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October 14, 2008

Party leaders wind up the Canadian election in Vancouver

Day
Day 34 of the 2008 Canadian elections
Stories from the 2008 Canadian Federal Elections
  • 13 October 2008: CanadaVOTES: Libertarian John Kittridge in St. Paul’s
  • 13 October 2008: Canadian scientists protest Harper’s attacks on science
  • 10 October 2008: CanadaVOTES: NDP candidate Paul Arbour in Carleton—Mississippi Mills
  • 10 October 2008: CanadaVOTES: NDP candidate Jo-Anne Boulding in Parry Sound—Muskoka
  • 10 October 2008: CanadaVOTES: NDP candidate David Sparrow in Don Valley West
National Parties

Bloc Québécois
Conservative Party of Canda
Green Party of Canada
Liberal Party of Canada
New Democratic Party

Tuesday, October 14, 2008

Finishing off a long holiday weekend and the Federal elections campaign in Vancouver, party leaders Stéphane Dion and Stephen Harper both worked Richmond, B.C., the riding of incumbent Liberal MP Raymond Chan.

The sitting Prime Minister and the head of Her Majesty’s Loyal Opposition made the most the last day of campaigning with cross-country efforts in an election which is widely expected to have no substantial changes in the make up of Canada’s House of Commons. Keeping the NDP’s efforts focused in seat-rich Ontario—with 106 of 308 seats—Leader Jack Layton’s Thanksgiving campaigning ended in Oshawa stumping with candidate Mike Shields in a riding hit by manufacturing job losses. Greens leader Elizabeth May worked her own riding of Central Nova, Nova Scotia, working to unseat Conservative incumbent Peter MacKay, while Gilles Duceppe is capitalizing on the crumbling Tory campaigns in Quebec.

In a campaign season of just 36 days, the shortest period allowed by Canadian law and which has become the usual period in recent elections, the primary issues have changed, the polling positions have not. Calling the election prior to his own party’s law, Harper hoped to capitalize on the Liberal party’s relative weakness after their recent leadership campaigns. Dion, with his Green Shift platform, seemed poised to capture the strong environmental interest of the electorate.

The Green Party, too, with its environmental roots and the party shift of Blair Wilson, seemed ready to move onto the national stage, and fielded candidates in every riding except that of Dion in a public show of cooperation between the two leaders; the Liberals did not field a candidate in Central Nova. The NDP initially reserved its attacks for the opposition, but after rumblings from within the party that the leadership was aiming to be number two rather than to capture the House of Commons and lead meant Layton reorganized the campaign with renewed vigor.

The global economic unrest, turbulent before the campaign but increasingly intruding into Canada’s financial systems as the campaign progressed, ultimately upset the planned campaign tracks. The economy, deficit spending, and the independence of Canada’s financial plans from those of the USA became issues as forecasts of modest growth were revised to little or no growth and possibly recession.

The debates didn’t help Harper either, forced to fend off four against one. The Greens, however, picked up attention first with the ill-fated threats by Harper and Layton to boycott the debates if May was included, and second when she presented and defended their platform firmly. Duceppe, bringing Quebec’s issues to the forefront in his sallies, won points which in the following weeks appeared to sway voters who had begun to consider a Tory in earlier polling.

The Conservatives still appear to be in the leading position vís-a-vís polls, but their peak of 39% on Sept. 29, within striking range of a majority rule in the House of Commons, has fallen to 34%, according to an Ipsos Reid poll. Harper predicted a return to power as a minority rule on Monday. While journalists were quick to ask Layton about a possible coalition with the Liberal party, he refused to comment until after the election.

The previous Parliament just before being dissolved was divided with 127 of the 308 seats being held by Conservative, 95 seats were Liberal, 48 Bloc Quebecois, 30 held by the New Democrats, the Greens held one and Independents held three. Four seats were vacant.

The polls open in Newfoundland and Labrador at 7am EDT, and the last polls in BC and Yukon and the Northwest Territories will close at 10pm EDT. With more than 23 million registered voters the results are still expected within an hour after polls close.


Sources

  • Elizabeth May on Wikipedia.
  • Gilles Duceppe on Wikipedia.
  • Green Party of Canada on Wikipedia.
  • Elections in Canada on Wikipedia.
  • Tobi Cohen “Bloc likely to pick up slack left by slumping Tories”. Edmonton Sun, October 10, 2008
  • Norma Greenaway “Economy ignited mean-spirited campaign”. Windsor Star, October 13, 2008
  • Strange Bedfellows, [Joel Connelly] “Canada’s election ends in Vancouver”. Blog.SeattlePI.com, October 13, 2008
  • NDP Press Release “Oshawa wants a leader who stands up for working families”. NDP.ca, October 13, 2008
  • “Battleground Ridings”. Globe and Mail,
  • “Facts and figures in Canada’s federal election”. Associated Press, October 13, 2008
  • “Party leaders on final cross-country blitz”. CTV.ca, October 13, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

October 13, 2008

CanadaVOTES: Libertarian John Kittridge in St. Paul\’s

CanadaVOTES: Libertarian John Kittridge in St. Paul’s

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
CanadaVOTES
Interview series
2008 Canadian federal election

ALBERTA
Calgary Southwest: CHP
Edmonton—Leduc: NDP
Yellowhead: CHP

BRITISH COLUMBIA
Langley: CHP*
Vancouver Kingsway: NDP

MANITOBA
Brandon—Souris: CHP

NOVA SCOTIA
Dartmouth—Cole Harbour: CHP

ONTARIO
Cambridge: NDP
Carleton—Mississippi Mills: NDP
Don Valley West: NDP
Elgin—Middlesex—London: NDP
Haldimand—Norfolk: LIB, CHP
Hamilton Centre: NDP i
Hamilton East—Stoney Creek: NDP i
Lanark-Front.-Lennox & Addin.: LIB
Parry Sound—Muskoka: NDP
Perth—Wellington: LIB
Prince Edward—Hastings: NDP
Simcoe—Grey: NDP
Thornhill: LIB i
Toronto Centre: AAEV*
Toronto—Danforth: LIB, AAEV
York—Simcoe: CHP

QUEBEC
Louis-Hébert: CHP
Westmount—Ville-Marie: NDP

SASKATCHEWAN
Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar: Lbtn

* Asterisks designate riding incumbents or registered political party leaders.
The letter “i” after a party abbreviation signifies an incumbent MP response.

To write, edit, start or view other Canada articles, see the Canada Portal

Monday, October 13, 2008

In an attempt to speak with as many candidates as possible during the 2008 Canadian federal election, Wikinews has talked via email with John Kittredge. John is a candidate in Toronto, Ontario’s St. Paul riding, running under the Libertarian Party banner. Libertarians are a minor, registered political party; they are looking to earn their first ever seat in the House of Commons.

Incumbent Carolyn Bennett of the Liberals is running against Libertarian Kittridge, Conservative Heather Jewell, New Democrat Anita Agrawal, and Justin Erdman, a Green. Bennett was the Minister of Health under previous Prime Minister Paul Martin’s Liberal government. Since it was created in 1935, the riding has been batted about between the Liberals and the now defunct Progessive Conservative party.

Libertarian Party of Canada logo

The following is an interview with Mr. Kittridge, conducted via email. The interview has had very limited editing, to eliminate in-text mentions of website addresses, but is otherwise left exactly as sent to Wikinews.

Interview

Why are you running for political office, why at the federal level, why this party, and why in this riding?

The mono-focus of our Party at both the Federal and Provincial level is less—MUCH less—government. I have been a member of various provincial and federal Libertarian Parties for almost 40 years and am committed to the proposition that “less government is better government.” I have observed the steady degradation of the Canadian character, the increasing limitation of our independence and the erosion of our economy as a result of inexorable “nanny state” control over the years. I want positive change and a better future with more self-reliance, more opportunity and an option-filled environment for the residents of St Paul, for all Canadians and, as a consequence for myself, my family and especially for my two-year old grandson.
St. Paul’s because it is an intensely interesting collection of neighborhoods full of passionate people who care. I respect my constituents and feel every one of them deserves a much better framework in which to express and achieve their potential than the pap offered by the mainline parties to buy their votes. Unfortunately most of them feel that more government, more regulations, more tax spending, more direction and fewer options constitute the solution to any and all of their concerns.
Like other Libertarians, I run to broaden the awareness of the less government option and of its desirability and practicality – also to deepen the debate and stimulate the people I talk with to think about a new way of doing things.

Previous to this campaign, have you been politically involved? How will you apply your previous work/volunteer/life experience to serving your constituents?

I ran as a Libertarian in last fall’s Ontario Provincial election but had not been particularly active before that other than as a party member. My day job is management consulting. I work in Canada and internationally with large clients, both public and private, to improve their processes and performance. I bring this results-focused, real-world perspective to the less-government debate. In the unlikely event of election, I would bring it to Ottawa – much in need of a house-cleaning and a strong dose of efficiency and effectiveness.

As you campaign around your riding, it’s likely that some issues are mentioned more often by voters, than other issues. What would you say are the three hottest topics this election, in your riding? What would you and your party do to address these issues?

People in St Paul’s seem to be most concerned about the economy (and pensions), health care and the environment.
  1. The economy would benefit from lower taxes, less government spending and meddling. Entrepreneurship could flourish and the economy grow. The political decision-making process cannot effectively be used to manage an economy. Libertarians would cease the pandering for votes, stop all corporate welfare, allow researchers and new business creators to benefit from their achievements (eliminating capital gains and dividend taxation among other things), dramatically simplify regulations, eliminate the restrictions on foreign investment in Canada, eliminate marketing boards, cut the civil service bureaucracy, etc. etc., etc. Short term, the concentration would be waste, dysfunctional and inappropriate programme spending and efficiency (easy targets in this environment). Longer term a broader and deeper elimination of programmes and an opening up of the market place to more options, competitors and innovators.
  2. Health care, in particular will benefit from new options, competition and an arena for open innovation. There is no moral, ethical, economic or technical justification for continuing to criminalize the open provision of health care options. Too many of our vulnerable parents, children, spouses, friends and neighbours are at risk to ignore the quality of care any longer simply to ensure that all Canadians have access to the same (poor) execution.
  3. The environment is somewhat different.
Where pollution and other environmental degradation is at issue we consider the problem in two aspects: (i) government controlled environment (crown lands, waterways, underground mineral rights, airspace, 200-mile-limit ocean waters off our coastline, etc.) and (ii) private property.
With respect to (i) Canadians and all other statist countries suffer the typical (and inevitable) “tragedy of the commons.” (When everybody owns it nobody owns it and it is treated accordingly. If and when legislation is passed to control it, the regulations are politically designed, favour special interest groups for political gain and the associated shenanigans produce an even worse outcome than existed prior to action being taken.) Hence clear-cutting, hence goldmine tailings in beautiful rivers, hence irrigation scemes [sic] despoiling wetlands, etc., etc.!
Real owners care AND are interested in the long term to cover their children’s children or their corporation’s future growth and success! Libertarians would sell these assets and create an ownership environment that would foster environmentalism, conservation and rational exploitation and / or enjoyment of natural resources.
With respect to (ii) our laws are adequate (or should be and certainly can be made to be) to protect private property from polluters and despoilers, whether individuals or corporations. Unfortunately they currently are not adequate to protect us from our own government’s encroachment, its’ pandering of rent seekers, or its’ political decision making. Hence pig farms in your back yard, hence mineshafts sunk in your back forty, hence a high rise or monster home erected across the street, etc., etc.!
Proper government provides an even playing field, applies the same rules to all players and dispenses justice even-handedly, quickly and appropriately. Libertarians would ensure that the relevant laws are actually applied and, in those areas of the regulations where change is required to catch up to technology, to cover omissions or to revise poorly structured statutes we would have it done.
Specifically with respect to atmospheric warming and CO2, once the pertinent regulatory environment had been tightened as noted above we would encouage cases to be brought to court in order to resolve the claims made and the degree to which action is indicated. The current state of the debate has been singularly one-sided and lacking of the true spirit and freedom of scientific inquiry. It would help to clarify it before any government (Liberal, Conservative, NDP or Green) tears the heart out of the economy of the country by taking draconian steps that may not even address the root cause of their concerns.
The programme suggestions currently featured in other party platforms would do more harm than good. Taxes are distorting and disruptive. Cap and trade encourages abuse. Government programs of redistribution inevitably fall under the spell of political decision making and are generally abused, if not corrupted outright. Setting emission levels at something that equates to about 40+% lower than today’s is to irresponsibly and knowingly lie to Canadians. Car emissions levels must be driven by cost-benefit considerations and cannot be dictated in an environment of unceretainty [sic] without, once again, distorting outcomes.
We would do none of these things, even if the jury weren’t still out on fundamental issues such as the causes and direction of atmospheric warming, the role of human produced CO2 (the “inverse,” after all, of the breath of life, O2), the possibility and potential impact of human CO2 control and its real cost. Libertarians would limit their involvement, as noted above, to providing a framework within which the issue could be resolved and addressed rationally by all the stakeholders.
Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.

Are there any misconceptions about you, your leader, or your party and platform?

Most people know very little about the party, the leader, myself or our platform. But one common misconception is that we are “extreme right wing.” We are not! Libertarians want to eliminate most of government involvement in both our economic and personal lives, letting Canadians live as free individuals and free traders. No rightist would ever subscribe to our principles. (Our principles are readily available on our web site.)

There are more ways than ever to get your message out, from the traditional campaign fliers and lawn signs, to new media like websites, Facebook, and YouTube. The tried-and-true routes get the message out to the masses much easier, but digital alternatives are much more measurable in how many are seeing or interacting with your campaign. What seems to be the most effective, from your experience?

The digital alternatives are proving effective for us. We are a “low” (generally “no”) budget organization / campaign. The various web options are an economical and practical way to spread our message and we have had, for us, a good electronic response.



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Canadian scientists protest Harper\’s attacks on science

Canadian scientists protest Harper’s attacks on science

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, October 13, 2008

Flag of Canada.svg

Day
Day 34 of the 2008 Canadian elections
Stories from the 2008 Canadian Federal Elections
National Parties

Bloc Québécois
Conservative Party of Canda
Green Party of Canada
Liberal Party of Canada
New Democratic Party

Le chef du Bloc québécois, Gilles Duceppe. Credit: Claude Boucher
The leader of the Conservative Party of Canada, Stephen Harper. Credit: The Conservative Party of Canada
Promotional photo of Elizabeth May, leader of the Green Party of Canada. Credit: Grant Neufeld
Stephane Dion at a Liberal leadership convention rally for his supporters. Credit: ycanada_news
Jack Layton at Quebec party conference in 2006. Credit: Atrian

Citing actions taken by the Conservative government since winning a minority government in 2006, 85 scientists across Canada have signed an open letter to all national party leaders calling on them to state how they will ‘improve Canada’s track record’ regarding the objectivity of science. This is the second such initiative within the week, the letter on 7 October being signed by 120 scientists.

The scientists signing the latest letter represent hundreds of researchers such as Deans, Department Heads, Research Chairs, and research team leaders. They come from academic fields of Anthropology, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Biology, Community Health and Epidemiology, Criminology, Earth & Ocean Sciences, Educational Psychology, Environmental & Engineering Sciences, Land Resource Science, Medicine, Nursing, Philosophy, Physics, Psychiatry, Social Work, and Sociology.

Queen’s University climate researcher John Smol lamented the need for scientists to protest in a public forum. “I think scientists tend to be conservative when it comes to voicing their opinions. But as far as the environment is concerned, the problem is so bad and the consequences are so terrible if we do not act,” he told CBC News.

The Harper government was cited for actions across the academic spectrum, from nuclear safety to human health to climate science. A repeated charge is misreprestation and/or suppression of scientific finds, as well as acting to prevent the dissemination of research, to silence scientists.

Cquote1.svg While science is not the only factor to be considered in political decision-making, ignoring and subverting science and scientific processes is unacceptable. Cquote2.svg

—Canadian Scientists Against the Politicization of Science

Within the government’s own Environment Canada the Conservatives have been accused of muzzling the department, even interfering with the release of one researcher’s science fiction novel. The novel, entitled “Hotter than Hell“, deals with a not-too-distant future strongly affected by global warming. Then-Environmental Minister Rona Ambrose ordered the scientist not to attend talks to promote his novel where his job title was given.

“It’s absolutely Orwellian what’s going on here in science in Canada,” said environmental scientist Andrew Weaver in an interview with The Georgia Straight. Weaver, lead author on three Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports and the recently published “Keeping Our Cool: Canada in a Warming World“, was not surprised when references to the UN’s IPCC reports were removed from Canadian government websites. He wrote in his book about new rules the Harper government put in place, requiring journalist questions for Environment Canada scientists be submitted in writing, and responses must first be presented to media-relations staff for editing and approval.

Vancouver’s Safe Injections Site project, Insite, a program designed to provide intravenous drug users with a medically-supervised location, is an internationally recognized model of successful harm-reduction public health policy, supported by both provincial and municipal governments. The national police force, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, engaged in a campaign to undermine the project according to documents discovered in a Freedom of Information Act query, including financing politically-motivated research.

The conservative government has been antagonistic to the program since coming to power, and though losing its case at every level of courts has appealed the Supreme Court of British Columbia ruling which struck down portions of Canada’s drug laws as unconstitutional. The judge gave the government one year to pass replacement legislation which addresses the Charter Right of addicts to health care which may save their life.

Conservative Health Minister Tony Clement has questioned the ethics of physicians who support the harm-reduction model of Insite. “Is it ethical for health-care professionals to support the administration of drugs that are of unknown substance, or purity or potency — drugs that cannot otherwise be legally prescribed?” he said at the Canadian Medical Association’s annual meeting.

“The minister was off base in calling into question the ethics of physicians involved in harm reduction,” CMA president Brian Day responded. “It’s clear that this was being used as a political issue.” More than 80% of physicians support the harm-reduction model, he said.

HAVE YOUR SAY
Wikinews commentary.svg
Aren’t the Conservatives in the right to press their ideologies, since that’s what the voting public elected them to do?
Add or view comments


Sources

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject:
Canadian federal election, 2006
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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

October 12, 2008

Canadian scientists protest Harper attacks on science

Day
Day 34 of the 2008 Canadian elections
Stories from the 2008 Canadian Federal Elections
  • 10 October 2008: CanadaVOTES: NDP candidate Paul Arbour in Carleton—Mississippi Mills
  • 10 October 2008: CanadaVOTES: NDP candidate Jo-Anne Boulding in Parry Sound—Muskoka
  • 10 October 2008: CanadaVOTES: NDP candidate David Sparrow in Don Valley West
  • 10 October 2008: CanadaVOTES: NDP candidate Anne Lagacé Dowson in Westmount—Ville-Marie
  • 10 October 2008: CanadaVOTES: CHP candidate Larry R. Heather in Calgary Southwest
National Parties

Bloc Québécois
Conservative Party of Canda
Green Party of Canada
Liberal Party of Canada
New Democratic Party

Le chef du Bloc québécois, Gilles Duceppe. Credit: Claude Boucher
The leader of the Conservative Party of Canada, Stephen Harper. Credit: The Conservative Party of Canada
Promotional photo of Elizabeth May, leader of the Green Party of Canada. Credit: Grant Neufeld
Stephane Dion at a Liberal leadership convention rally for his supporters. Credit: ycanada_news
Jack Layton at Quebec party conference in 2006. Credit: Atrian

Sunday, October 12, 2008

Citing actions taken by the Conservative government since winning a minority government in 2006, 85 scientists across Canada have signed an open letter to all national party leaders calling on them to state how they will ‘improve Canada’s track record’ regarding the objectivity of science. This is the second such initiative within the week, the letter on 7 October being signed by 120 scientists.

The scientists signing the latest letter represent hundreds of a researchers as Deans, Department Heads, Research Chairs, and research team leaders. They come from academic fields of Anthropology, Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Biology, Community Health and Epidemiology, Criminology, Earth & Ocean Sciences, Educational Psychology, Environmental & Engineering Sciences, Land Resource Science, Medicine, Nursing, Philosophy, Physics, Psychiatry, Social Work, and Sociology.

Queens University climate researcher John Smol lamented the need for scientists to protest in a public forum. “I think scientists tend to be conservative when it comes to voicing their opinions. But as far as the environment is concerned, the problem is so bad and the consequences are so terrible if we do not act,” he told CBC News.

The Harper government was cited for actions across the academic spectrum, from nuclear safety to human health to climate science. A repeated charge is misreprestation and/or suppression of scientific finds, as well as acting to prevent the dissemination of research, to silence scientists.

Within the government’s own Environment Canada the Conservatives have been accused of muzzling the department, even interfering with the release of one researcher’s science fiction novel. The novel, entitled “Hotter than Hell“, deals with a not-too-distant future strongly affected by global warming. Then-Environmental Minister Rona Ambrose ordered the scientist not to attend talks to promote his novel where his job title was given.

“It’s absolutely Orwellian what’s going on here in science in Canada,” said environmental scientist Andrew Weaver in an interview with The Georgia Straight. Weaver, lead author on three intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reports and the recently published “Keeping Our Cool: Canada in a Warming World “, was not surprised when references to the UN’s IPCC reports were removed from canadian government websites. He wrote in his book about new rules the Harper government put in place, requiring journalist questions for Environment Canada scientists be submitted in writing, and responses must first be presented to media-relations staff for editing and approval.

Vancouver’s Safe Injections Site project, Insite, a program designed to provide intravenous drug users with a medically-supervised location, is an internationally recognized model of successful harm-reduction public health policy, supported by both provincial and municipal governments. The national police force, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, engaged in a campaign to undermine the project according to documents discovered in a Freedom of Information Act query, including financing politically-motivated research.

The conservative government has been antagonistic to the program since coming to power, and though losing its case at every level of courts has appealed the B.C. Supreme Court ruling which struck down portions of Canada’s drug laws as unconstitutional. The judge gave the government one year to pass replacement legislation which addresses the Charter Right of addicts to health care which may save their life.

Conservative Health Minister Tony Clement has questioned the ethics of physicians who support the harm-reduction model of Insite. “Is it ethical for health-care professionals to support the administration of drugs that are of unknown substance, or purity or potency — drugs that cannot otherwise be legally prescribed?” he said at the CMA’s annual meeting.

“The minister was off base in calling into question the ethics of physicians involved in harm reduction,” CMA president Brian Day responded. “It’s clear that this was being used as a political issue.” More than 80% of physicians support the harm-reduction model, he said.

HAVE YOUR SAY
Aren’t the Conservatives in the right to press their ideologies, since that’s what the voting public elected them to do?
Add comment


Sources

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject:
  • Gary Mason “Insite revelation proves RCMP needs watching”. Globe and Mail, 11 October 2008
  • Paul Jay “Canadian researchers call for end to ‘politicization’ of science”. CBC.ca, 9 October 2008
  • Charlie Smith “Climate scientist claims Stephen Harper’s government has muzzled experts”. Georgia Straight, 25 September 2008
  • “Clement questions MDs who favour safe injection sites”. CBC.ca, 18 August 2008
  • E . Wood , T . Kerr , M . Tyndall , J . Montaner “The Canadian government’s treatment of scientific process and evidence: Inside the evaluation of North America’s first supervised injecting facility (Abstract)”. International Journal of Drug Policy, June 2008
  • “Minister stops book talk by Environment Canada scientist”. CBC.ca, 13 April 2006
  • “Legal Status of Insite”. Insite,
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

October 10, 2008

CanadaVOTES: NDP candidate Jo-Anne Boulding in Parry Sound—Muskoka

CanadaVOTES: NDP candidate Jo-Anne Boulding in Parry Sound—Muskoka

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, October 10, 2008

CanadaVOTES
Interview series
2008 Canadian federal election

ALBERTA
Calgary Southwest: CHP
Edmonton—Leduc: NDP
Yellowhead: CHP

BRITISH COLUMBIA
Langley: CHP*
Vancouver Kingsway: NDP

MANITOBA
Brandon—Souris: CHP

NOVA SCOTIA
Dartmouth—Cole Harbour: CHP

ONTARIO
Cambridge: NDP
Carleton—Mississippi Mills: NDP
Don Valley West: NDP
Elgin—Middlesex—London: NDP
Haldimand—Norfolk: LIB, CHP
Hamilton Centre: NDP i
Hamilton East—Stoney Creek: NDP i
Lanark-Front.-Lennox & Addin.: LIB
Parry Sound—Muskoka: NDP
Perth—Wellington: LIB
Prince Edward—Hastings: NDP
Simcoe—Grey: NDP
Thornhill: LIB i
Toronto Centre: AAEV*
Toronto—Danforth: LIB, AAEV
York—Simcoe: CHP

QUEBEC
Louis-Hébert: CHP
Westmount—Ville-Marie: NDP

SASKATCHEWAN
Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar: Lbtn

* Asterisks designate riding incumbents or registered political party leaders.
The letter “i” after a party abbreviation signifies an incumbent MP response.

To write, edit, start or view other Canada articles, see the Canada Portal

In Wikinews’ attempt to speak with as many candidates as possible during the 2008 Canadian federal election, Wikinews has talked via email with Jo-Anne Boulding. Jo-Anne is a candidate in Ontario’s Parry Sound—Muskoka riding, running under the New Democratic Party (NDP) banner.

The riding’s Conservative incumbent is Tony Clement, Minister of Health and Minister for FedNor. Other candidates in the riding are Liberal Jamie McGarvey, Green Glen Hodgson, and independent David Rowland.

The following is an interview with Ms. Boulding, conducted via email, over a week ago.

She did not respond to two of the main questions: “Previous to this campaign, have you been politically involved? How will you apply your previous work/volunteer/life experience to serving your constituents?” and “What would you say are the three hottest topics this election, in your riding? What would you and your party do to address these issues?” Being unanswered, these questions were edited out of the interview, which otherwise is published as received.

Interview

Why are you running for political office, why at the federal level, why this party, and why in this riding?

I am not a new candidate, this is my third federal election and I have also run in an Ontario Provincial election. I have been an NDP my whole adult life and come from a family of CCFers and NDPers. I have lived in this riding for 17 years and am very concerned about the decisions being made by the federal government for the past number of years and wish to improve the lives of all Canadians – a prosperous Canada that leaves no one behind. The corporate interests have overwhelmed the government’s agenda and it is time that it is a more balanced view of Canada and the lives of Canadians—old and young, women and men.

Are there any misconceptions about you, your leader, or your party and platform?

Jack and the party have prepared the best platform of any party and our message is certainly reaching people.

There are more ways than ever to get your message out, from the traditional campaign fliers and lawn signs, to new media like websites, Facebook, and YouTube. The tried-and-true routes get the message out to the masses much easier, but digital alternatives are much more measurable in how many are seeing or interacting with your campaign. What seems to be the most effective, from your experience?

This is a very rural riding and while we certainly use e-mail and websites as supportive tools, mail, door to door, mainstreeting and phoning people are still necessary as many do not have internet (especially high speed), many areas don’t even have cell phone reception and we have a large low income population that is having trouble making ends meet let alone pay for internet connection. All of these concerns are factored into how we manage the campaign and how we get the word out. We have a very large riding and it is difficult to get to every community, though we make our best effort. Our communities also provide us with opportunities for the voters to hear what we have to say – there are 10 all candidate meetings scheduled to date.



Sources

Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.

External links

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

CanadaVOTES: CHP candidate Vicki Gunn in York—Simcoe

CanadaVOTES: CHP candidate Vicki Gunn in York—Simcoe

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, October 10, 2008

CanadaVOTES
Interview series
2008 Canadian federal election

ALBERTA
Calgary Southwest: CHP
Edmonton—Leduc: NDP
Yellowhead: CHP

BRITISH COLUMBIA
Langley: CHP*
Vancouver Kingsway: NDP

MANITOBA
Brandon—Souris: CHP

NOVA SCOTIA
Dartmouth—Cole Harbour: CHP

ONTARIO
Cambridge: NDP
Carleton—Mississippi Mills: NDP
Don Valley West: NDP
Elgin—Middlesex—London: NDP
Haldimand—Norfolk: LIB, CHP
Hamilton Centre: NDP i
Hamilton East—Stoney Creek: NDP i
Lanark-Front.-Lennox & Addin.: LIB
Parry Sound—Muskoka: NDP
Perth—Wellington: LIB
Prince Edward—Hastings: NDP
Simcoe—Grey: NDP
Thornhill: LIB i
Toronto Centre: AAEV*
Toronto—Danforth: LIB, AAEV
York—Simcoe: CHP

QUEBEC
Louis-Hébert: CHP
Westmount—Ville-Marie: NDP

SASKATCHEWAN
Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar: Lbtn

* Asterisks designate riding incumbents or registered political party leaders.
The letter “i” after a party abbreviation signifies an incumbent MP response.

To write, edit, start or view other Canada articles, see the Canada Portal

In an attempt to speak with as many candidates as possible during the 2008 Canadian federal election, Wikinews has talked via email with Vicki Gunn. Gunn is a candidate in Ontario’s York—Simcoe riding, running under the Christian Heritage Party of Canada (CHP) banner. The CHP is a minor, registered political party running a significant number of candidates across the country, looking to earn its first ever seat in the House of Commons.

The riding has existed from 1968 to 1979, from 1988 to 1997, and from 2004 to present. As of the next provincial election in Ontario, it will be recognised as a provincial electoral district as well. Over the years, the riding has been represented by the Liberal Party, Progressive Conservative Party, again by the Progressive Conservatives, again by the Liberals, and since its recreation, the seat has been held by the Conservative Party of Canada.

Peter Van Loan, the Conservative incumbent, is the Minister Responsible for Democratic Reform and Leader of the Government in the House of Commons. The other candidates in the riding, besides Van Loan and the CHP’s Gunn, are New Democrat Sylvia Gerl, Liberal Judith Moses, and the Green Party’s John Dewar.

The following is an interview with Gunn, conducted via email. The interview is published unedited, as sent to Wikinews.

Interview

Why are you running for political office, why at the federal level, why this party, and why in this riding?

I am serving for the 3rd time as candidate because I believe in principles which do not change. I believe in strong families and I believe is social order. When we as a country supported our families and enabled them to raise their children without fear of government interference then we had a strong social order. We had 4 levels of government, self government, family government, church (spiritual) government, and civil government) which created healthy, balanced social order. The government did not interfere in family and spiritual government unless there was good reason. Today we have government interference in our homes, in our places of worship, in our thoughts, how we express ourselves. This is a dangerous precedent! Government has been allowed to grow unfettered in this country for too long. The CHP genuinely believes in 4 levels of government… each operating within it’s sphere of authority. We believe in smaller government. We believe in healthy families. We believe in a future for this country free from the all pervasive power of the state!

Previous to this campaign, have you been politically involved? How will you apply your previous work/volunteer/life experience to serving your constituents?

I served as candidate in York Simcoe for the Christian Heritage Party in both 2004 & 2006.
My earlier experience was… I worked for 15 years with the Royal Bank of Canada ending my banking career as a Branch Administration Officer. This was great training in financial management, administration and supervision.
I have, together with my husband, built the small business which has supported our family for the past 20 years. I am very aware of the challenges which face small businesses. There are many small businesses in York Simcoe that would benefit from my experience and understanding of the challenges they face.
I volunteered for about 11 years with a local distress centre, life is very difficult for some of our constituents in York Simcoe. When people are in times of crisis it is important that programs are in place to help them to get to the highest quality of life they can achieve. I also served on the local executive and the national executive which was great use of my administrative skills.
I served as foster parent to young offenders for 7 years which gave me opportunity to work with many troubled youth. I am aware of the challenges young people face as they grow up and also the need for strong, intact families to support them through those volatile years.
I have been a member of Speak for Success York Simcoe Toastmasters since 2004. I have served as Secretary, Vice President Education and President, which has further developed both my communication and leadership abilities. I have served as District Secretary for District 61 and Secretary of Northern Lights Advanced Toastmaster Club. I am currently serving as Club Coach to Simcoe Shores Toastmasters in Keswick. I would use the experience garnered in all of these roles as Member of Parliament because the type of government I envision would be strong on leadership and accountability.

As you campaign around your riding, it’s likely that some issues are mentioned more often by voters, than other issues. What would you say are the three hottest topics this election, in your riding? What would you and your party do to address these issues?

  1. Constituents in York Simcoe spend a lot of time travelling to and from work. Gas prices are high and the other political parties offer no real solutions. We offer a “Fair Tax”. This would be a tax on everything except essentials. Gas prices would be lower because there would not be layer upon layer of hidden taxes. We would also eliminate the income tax because it penalises industrious people for working. If 1/3 of your paycheque, what you have earned by your own labour, goes to the government before you see it, that is theft. A consumer tax would be paid when you purchase items or services, which means you control how much tax you pay. It is a much simpler form of book keeping. Our present tax laws are understood by extremely few people.
  2. Important to constituents of York Simcoe is also a healthy environment. It IS possible to decrease pollution without government digging deeper into OUR pockets. The hype around global warming has cooled. People recognise that a healthy environment can be worked on by dealing with the controllable causes of pollution. We dump many toxic chemicals into our atmosphere not just the naturally occurring ones such as Carbon Dioxide and Water. We can and must start controlling these toxic chemicals. We must do the same for our lakes and environment. Reducing the pollution we can control is environmentally friendly. It may not be as glamourous as a global movement but it is much more effective.
  3. We see a continued deterioration of our infrastructure. There is no need for government to borrow money from the major banks, basically renting the money supply, to improve infrastructure. The government is entitled to create money. By putting this money is circulation for the purpose of improving our infrastructure and charging municipalities no interest, we are not piling further debt on the backs of our children and grandchildren. As the money is repaid it is withdrawn from circulation thus making it noninflationary. This was done after WW2, when the return of 2 million soldiers seeking employment threatened our economy. This launched the biggest building boom in Canadian history and Canada was left with healthy infrastructure.
Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.

Are there any misconceptions about you, your leader, or your party and platform?

We are often tarred as a one issue party. However, that is far from the truth. The Christian Heritage Party has a developed platform in many areas and seeks to provide new approaches to old problems. If you keep doing the same thing, you get the same results. It’s time to do something different. This time… vote CHP … Better Solutions begin at www.chp.ca

There are more ways than ever to get your message out, from the traditional campaign fliers and lawn signs, to new media like websites, Facebook, and YouTube. The tried-and-true routes get the message out to the masses much easier, but digital alternatives are much more measurable in how many are seeing or interacting with your campaign. What seems to be the most effective, from your experience?

The most effective way of getting the message out will always be people talking to people. We are social beings. Other methods are quite impersonal but talking to people gives a chance for a real exchange of ideas.



External links

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject:
York—Simcoe
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CanadaVOTES: CHP candidate Stefan Jetchick in Louis-Hébert

CanadaVOTES: CHP candidate Stefan Jetchick in Louis-Hébert

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, October 10, 2008

CanadaVOTES
Interview series
2008 Canadian federal election

ALBERTA
Calgary Southwest: CHP
Edmonton—Leduc: NDP
Yellowhead: CHP

BRITISH COLUMBIA
Langley: CHP*
Vancouver Kingsway: NDP

MANITOBA
Brandon—Souris: CHP

NOVA SCOTIA
Dartmouth—Cole Harbour: CHP

ONTARIO
Cambridge: NDP
Carleton—Mississippi Mills: NDP
Don Valley West: NDP
Elgin—Middlesex—London: NDP
Haldimand—Norfolk: LIB, CHP
Hamilton Centre: NDP i
Hamilton East—Stoney Creek: NDP i
Lanark-Front.-Lennox & Addin.: LIB
Parry Sound—Muskoka: NDP
Perth—Wellington: LIB
Prince Edward—Hastings: NDP
Simcoe—Grey: NDP
Thornhill: LIB i
Toronto Centre: AAEV*
Toronto—Danforth: LIB, AAEV
York—Simcoe: CHP

QUEBEC
Louis-Hébert: CHP
Westmount—Ville-Marie: NDP

SASKATCHEWAN
Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar: Lbtn

* Asterisks designate riding incumbents or registered political party leaders.
The letter “i” after a party abbreviation signifies an incumbent MP response.

To write, edit, start or view other Canada articles, see the Canada Portal

In an attempt to speak with as many candidates as possible during the 2008 Canadian federal election, Wikinews has talked via email with Stefan Jetchick, who is a candidate in Quebec’s Louis-Hébert riding, running under the Christian Heritage Party of Canada (CHP) banner. The CHP is a minor, registered political party running a significant number of candidates across the country, looking to earn its first ever seat in the House of Commons. Jetchick is their only candidate running in the province.

The Quebec riding of Louis-Hébert, in the Capitale-Nationale region, has existed in the House of Commons since 2004. It includes the west section of Quebec City, primarily Sainte-Foy—Sillery and Laurentien’s south end. The Conservative incumbent in the riding is Luc Harvey; also running are Pascal-Pierre Paillé (Bloc Québécois), Denis Blanchette (New Democratic Party), Jean Beaupré (Liberal Party of Canada), and Michelle Fontaine (Green Party of Canada).

The following is an interview with Mr. Jetchick, conducted via email. The interview is published unedited, as sent to Wikinews; this includes Mr. Jetchick’s separation of multipart questions into fragments, and his formatting relating to his applicable experience.

Interview

Why are you running for political office?

To try to educate voters about one of the most important problems in Canada as we speak. (Sorry, this is going to be a big long.)
A good political party must propose the best solutions to the worst problems. But, what is currently the worst problem in Canada?
To find out, we must think about the nature of all societies. What is one of the corner stones of a civilized society? Human rights! Think about it: What’s the use of having well-paved roads, without potholes, if the police can arrest you for no reason? What’s the use of eliminating waiting lines in hospital emergency wards, if your neighbors can kidnap your children and steal your car? What’s the use of eliminating greenhouse gases, if you have no rights?
Now, given human rights are fundamental, which is the most fundamental human right? The right to life, of course! What’s the use of having the right to three warm meals a day, if anybody can kill you anytime? What’s the use of having the right to a decent minimum wage, if you’re dead?
But currently in Canada, anybody can kill any pre-born child for any reason, from conception to childbirth. That is our worst problem: we live in a barbaric country where the right to life is violated.

Why at the federal level?

Ideally, I would run at both the Federal and Provincial levels.

Why this party?

See answer to “Why are you running for political office” here above, and add to that the CHP is the only pro-life party in Canada.

And why in this riding?

Lived here most of my life.

Previous to this campaign, have you been politically involved?

Very little. Ran for the same party, same riding, in 2006.

How will you apply your previous work/volunteer/life experience to serving your constituents?

Experience — Effect on my political career
————————————————
Canadian Armed Forces — Never back down when intimidated
C++ Programmer — Keep citizens informed with my squeeky-clean HTML
BA in Philosophy — Drill down into root cause of problems
Conference interpreter — Communicate well in English/French

As you campaign around your riding, it’s likely that some issues are mentioned more often by voters, than other issues. What would you say are the three hottest topics this election, in your riding? Actually, I prefer forechecking to backchecking, so I’m trying to control the agenda in my riding. Hence my Challenge issued to all candidates.

What would you and your party do to address these issues?

Protect innocent human lives from conception to natural death.
Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.

Are there any misconceptions about you, your leader, or your party and platform?

Are there any? A whole truckload! See FAQ for Louis-Hébert for a sampling of the most popular.

There are more ways than ever to get your message out, from the traditional campaign fliers and lawn signs, to new media like websites, Facebook, and YouTube. The tried-and-true routes get the message out to the masses much easier, but digital alternatives are much more measurable in how many are seeing or interacting with your campaign. What seems to be the most effective, from your experience?

To answer that question, I like the old joke about the business owner who said: “50% of my marketing budget is wasted. Problem is, I don’t know which 50%!”
Seriously, I don’t know. So far, I’m trying a combination of web site with many detailed explanations, short flyers handed out door-to-door, and welcoming Radio-Canada journalists when they ask for interviews (three in three weeks so far).



Sources

External links

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CanadaVOTES: NDP candidate David Sparrow in Don Valley West

CanadaVOTES: NDP candidate David Sparrow in Don Valley West

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, October 10, 2008

CanadaVOTES
Interview series
2008 Canadian federal election

ALBERTA
Calgary Southwest: CHP
Edmonton—Leduc: NDP
Yellowhead: CHP

BRITISH COLUMBIA
Langley: CHP*
Vancouver Kingsway: NDP

MANITOBA
Brandon—Souris: CHP

NOVA SCOTIA
Dartmouth—Cole Harbour: CHP

ONTARIO
Cambridge: NDP
Carleton—Mississippi Mills: NDP
Don Valley West: NDP
Elgin—Middlesex—London: NDP
Haldimand—Norfolk: LIB, CHP
Hamilton Centre: NDP i
Hamilton East—Stoney Creek: NDP i
Lanark-Front.-Lennox & Addin.: LIB
Parry Sound—Muskoka: NDP
Perth—Wellington: LIB
Prince Edward—Hastings: NDP
Simcoe—Grey: NDP
Thornhill: LIB i
Toronto Centre: AAEV*
Toronto—Danforth: LIB, AAEV
York—Simcoe: CHP

QUEBEC
Louis-Hébert: CHP
Westmount—Ville-Marie: NDP

SASKATCHEWAN
Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar: Lbtn

* Asterisks designate riding incumbents or registered political party leaders.
The letter “i” after a party abbreviation signifies an incumbent MP response.

To write, edit, start or view other Canada articles, see the Canada Portal

In an attempt to speak with as many candidates as possible during the 2008 Canadian federal election, Wikinews has talked via email with David Sparrow. Sparrow is a candidate in Ontario’s Don Valley West riding, running under the New Democratic Party (NDP) banner. The riding was set to vote in a by-election on September 22, 2008, following the resignation of John Godfrey, but Stephen Harper’s sudden election call nulled that effort.

Also running in the Toronto riding are Liberal Rob Oliphant, Conservative John Carmichael, Green Georgina Wilcock, and Communist Catherine Holliday.

The following is an interview with Sparrow, conducted via email. The interview is published unedited, as sent to Wikinews.

Interview

Why are you running for political office, why at the federal level, why this party, and why in this riding?

Canada is at risk of losing its identity, economy and place on the international stage. Through changes to foreign ownership rules, big corporate tax cuts, aggressive changes to foreign policy and diminishing Arts budgets, we are seeing an erosion of Canadian control of our broadcasters, our manufacturing sector, our environment and the level of respect we command on the world over. This is why I am running for the NDP in Don Valley West. We must fight for the Canada we deserve. We must demand that government put all of our residents first before big, foreign controlled business and speculator and shareholder profits. Families are suffering and facing uncertainty over real, daily kitchen table issues and we need a responsive government and vocal, fearless representatives to fight for the issues important to them.
I have lived in and around Don Valley West for 19 years. My family and I lived for three years in Flemingdon Park. My children attended Gateway Public School. We now live in Leaside and I feel that my experience in these diverse communities along with my work in both the public and private sectors as an ambulance attendant and as a self-employed actor, writer and film maker will allow me to identify with the many issues facing different areas within our riding.
Jack Layton and the NDP have practical solutions that will address the kitchen table issues facing the people of Don Valley West. I have always felt that only by addressing the needs of residents at the local daily level of their lives can you properly represent this great country we share. The NDP does that.

Previous to this campaign, have you been politically involved? How will you apply your previous work/volunteer/life experience to serving your constituents?

I am currently the Vice President of Member Services for ACTRA Toronto and a national councillor for ACTRA National. I have lobbied on behalf of all cultural workers in Ottawa and at the Ontario Legislature to improve the funding and support of our talented Canadian artists and thereby the projection of Canada’s voice to Canadians and the world. I will use this experience to continue our fight for Canada’s identity and the reflection of our more established and emerging cultures. And I will use my skills, developed over 18 years in this profession, to fight for the important local issues facing the people of Don Valley West at the national level.

As you campaign around your riding, it’s likely that some issues are mentioned more often by voters, than other issues. What would you say are the three hottest topics this election, in your riding? What would you and your party do to address these issues?

In Don Valley West, whether in a challenged area like Flemingdon Park or a more comfortable area like Lawrence Park, people are concerned about the same things. The economy (jobs), keeping a roof over their head and food on the table and the future. Certainly their perspectives are different. The Flemingdon resident wants a national housing strategy that will lower their rent or give them hope of home ownership. The senior in Lawrence Park wants to know that they won’t be forced to leave their home simply because their property tax is rising faster than their fixed income. Immigrants want to know they can have hope of professional certification so they can work in the field they’ve been trained in. The managers and creative workers in the north of the riding want to avoid having to re-invent themselves and seek new employment at age 40 or 50. People are happiest when they can have confidence in theirs and their family’s future. Canada has a proud legacy of addressing potential need. Through public healthcare, Canada Pension Plan, Employment Insurance, even social assistance we have created a society that supports its weakest members and offers hope to every resident. Jack Layton and the NDP have practical plans to address these issues and redistribute tax dollars away from subsidies to large foreign companies and the war in Afghanistan to the issues closest to the hearts of hard working families.
Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.

Are there any misconceptions about you, your leader, or your party and platform?

The biggest misconception surrounding the NDP is that we can’t afford to implement our policies. It couldn’t be further from the truth. Right now, the Harper government is spending billions of Canadian tax dollars in Alberta providing tax breaks and subsidies to profitable, multi-national corporations, oil companies, so they can scarify the earth increase Canada’s carbon footprint and pollute an entire province. They are also spending billions of tax dollars on a war in Afghanistan that can not be won and in which we are contributing to the death of civilians and supporting US incursions into Pakistan. This money along with the 54 billion dollar EI surplus that they wrote off when the Auditor General said they owed it back to the Canadian people, should be used to meet the social, economic and infrastructure needs of Canadians. The NDP and Jack Layton will redistribute the tax dollars of Canadians to the benefit of all citizens.

There are more ways than ever to get your message out, from the traditional campaign fliers and lawn signs, to new media like websites, Facebook, and YouTube. The tried-and-true routes get the message out to the masses much easier, but digital alternatives are much more measurable in how many are seeing or interacting with your campaign. What seems to be the most effective, from your experience?

We are happy to be using many technologies to get the word out about the NDP’s big push here in Don Valley West. We’re using mailings, You Tube, Facebook, voice mail broadcasts, and good old fashioned door knocking to reach out to the 150K. Face to face, whether individually or in a group is always the best way to deliver your message.



Sources

Wikipedia
Wikipedia has more about this subject:
Don Valley West
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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

CanadaVOTES: CHP candidate Larry R. Heather in Calgary Southwest

CanadaVOTES: CHP candidate Larry R. Heather in Calgary Southwest

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, October 10, 2008

CanadaVOTES
Interview series
2008 Canadian federal election

ALBERTA
Calgary Southwest: CHP
Edmonton—Leduc: NDP
Yellowhead: CHP

BRITISH COLUMBIA
Langley: CHP*
Vancouver Kingsway: NDP

MANITOBA
Brandon—Souris: CHP

NOVA SCOTIA
Dartmouth—Cole Harbour: CHP

ONTARIO
Cambridge: NDP
Carleton—Mississippi Mills: NDP
Don Valley West: NDP
Elgin—Middlesex—London: NDP
Haldimand—Norfolk: LIB, CHP
Hamilton Centre: NDP i
Hamilton East—Stoney Creek: NDP i
Lanark-Front.-Lennox & Addin.: LIB
Parry Sound—Muskoka: NDP
Perth—Wellington: LIB
Prince Edward—Hastings: NDP
Simcoe—Grey: NDP
Thornhill: LIB i
Toronto Centre: AAEV*
Toronto—Danforth: LIB, AAEV
York—Simcoe: CHP

QUEBEC
Louis-Hébert: CHP
Westmount—Ville-Marie: NDP

SASKATCHEWAN
Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar: Lbtn

* Asterisks designate riding incumbents or registered political party leaders.
The letter “i” after a party abbreviation signifies an incumbent MP response.

To write, edit, start or view other Canada articles, see the Canada Portal

In an attempt to speak with as many candidates as possible during the 2008 Canadian federal election, Wikinews has talked via email with Larry R. Heather. Heather is a candidate in Alberta’s Calgary Southwest riding, running under the Christian Heritage Party of Canada (CHP) banner. The CHP is a minor, registered political party running a significant number of candidates across the country, looking to earn its first ever seat in the House of Commons.

Best known as an anti-abortion activist, this shipper-receiver holds a Bachelor of Religious Education from Saskatchewan’s Briercrest College and Seminary, and a BA in religion from Calgary’s Rocky Mountain College. He hosts the Gospel Road program on AM1140 in High River, and is remembered by many for his ketchup-soaked run-in with abortion law activist Henry Morgentaler.

He has run in the federal election of 1984 (Calgary South, ind.), 1988 (Calgary Southwest, ind), 1993 (Calgary West, CHP), 1997 (Calgary Southwest, CHP), 2004 (Calgary Southwest, CHP), and 2006 (Calgary Southwest, CHP), provincial elections of 1986 (Calgary Glenmore, ind), 1989 (Calgary Elbow, ind), and 2004 (Calgary Glenmore, Alberta Social Credit), and for various public school board ridings in 1989 and 1992. He has run against some big names, including Ralph Klein (1989), Preston Manning (1997), and Stephen Harper (1993, 2004, 2006). His 2006 campaign featured controversial and graphic images, to illustrate his pro-life and anti-same sex marriage messages.

His major opponent in the riding is economist and lecturer Stephen Harper, a Conservative, who just so happens to be the current Prime Minister. Harper previously represented Calgary West. Other names on the ballot include Liberal Marlene Lamontagne, New Democrat Holly Heffernan, Libertarian Dennis Young, and Green Party candidate Kelly Christie. The riding is any part of Calgary that is west of the Canadian Pacific rail line, and south of the Glenway Trail.

The following is an interview with Heather, conducted via email. The interview has had very limited editing, to eliminate in-text mentions of website addresses, but is otherwise left exactly as sent to Wikinews.

Interview

Why are you running for political office, why at the federal level, why this party, and why in this riding?

I am running for the Christian Heritage Party for Calgary Southwest because it is the only Federal Party that is committed to the Supremacy of God’s ethical laws in the crafting of federal administration and legislation. To flavour the ballot with this option for the voters is an imperative for me personally. It is my highest act of citizenship to offer my constituents the option of returning to the founding principles of our nation’s Christian Heritage, the only way that Canada can continue to survive as the nations we have known in the past. Of course, these sort of decisions are primarily made at the federal level and that is where my focus is. The Calgary Southwest electoral district is critical to contrast our approach to that of the Conservative Party Prime Minister, Stephen Harper. This has been my home riding since 1963 and I, unlike the Prime Minister, actually make a residence in the riding.

Previous to this campaign, have you been politically involved? How will you apply your previous work/volunteer/life experience to serving your constituents?

This is my seventh federal campaign for member of Parliament, two as an independant [sic], and five as a Christian Heritage Party Candidate. Six of the runs were in Calgary Southwest, one in Calgary West. I have also run for public school board and MLA for the Alberta provincial elections in the past, both as an independant [sic] and for the Alberta Social Credit Party.
I have participated in a number of community and Christian ministry positions, both in leadership, and on the member volunteer level. I have a wide base of reading and research into various issues affecting the welfare of citizens. I am always looking towards learning new approaches and solutions that deal with reality and the world we truly must live in.

As you campaign around your riding, it’s likely that some issues are mentioned more often by voters, than other issues. What would you say are the three hottest topics this election, in your riding? What would you and your party do to address these issues?

I believe the management of the economy under ethical free enterprise is the primary concern of the voters in Calgary Southwest. Also troubling to many is the proper management of health care, and general respect for the value of innocent human life under the barrage of a compromised justice system. The disrepect shown to the pre-born and the traditional definition of marriage, has many wondering whether the decision makershave not abandoned all sense of moral rationality.
Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.

Are there any misconceptions about you, your leader, or your party and platform?

Any examination of the full policy of the Christian Heritage Party will show a complete response of policy to the major areas of federal responsibility. Because we talk about critical issues that no other party will mention, it is wrongly perceived that we are strumming a one string banjo. This is not true, and exactly the reason why our Party Leader, Ron Gray—should be included in the national leaders television debates – where the full range of issues will not be censored out. Check out our platform at chp.ca, or go to my campaign website for my applications to the specifics of issues in Calgary Southwest. or interact with me on my Calgary Southwest blog or my Facebook page.

There are more ways than ever to get your message out, from the traditional campaign fliers and lawn signs, to new media like websites, Facebook, and YouTube. The tried-and-true routes get the message out to the masses much easier, but digital alternatives are much more measurable in how many are seeing or interacting with your campaign. What seems to be the most effective, from your experience?

The blog and Facebook for me, are just in their beginnings, but I see from the start, the willingness of people to see their input put on public sites where their opinion and allegiances can be made known is evident. The door to door brochure is still the mainstay source for most, the doorknocking and personal face to face encounter the most effective as time allows. But electronic interaction is the way most active people will have a chance for direct interaction with the Candidate in this busy day and age.



Sources

Wikipedia Learn more about Larry R. Heather and Calgary Southwest on Wikipedia.
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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

CanadaVOTES: NDP candidate Paul Arbour in Carleton—Mississippi Mills

CanadaVOTES: NDP candidate Paul Arbour in Carleton—Mississippi Mills

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, October 10, 2008

CanadaVOTES
Interview series
2008 Canadian federal election

ALBERTA
Calgary Southwest: CHP
Edmonton—Leduc: NDP
Yellowhead: CHP

BRITISH COLUMBIA
Langley: CHP*
Vancouver Kingsway: NDP

MANITOBA
Brandon—Souris: CHP

NOVA SCOTIA
Dartmouth—Cole Harbour: CHP

ONTARIO
Cambridge: NDP
Carleton—Mississippi Mills: NDP
Don Valley West: NDP
Elgin—Middlesex—London: NDP
Haldimand—Norfolk: LIB, CHP
Hamilton Centre: NDP i
Hamilton East—Stoney Creek: NDP i
Lanark-Front.-Lennox & Addin.: LIB
Parry Sound—Muskoka: NDP
Perth—Wellington: LIB
Prince Edward—Hastings: NDP
Simcoe—Grey: NDP
Thornhill: LIB i
Toronto Centre: AAEV*
Toronto—Danforth: LIB, AAEV
York—Simcoe: CHP

QUEBEC
Louis-Hébert: CHP
Westmount—Ville-Marie: NDP

SASKATCHEWAN
Saskatoon—Rosetown—Biggar: Lbtn

* Asterisks designate riding incumbents or registered political party leaders.
The letter “i” after a party abbreviation signifies an incumbent MP response.

To write, edit, start or view other Canada articles, see the Canada Portal

In an attempt to speak with as many candidates as possible during the 2008 Canadian federal election, Wikinews has talked via email with Paul Arbour. Arbour is a candidate in Ontario’s Carleton—Mississippi Mills riding, running under the New Democratic Party (NDP) banner.

The riding is currently represented by Gordon O’Connor, a Conservative. The Minister of National Revenue, O’Connor is up against the NDP’s Arbour, Liberal Justin Mackinnon, and Green Jake Cole. Previous MPs in the riding were Progressive Conservative, Liberal, and Canadian Alliance members. A riding since 1988, Carleton—Mississippi Mills is in the Capital region.

The following is an interview with Arbour, conducted via email. The interview has had very limited editing, to eliminate in-text mentions of website addresses, but is otherwise left exactly as sent to Wikinews.

Interview

Why are you running for political office, why at the federal level, why this party, and why in this riding?

I am running for federal office because I feel that is where I have the most to offer, and where the issues that affect myself and my friends are the most significant. I have chosen to run for the NDP because not only is this a party of strong leadership, but also because I really believe in the messages of the party. I am running in this riding because it is where I live and play.

Previous to this campaign, have you been politically involved? How will you apply your previous work/volunteer/life experience to serving your constituents?

I have been politically active almost my entire life. As a student I was strongly involved in FESFO(The Francophone Students Federation), and when I moved to this area I became involved in the party as a member of the riding association executive.
I have been working through the ‘tech burst’ and know very well how it has affect the people of this riding and this country. I also have a great deal of experience driving for what is right. I have been referred to in my job as a ‘pitbull’ because I don’t give up on a problem or issue just because someone says that there is no easy solution. Usually the most difficult solutions are also the most effective.
As a member of Toastmasters I have learned an incredible amount about speaking, sharing information, working as part of a team, and providing strong leadership to my peers.
Through my work as a Stage Manager for musical theater I have learned to wear many hats at the same time, build teams, friendships, and strengthen groups to achieve very complex goals

As you campaign around your riding, it’s likely that some issues are mentioned more often by voters, than other issues. What would you say are the three hottest topics this election, in your riding? What would you and your party do to address these issues?

The biggest issue around this riding and across the country is the economy. We see the ‘economy’ as a blanket statement, but at the end of the day, for myself anyway, I see the ‘economy’ as being a question of whether or not I will have a job tomorrow.: For so many people, knowledge workers and others alike, knowing that one might be out of work tomorrow causes an incredible amount of stress on individuals and their families.
The NDP has a strong plan to address the loss of jobs in this country, and I personally have a plan to move our technology sector forward by working with industry leaders, and community members. Training and skills advancement is the only way that we as Canadians will be able to distinguish ourselves in the future knowledge economy.
Wikinews
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Are there any misconceptions about you, your leader, or your party and platform?

I don’t know about any misconceptions about myself, but many people believe that the NDP doesn’t have the drive or skill to run this country. That is absolutely false. We have the depth of experience and passion to move this country forward.

There are more ways than ever to get your message out, from the traditional campaign fliers and lawn signs, to new media like websites, Facebook, and YouTube. The tried-and-true routes get the message out to the masses much easier, but digital alternatives are much more measurable in how many are seeing or interacting with your campaign. What seems to be the most effective, from your experience?

So far I’ve been trying just about everything, it would seem that web pages are currently the way to go. I have received many comments, questions, and kudos by people because they have seen the web page and know where to find us.
I have received many complaints this election about the number of signs throughout the community and that brings me forward to question where exactly this will lead in the future I don’t know. Doing away with campaign signs sounds like a good idea to me since they seem to be so wasteful.
In this campaign we are experimenting with different marketing techniques that go along with ‘fliers’ but line up more toward a marketing campaign. Since we have the ability and technology do do small run, high quality documents from the home, why not put those to use, and tailor the message to the audience.



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