Wiki Actu en

August 21, 2007

Weakening Dean makes landfall on Mexican coast

Weakening Dean makes landfall on Mexican coast

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Tuesday, August 21, 2007

Hurricane Dean satellite image as of 19:15 UTC on August 21, 2007.

After gaining strength in the western Caribbean last night, Hurricane Dean made landfall as a Category 5 storm on Mexico’s Yucatán coast at about 4:30 a.m. this morning (EDT).

The storm struck just north of Chetumal, the capital of the Mexican state of Quintana Roo. However, hurricane-force winds were felt over 60 miles (~100 km) away from the center of the storm, and tropical storm conditions impacted areas 175 miles (280 km) away.

The Mexican government ordered the deployment of over 4,000 troops, and declared a state of emergency in the state of Campeche. Some areas braced for up to 20 inches (510 mm) of rain.

Dean made landfall as a category 5 storm, before being downgraded hours later to a category 3 storm. Later Tuesday afternoon, Dean was downgraded to a category 2 storm. Currently, the storm maintains category 1 status, with top sustained winds at 85 mph (137 km/h).

The hurricane moved towards modern oil installations of the Yucatan Peninsula, prompting evacuations of offshore oil rigs that produce most of Mexico’s oil and gas.

Forecasters warn the storm could pick up strength as it crosses the Bay of Campeche and turn into an even more destructive hurricane before making a second landfall on Wednesday.

A hurricane warning remains in effect along the Gulf Coast of Mexico from south of Progreso to Tampico.

Forecasters do not believe it presents a threat to the United States.

Dean is being blamed for 13 deaths already.

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

August 18, 2007

Hurricane Dean forecasted to become \”catastrophic\” Category 5 storm

Hurricane Dean forecasted to become “catastrophic” Category 5 storm

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Saturday, August 18, 2007

Hurricane Dean forecast update at 8 a.m. (EDT) update on August 18, 2007, courtesy of NOAA.

The National Hurricane Center in Miami is calling Hurricane Dean “extremely dangerous,” saying that the storm is gaining strength and will likely become a Category 5 storm. The storm’s winds are currently clocked at 150 mph, classifying it as a Category 4 hurricane. A Category 5 hurricane means the storm has winds of over 155 mph and has the potential to cause “catastrophic” damage.

Dean is currently moving through the eastern Caribbean, and is heading towards the Dominican Republic and Haiti. The storm is expected to hit Jamaica on Sunday, and then gain even more power as it strikes Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula on Monday.

Dean could hit the mainland of the United States on Wednesday. Therefore, officials in Texas and Louisiana are currently making major preparations.

Rick Perry, the Governor of Texas, said the hurricane is an “imminent threat,” saying the state is preparing for its arrival. Task forces have been put on alert, and supply trucks and other resources are in position.

Governor Kathleen Blanco of Louisiana declared a state of emergency yesterday so local governments can move forward with emergency plans if necessary. However, forecasters say there is little chance of Dean moving toward Louisiana. Instead, the storm is expected to threaten Mexico or Texas.

A hurricane watch has been issued for Haiti from the Haiti/Dominican Republic border to Port-au-Prince. Jamaica has opened all shelters and Cuba has declared a “state of alert” in preparation for the storm.

A tropical storm warning remains in effect for the U.S. and Spanish Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico.

At 5 a.m. EDT, the center of Hurricane Dean was about 240 miles south-southwest of San Juan, Puerto Rico, and 660 miles east-southeast of Kingston, Jamaica, and was moving west at 14 mph. However, the storm is expected to pick up speed today.

Hurricane Dean could force NASA to cut short Endeavour’s flight. Mission management team chairman Leroy Cain said, “We’d really like to protect an option to be able to end the mission on Tuesday.”

The Associated Press reports several deaths and significant damage on the islands of St. Lucia, Dominica and Martinique.

Related news

  • “Hurricane Dean now a Category 4 storm” — Wikinews, August 17, 2007

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg



This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

August 17, 2007

Hurricane Dean now a Category 4 storm

Hurricane Dean now a Category 4 storm – Wikinews, the free news source

Hurricane Dean now a Category 4 storm

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Friday, August 17, 2007

Hurricane Dean 2 a.m. (EDT) update on August 18, 2007 courtesy of NOAA.

The National Hurricane Center in Miami now says that the Atlantic’s first hurricane has reached Category 4 status, with winds up to 140 mph (225 km/h). Dean is now being called a “major hurricane.”

While the storm is currently moving west through the Carribean, additional strengthening is forecast within the next 24 hours.

A hurricane watch has now been issued for Haiti from the Haiti/Dominican Republic border to Port-au-Prince. The Dominican Republic government has changed the tropical storm watch to a tropical storm warning from Cabo Engano to Haiti. Also, a hurricane watch has now been issued from Cabo Beata to the Haiti.

At 1:45 p.m. EDT, the eye of the Hurricane Dean was 175 miles (282 km) west of Martinique and 300 miles (480 km) southeast of San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Tropical storm warnings continue to be in effect for the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico as the storm is moving west at 22 mph (35 km/h) and could intensify over the warmer waters toward Jamaica.

Dean is currently forecast to dump two inches (~50 mm) of rain on Haiti and the Dominican Republic, with a few isolated areas receiving a possible five inches (~130 mm).

The National Hurricane Center says it is too early to project whether the storm poses a threat to the U.S..

The storm moved through St. Lucia and Martinique today, causing structural damage, knocking out power, and flooding roads. Also, a 62-year-old man drowned today, being the storm’s first death.

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

August 16, 2007

Hurricane Dean is upgraded to a Category 2 storm

Hurricane Dean is upgraded to a Category 2 storm

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Thursday, August 16, 2007

Hurricane Dean as reported by NOAA

According to the National Hurricane Center, Hurricane Dean is now a Category 2 hurricane. The Atlantic’s first hurricane of the season had top sustained winds at 100 mph at 5 p.m. EDT. Dean’s winds were measured at 75 mph earlier in the day.

A meteorologist from the National Hurricane Center warns, “Dean is likely to become a major hurricane in the eastern Caribbean Sea.” Adding that one forecast shows it could become “an extremely dangerous Category 4 hurricane by the time it reaches the northwestern Caribbean Sea.”

Forecasters claim the storm could threaten the Lesser Antilles by Friday. Dean is then forecast to pass over Jamaica by 2 p.m. EDT Sunday, and then move across the Yucatan Peninsula and enter the Gulf of Mexico by Tuesday.

Hurricane warnings have been issues for the islands of St. Lucia and Dominica. The Barbados weather service has issued a tropical storm warning for the island of Barbados and a tropical storm watch for St. Vincent and St. Maarten.

Katherine Cesinger, a spokeswoman for Texas Governor Rick Perry said, “It’s so far out, but it’s not too early to start preparing…We have more notice than with Erin. We’re glad for that especially since [Dean] is projected to bring some strength.”

At 2 p.m. EDT, the storm was about 210 miles due east of Barbados and about 305 miles east of Martinique, according to the National Hurricane Center. It is moving west at 23 mph.

Hurricane Dean was officially named early this morning.

Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Powered by WordPress