detained.

In the aftermath, a four-day state of emergency was declared in Ulaanbaatar by the president, Nambaryn Enkhbayar. Measures include:

  • All protests or demonstrations are banned
  • The city center will be sealed off, with a curfew between 10pm and 8am
  • All TV channels and radios except the Mongolian National Broadcaster will be temporarily shut down.
  • No alcohol will be sold or consumed.
  • Use of weapons or any object capable of causing bodily harm will be banned.

Preliminary election results indicated that the MPRP had a clear majority in parliament.

Police chief said on the state TV that the situation is now under control, but it should be necessary to leave armored vehicles and the troops on their current positions in the capital. An emergency session of parliament also began at around 18:00 Local Time, however the session was closed to the media by vote, with the basis of high levels of tension in the streets.

All TV channels have been cut off except for the National Broadcaster. However some, like Eagle TV, and other internet-based news sites have been reporting on the Internet. A video on their site[1] shows interviews with citizens claiming that their relatives have been detained while coming home from work, although having no part in the protests. The interviewees also allege that the investigators are brutally detaining them.

The four days of emergency rule will be the first in the history of Mongolia.


Sources

  • “Mongolia calls state of emergency”. BBC News, July 1, 2008
  • “Five dead in Mongolia post-election violence”. Reuters, July 2, 2008
  • Songuuli.mn “Монгол Улсын Ерөнхийлөгч Н.Энхбаярын “Онц байдал тогтоох тухай” зарлигийн дэлгэрэнгүй (in Mongolian)”. Nambaryn Enkhbayar, July 2, 2008
  • Mongolian National Broadcaster Television
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Mongolia declares state of emergency after violent protests, five people killed

Mongolia declares state of emergency after violent protests, five people killed

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, July 2, 2008

Mongolia
Other stories from Mongolia
  • 23 June 2012: One Australian male and female archer qualify for Olympics after Ogden event
  • 18 January 2010: Mongolia establishes moratorium on executions
  • 3 July 2008: Mongolia’s ruling party wins elections as rioting subsides
  • 2 July 2008: Mongolia declares state of emergency after violent protests, five people killed
  • 5 November 2007: Mongolian People’s Revolutionary Party chooses new leader
…More articles here
Location of Mongolia

A map showing the location of Mongolia

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Mongolia, see the Mongolia Portal
Flag of Mongolia.svg

A four-day state of emergency has been declared in the capital of Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar after violent protests occurred after allegations of vote rigging and fraud in Sunday’s elections. Reports state that 5 people have been killed, and over 300 injured. The injured were police and protesters alike, suffering from smoke poisoning, rubber bullets, and stoning. Among the injured was a Japanese citizen, who was reportedly flown to Japan in the morning.

President Nambaryn Enkhbayar declared a state of emergency.

Peaceful protests began on Monday evening, however, they were dispersed in the night. The protests on Tuesday began peacefully on Sukhbaatar Square, however as they moved toward the headquarters of ruling party Mongolian People’s Revolutionary Party, they were joined by many more people, who began attacking the building with stones, knocking out the windows.

Riot police were deployed, and as the protests escalated with protesters setting the building on fire with alcoholic beverages and petrol, they reacted with tear gas and rubber bullets. As the Party Headquarters was almost completely set ablaze, the protesters began looting the vicinity, with reports of bank robberies. A wooden extension to the nearby Culture Palace, also known as the Art Gallery, also caught fire, with many priceless artifacts either looted or damaged by fire and water. As the police and army were deployed, about 700 protesters were detained.

In the aftermath, a four-day state of emergency was declared in Ulaanbaatar by President Nambaryn Enkhbayar. Measures include:

  • All protests or demonstrations are banned
  • The city center will be sealed off, with a curfew between 10pm and 8am
  • All TV channels and radios except the Mongolian National Broadcaster will be temporarily shut down.
  • No alcohol will be sold or consumed.
  • Use of weapons or any object capable of causing bodily harm will be banned.

Preliminary election results indicated that the MPRP had a clear majority in parliament.

Police chief said on the state TV that the situation is now under control, but it should be necessary to leave armored vehicles and the troops on their current positions in the capital. An emergency session of parliament also began at around 18:00 Local Time (July 2), however the session was closed to the media by vote, with the basis of high levels of tension erupting in case of disagreements during the session.

All TV channels have been cut off except for the Mongolian National Broadcaster. However some, like Eagle TV, and other internet-based news sites have been reporting on the Internet. A video on their site shows interviews with citizens claiming that their relatives have been detained while coming home from work, although having no part in the protests. The interviewees also allege that the investigators are brutally detaining them. The Government has made no reports about this.

The four days of emergency rule will be the first in the history of Mongolia.



Sources

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October 28, 2007

Mongolian People\’s Revolutionary Party chooses new leader

Mongolian People’s Revolutionary Party chooses new leader

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Sunday, October 28, 2007

The Mongolian People’s Revolutionary Party has elected a new party leader during its 25th Congress over the weekend. Current leader, Prime Minister Miyeegombiin Enkhbold, was defeated by Sanj Bayar in a 377-289 vote. Bayar, the former secretary general of the MPRP, is expected to succeed Enkhbold as Prime Minister following a decision to unify the positions of the party chair and Prime Minister.

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June 18, 2007

Politically charged murder trial under way in Malaysia

Politically charged murder trial under way in Malaysia

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Monday, June 18, 2007

Malaysia
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A trial in the murder of Mongolian-born model and interpreter Altantuya Shaaribuu got under way today in Shah Alam, Malaysia, with a former adviser to Deputy Prime Minister Najib Tun Razak as one of the defendants.

The prosecutor said political consultant Abdul Razak Baginda, 47, plotted the October 19, 2006, murder with two police officers, Chief Inspector Azilah Hadri and Corporal Sirul Azhar Umar, who fatally shot Altantuya, and then blew her body up with C-4 in an attempt to get rid of the evidence.

The sequence of events would be pieced together by testimonies of witnesses who saw Altantuya taken from Abdul Razak’s house, closed-circuit television footage and telephone records, deputy public prosecutor Abdul Majid said in his opening remarks.

“Several items belonging to the deceased have also been seized by the police from Sirul Azhar. [We] will show that the items belonged to the deceased through identification by prosecution witnesses and DNA tests, prosecutors told the court,” he said.

“Besides that, a pair of bloodstained slippers had been found in Sirul Azhar’s car and analysis by the Chemistry Department had confirmed through DNA tests that the blood was Altantuya’s,” Abdul Majid said.

Abdul Razak has admitted he had an affair with the 28-year-old Altantuya, who was born in Mongolia, and schooled in Russia and France. She was a part-time model and also worked as an interpreter and translator, as she was fluent in Mongolian, Russian, French and English. Abdul Razak has said he met Altantuya in Hong Kong in 2004, and they had a short-lived extramarital affair. After he ended it, Altantuya went to Malaysia and threatened Abdul Razak with blackmail.

Malaysian Deputy Prime Minister Najib Tun Razak has denied any links to the murder case.

After that, prosecutors say, Abdul Razak contacted Azilah, who was head of Deputy Premier Najib’s security detail, and that Abdul Razak “abetted” the two policemen “by planning and giving instructions to get rid of her by killing her”.

Abdul Razak, Azilah and Sirul Azul were brought into court handcuffed and made to sit in a dock.

Before entering, the tearful Abdul Razak hugged his wife who was wearing a T-shirt that said “Mrs. Abdul Razak Baginda” on the front, with “And Proud of It” on the back.

The politically charged trial has been a sensation in the Malaysian media, and is one of the biggest political scandals since former deputy prime minister and opposition leader Anwar Ibrahim was jailed on charges of corruption and sodomy. Supporters of Anwar, who was released from prison in 2004, forced Najib to vehemently deny allegation that he was linked to the murder.

The trial has also been beset by delays.

Today, lawyer Karpal Singh, representing Altantuya’s family, asked that the judge and a defense lawyer be replaced because they distantly related by marriage. Judge Mohammad Zaki Mohammad Yasin denied the request, saying his third cousin is dead and he has “no personal interest whatsoever” in the case. Defense lawyer Hazman Ahmed’s late wife was the third cousin of the judge.

The trial had been scheduled to start on June 4, but was postponed after the attorney general abruptly replaced the prosecutor after he was seen playing badminton with the judge. The new prosecutor then needed more time to study the case.

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May 22, 2005

Mongolia\’s ex-communists ahead going into Sunday\’s election

Filed under: Archived,Asia,Mongolia,Politics and conflicts — admin @ 5:00 am

Mongolia’s ex-communists ahead going into Sunday’s election

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Sunday, May 22, 2005

Ulaan Baatar, Mongolia

“Communism was much better,” said Tsahiriin Daariimaa Saturday on the eve of Mongolia’s presidential elections. Polls predict that many Mongolians plan to vote for their former communist rulers — the Mongolian People’s Revolutionary Party (MPRP).

Under communism, “everyone worked for the collective farm,” Daariimaa said. None of her children has a steady job these days.

Myatav Choijav is a Mongolian who shares that view; “Now, some people are very rich and some are very poor. In the old times, the government took better care of us ordinary people,” Choijav said. “Now, the government is very far away from us, especially if you live in the countryside and take care of sheep. Everyone was equal under communist rule,” Choijav said.

Tseveenjav, a 70-year-old sheep herder, agrees: “I will support the MPRP. They always do the right thing.”

Tseveenjav wears the traditional Mongolian thick boots and hat while sitting upon his horse with a dead marmot hung from his saddle. Falcon and Tiger, his sheepdogs, help him keep watch over 500 sheep.

Sambuu Ganbaator, a member of the Democratic Party, has a different opinion from most of his neighbors.

“Too many people forget what the MPRP did to Mongolia,” he said. “They kept Mongolia under a brutal dictatorship. You weren’t allowed to speak your mind.” Now, he said, “you can say anything you want to say and do what you want to live a happy life.”

The MPRP’s candidate, Nambariin Enkbayar, leads the polls and the ex-communist party has said that it is now committed to democracy.



Background info

  • Politics of Mongolia
  • Economy of Mongolia

Sources

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