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August 2, 2009

Body of missing Desert Storm pilot found in Iraq

Filed under: Iraq,Middle East,Politics and conflicts,War on Terror — admin @ 5:00 am
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Sunday, August 2, 2009

Captain Michael Speicher, USN
Image: United States Navy.

The remains of Michael “Scott” Speicher, the first American soldier to be shot down in the Persian Gulf War, have been discovered in Iraq after an 18-year search. Speicher, a Captain in the United States Navy, was flying over Iraq on January 17, 1991, when the Gulf War began. That night, his plane was shot down and he disappeared.

After the crash, there had been much confusion about the status of the downed pilot. Speicher had originally been declared dead by the Army, but since there were no remains found, the Pentagon eventually declared Speicher missing in action. After this, his official status was slightly changed, and was missing-captured, then changed back to missing in action again until today’s discovery.

Once the current war in Iraq began, searches for Speicher’s body began again. In 2003 and 2005, Army members searched a prison in Iraq and a graveyard in Baghdad, respectively, but found no definitive proof of any remains at those locations.

Last month, Army officials stated that an Iraqi citizen gave new information possibly leading to the remains of Speicher’s body. This led a group of Marines into Iraq’s province of Anbar, where more citizens told them that the remains were buried after the crash. The Marines were directed to what was believed to be the site of the crash, and found Speicher’s remains there. According to the Pentagon, “One of these Iraqi citizens stated that they were present when Captain Speicher was found dead at the crash site by Bedouins and his remains buried.” Speicher was awarded the rank of captain posthumously.

The remains were identified by the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, where a jaw bone was traced to Speicher. “I am…extremely grateful to all those who have worked so tirelessly over the last 18 years to bring Capt. Speicher home,” said US Navy Secretary Ray Mabus.

Sources


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

June 18, 2009

$106 billion war bill backed by U.S. House of Representatives

Thursday, June 18, 2009

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U.S. soldiers in Iraq
Background

The official seal of the House of Representatives

The United StatesHouse of Representatives backed a US$106 billion dollar (75 billion) war bill today. The Senate will take a look at the bill next. The bill would fund the war efforts in Iraq and Afghanistan. The final vote was 226-202 in favor of the bill. The bill will also give authorization for $108 billion for credit lines for the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

The bill will help to move President Barack Obama‘s plans to the next stage — namely reducing operations in Iraq and expanding in Afghanistan

The bill was tough to pass, with only five Republicans supporting it and thirty-two Democrats voting against. The lack of Republican support was due to the introduction of measures to provide $108 billion of new credit lines to the IMF, which they argue should have been part of a separate bill.

The bill also included compromises with regards to Guantanamo Bay, allowing suspects to be taken to the United States for questioning but not for permanent detention.


Sources



This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

April 9, 2009

18-year media ban on covering return of fallen soldiers lifted

Filed under: Media,United States,War on Terror — admin @ 5:00 am

Thursday, April 9, 2009

The return of United States war casualties
Image: Colin Mutchler (activefree).

The media were allowed to cover the return of an airman killed in Afghanistan on Monday, ending an 18-year ban that had prevented the publication of images of American war casualties.

The military allowed media access to the service in Dover Air Force Base in Delaware for the return of the body of Air Force Staff Sergeant Phillip Myers of Hopewell, of Virginia, after the family had given permission.

According to the Department of Defense, the 30-year-old airman was killed on April 4 near Helmand province, Afghanistan, after being hit with an improvised explosive device.

The ban had been enacted by President George H. W. Bush in 1991 during the Persian Gulf War, apparently as a way to shield grieving families. But critics claimed the ban was an attempt to hide the human cost of war. President Barack Obama had asked the United States Department of Defense for a review of the ban. Defense Secretary Robert Gates said he was “never comfortable” with the blanket restriction, according to USA Today.


Sources

  • David Kerley and Ki Mae Huessner “First Photos of Fallen Soldier Ends 18-Year Ban”. ABC News, April 6, 2009
  • JoAnne Allen and Philip Barbara “Media covers US war dead’s return after 18-year ban”. Reuters, April 6, 2009
  • Randall Chase “Media witness return of war casualty at Dover”. The Seattle Times, April 6, 2009
  • Randall Chase “After 18-year ban, media see return of US war dead”. Yahoo! News, April 6, 2009
  • “US lifts ban on war dead photos”. BBC News, February 26, 2009
  • “US permits war dead coverage”. Al Jazeera, April 6, 2009
  • Andrea Stone “Ban on photos of U.S. troops’ coffins lifted”. USA Today, February 27, 2009
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

April 4, 2009

13 killed in U.S. air strike in Pakistan

Saturday, April 4, 2009

Map of Waziristan, Pakistan

Other stories from Pakistan
…More articles here
Location of Pakistan

A map showing the location of Pakistan

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Pakistan, see the Pakistan Portal

A suspected United States drone missile attack in northwestern Pakistan has left 13 people dead, local security officials say.

The strike hit a town in the tribal area of North Waziristan, near the Afghan border, an apparent stronghold of Al-Qaeda militants.

“Thirteen people were killed. Ten of them are militants and the identity of the other three — whether they are militants or civilians — is not yet confirmed,” a local official told AFP, asking to remain anonymous.

“The missile hit a house where some guests were staying. We have information that 13 people were killed including some guests,” an intelligence official stated.

The apparent target was the home of Tariq Khan, a local Wazir tribesman, who has been described as a ‘facilitator of the Taliban‘.

Pakistan has repeatedly condemned the U.S. drone attacks. Just two days prior to this latest attack, foreign ministry spokesman Abdul Basit told a press briefing that “they are violations of our sovereignty and secondly they are counterproductive. They are not helpful in our efforts to win hearts and minds. So we cannot accept drone attacks,” he said.

US special envoy Richard Holbrooke is scheduled to visit Pakistan next week and this issue will be discussed, according to Basit.

More than 35 suspected drone attacks have killed over 340 people since August last year.


Related articles

Sources

  • “‘Deadly Air Strike’ in Pakistan”. BBC News, April 4, 2009
  • “U.S. drone fires missile in Pakistan, kills 13: officials”. Reuters, April 4, 2009
  • “‘US drone’ hits Pakistan compound”. Al Jazeera, April 4, 2009
  • “Suspected US strike kills 13 in Pakistan”. Agence France-Presse, April 4, 2009
  • “13 killed in US drone attack in Miranshah”. Geo TV, April 4, 2009
  • “Pakistan to discuss drone attacks with US”. Agence France-Presse, April 2, 2009
  • Bill Roggio “US strikes Haqqani Network in North Waziristan”. The Long War Journal, April 4, 2009
  • Robert Birsel “U.S. missile kills 13 in Pakistan”. Reuters, April 4, 2009


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

13 killed in U.S. air strike in Pakistan

Saturday, April 4, 2009

Map of Waziristan, Pakistan

Other stories from Pakistan
…More articles here
Location of Pakistan

A map showing the location of Pakistan

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Pakistan, see the Pakistan Portal

A suspected United States drone missile attack in northwestern Pakistan has left 13 people dead, local security officials say.

The strike hit a town in the tribal area of North Waziristan, near the Afghan border.

“Thirteen people were killed. Ten of them are militants and the identity of the other three — whether they are militants or civilians — is not yet confirmed,” a local official told AFP, asking to remain anonymous.

“The missile hit a house where some guests were staying. We have information that 13 people were killed including some guests,” an intelligence official stated.

The apparent target was the home of Tariq Khan, a local Wazir tribesman, who has been described as a ‘facilitator of the Taliban‘.

More than 35 suspected drone attacks have killed over 340 people since August last year.


Related articles

Sources

  • “‘Deadly Air Strike’ in Pakistan”. BBC News, April 4, 2009
  • “U.S. drone fires missile in Pakistan, kills 13: officials”. Reuters, April 4, 2009
  • “‘US drone’ hits Pakistan compound”. Al Jazeera, April 4, 2009
  • “Suspected US strike kills 13 in Pakistan”. Agence France-Presse, April 4, 2009
  • “13 killed in US drone attack in Miranshah”. Geo TV, April 4, 2009
  • Bill Roggio “US strikes Haqqani Network in North Waziristan”. The Long War Journal, April 4, 2009
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

March 13, 2009

Obama administration drops use of term “enemy combatant”

Friday, March 13, 2009

Other stories from United States
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Location of United States

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The administration of United States President Barack Obama issued a court order Friday dropping “enemy combatant” as a term to describe those held in the U.S. military prison in Guantánamo Bay.

The move is a symbolic gesture that has been widely seen as a break from the administration of former President George W. Bush, which made the term an important aspect of his legal construct for dealing with terrorism suspects.

The United States Department of Justice filed the order in response to a federal judge’s order seeking a definition of the term. Judges have said the definition will play a key role in determining whether the government has justified the confinement of many detainees who are challenging their status in U.S. District Court.

The Justice Department said it would only seek to detain those who “substantially supported” the Taliban, Al Qaeda or associated groups that participated in the September 11 terrorist attacks. The term “substantially supported” was not defined, but that classification would not include groups who “provide unwitting or insignificant support” to terror groups, according to court papers.

“The particular facts and circumstances justifying detention will vary from case to case, and may require the identification and analysis of various analogues from traditional international armed conflicts,” government lawyers wrote in court papers. “Accordingly, the contours of the ‘substantial support’ and ‘associated forces’ bases of detention will need to be further developed in their application to concrete facts in individual cases.”

This, too, was a break from the Bush administration, which has argued it can detain those who provided support to those groups, as well as those who “engaged in hostilities” against the United States and its allies.

Captives from the U.S. military prison in Guantánamo Bay in January 2002.

Although detainees have argued in lawsuits that only those directly involved in terrorist hostilities should be held, the Justice Department filing continues to assert Obama’s authority to hold detainees even if they were not captured on the battlefield. However, Obama says he will rely on that authority from Congress and international laws of war, not the wartime authority that Bush claimed which stemmed from congressional authorization.

Obama plans to close the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base detention camp within a year and determine where to place the 240 detainees currently held there.

“As we work towards developing a new policy to govern detainees, it is essential that we operate in a manner that strengthens our national security, is consistent with our values and is governed by law,” said Attorney General Eric Holder in a statement.


Related articles

Sources

  • Del Quentin Wilber and Carrie Johnson “Obama Administration Abandons Use of Term ‘Enemy Combatant'”. The Washington Post, March 13, 2009
  • Nedra Pickler “Obama admin. to end use of term ‘enemy combatant'”. Associated Press, March 13, 2009
  • Randall Mikkelsen “U.S. drops “enemy combatant” as basis for detention”. Reuters, March 13, 2009
  • Terry Frieden “U.S. reverses policy, drops ‘enemy combatant’ term”. CNN, March 13, 2009


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Obama administration drops use of term “enemy combatant”

Friday, March 13, 2009

Other stories from United States
…More articles here
Location of United States

A map showing the location of United States

To write, edit, start or view other articles on United States, see the United States Portal

The administration of United States President Barack Obama issued a court order Friday dropping “enemy combatant” as a term to describe those held in the U.S. military prison in Guantánamo Bay.

The move is a symbolic gesture that has been widely seen as a break from the administration of former President George W. Bush, which made the term an important aspect of his legal construct for dealing with terrorism suspects.

The United States Department of Justice filed the order in response to a federal judge’s order seeking a definition of the term. Judges have said the definition will play a key role in determining whether the government has justified the confinement of many detainees who are challenging their status in U.S. District Court.

The Justice Department said it would only seek to detain those who “substantially supported” the Taliban, Al Qaeda or associated groups that participated in the September 11 terrorist attacks. The term “substantially supported” was not defined, but that classification would not include groups who “provide unwitting or insignificant support” to terror groups, according to court papers.

“The particular facts and circumstances justifying detention will vary from case to case, and may require the identification and analysis of various analogues from traditional international armed conflicts,” government lawyers wrote in court papers. “Accordingly, the contours of the ‘substantial support’ and ‘associated forces’ bases of detention will need to be further developed in their application to concrete facts in individual cases.”

This, too, was a break from the Bush administration, which has argued it can detain those who provided support to those groups, as well as those who “engaged in hostilities” against the United States and its allies.

Captives from the U.S. military prison in Guantánamo Bay in January 2002.

Although detainees have argued in lawsuits that only those directly involved in terrorist hostilities should be held, the Justice Department filing continues to assert Obama’s authority to hold detainees even if they were not captured on the battlefield. However, Obama say he will rely on that authority from Congress and international laws of war, not the wartime authority that Bush claimed which stemmed from congressional authorization.

Obama plans to close the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base detention camp within a year and determine where to place the 240 detainees currently held there.

“As we work towards developing a new policy to govern detainees, it is essential that we operate in a manner that strengthens our national security, is consistent with our values and is governed by law,” said Attorney General Eric Holder in a statement.


Related articles

Sources

  • Del Quentin Wilber and Carrie Johnson “Obama Administration Abandons Use of Term ‘Enemy Combatant'”. The Washington Post, March 13, 2009
  • Nedra Pickler “Obama admin. to end use of term ‘enemy combatant'”. Associated Press, March 13, 2009
  • Randall Mikkelsen “U.S. drops “enemy combatant” as basis for detention”. Reuters, March 13, 2009
  • Terry Frieden “U.S. reverses policy, drops ‘enemy combatant’ term”. CNN, March 13, 2009
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

February 6, 2009

British court ‘threatened’ by United States

Friday, February 6, 2009

Politics and conflicts
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Politics and conflicts
More information about Politics and conflicts on Wikipedia:

Judges in England’s High Court of Justice have said that the United States threatened to withdraw anti-terrorism intelligence cooperation if they revealed part of a Guantanamo Bay detainee’s case.

However, UK Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs David Miliband denied the threat had occurred, telling the House of Commons that it was usual practice for intelligence material to remain controlled by the country that collected it. He reaffirmed that the British government did not want the material released because doing so would “cause real and significant damage to the national security and international relations of this country”.

Binyam Mohamed, a British resident but not a citizen, was arrested by U.S. forces in Pakistan in 2002. From there, he claims, he was moved to other locations where he was tortured on behalf of U.S. operatives (a process known as “extraordinary rendition“) with the knowledge of UK intelligence agencies before being sent to the detention centre at Guantanamo Bay. The U.S. said he had planned a “dirty bomb” terrorist attack, but, after holding him for 4 years under the threat of the death penalty, dropped the charges.

Mohamed says that any evidence against him was based on what he said under torture and asked the High Court to force the government to reveal any documentation they held that would prove this. The judges have agreed, but have not published the material. Following the Foreign Secretary’s statement to parliament, Mohamed’s lawyers have written to the court to ask the judges to now publish. They say that, since Milliband has denied that the United States made the threat, the judges’ decision to withhold it no longer applied.

File photo of captives in Guantanamo Bay in 2002
Image: Shane T. McCoy.

Mohamed claims to have spent 550 days being tortured for information in Morocco. He says his genitals were repeatedly cut with a razor blade to make him confess. The court case in London is part of his bid to force the UK government to release evidence it holds that he claims shows the U.S. was directly involved in the torture. A British official was also present when he was tortured, he claims.

The court case and the British government’s reaction to it comes at a time when British politicians are adjusting to a new relationship with their American counterparts. The UK was a solid supporter of former President George W. Bush’s “war on terror“, but the British government now faces building a relationship with the new U.S. administration which was elected with plans for a different approach to the subject. The British government has repeatedly denied that it was involved in “extraordinary rendition” and evidence otherwise would be politically damaging.


Sources

  • Robert Verkaik and Nigel Morris “Ministers ‘misled’ judges over torture evidence”. The Independent, February 6, 2009
  • “Foreign secretary defends secrecy over terror suspect torture row”. The Daily Record, February 6, 2009
  • “Court pressed on ‘torture’ case”. BBC News Online, February 6, 2009
  • Matthew Moore “Terror evidence row: Binyam Mohamed Q&A”. The Daily Telegraph, February 5, 2009


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

January 12, 2009

Wikinews Shorts: January 12, 2009

A compilation of brief news reports for Monday, January 12, 2009.

Contents

Help Wikinews! Contribute to Wikinews by expanding these briefs or add a new one.

Madoff to remain free on bail

A federal court in New York, New York ruled today that American financier Bernard Madoff can remain free on a US$10 million bond. Madoff faces charges of securities fraud in case that may reveal losses as large as US$50 billion. He was originally arrested on December 11, 2008.

Federal prosecutors had argued that Madoff had violated terms of his bail by mailing valuables from his Manhattan apartment, where he is under house arrest, to relatives.

Judge Ronald Ellis ruled that, “The government fails to provide sufficient evidence that any potential future dissemination of Madoff’s assets would rise to the level of an economic harm.”

The judge, however, did say that “it is appropriate that his ability to transfer property be restricted as completely as possible.” Madoff will be required to submit a complete inventory of items in his apartment.

Related news

  • “Market maker Bernard L. Madoff arrested in $50B ‘giant Ponzi scheme'”. Wikinews, December 12, 2008

Sources

  • David Glovin and Erik Larson “Madoff Will Remain Free on Bail, Judge Rules; U.S. to Appeal”. Bloomberg L.P., January 12, 2009
  • Larry Neumeister “Financier Madoff stays in penthouse, avoids jail”. Associated Press, January 12, 2009

Obama will close Guantanamo Bay in his first week say advisers

Obama and George W. Bush in the Oval Office on November 10, 2008.

President-elect of the United States Barack Obama will order the closure of the Guantanamo Bay detention camp as soon as the first week of his Presidency. This is according to two sources close to the Obama transition team who spoke to Associated Press

On Sunday, Obama told ABC‘s This Week: “It is more difficult than I think a lot of people realize and we are going to get it done, but part of the challenge that you have is that you have a bunch of folks that have been detained, many of whom who may be very dangerous who have not been put on trial or have not gone through some adjudication.”

Barack Obama is to be inauguarted on January, 20, 2009.

Sources

  • Ed Henry “Obama to close Guantanamo Bay prison quickly”. CNN, January 12, 2009
  • Ewen MacAskill “Obama to issue order to close Guantánamo in first week as president”. guardian.co.uk, January 12, 2009

Greek shipping magnate kidnapped in Athens

Superfast Ferries’ Superfast XI bound for Ancona passes Kefalonia island (file photo).
Image: linz ellinas.

Pericles Panagopoulos, the president of Greek ferry operator Attica Group, which runs Superfast Ferries, was abducted near his home in Athens on Monday by three men armed with Kalashnikov assault rifles, as he was being driven to work in a coastal suburb. No-one was injured in the incident, which is being investigated by anti-terrorist police.

Sources

  • “Shipping magnate seized in Greece”. BBC News Online, January 12, 2009
  • John Carr “Armed gang kidnaps Greek shipping tycoon Pericles Panagopoulos”. The Times, January 12, 2009
  • George Hatzidakis “Prominent Greek ship owner abducted by armed men”. Reuters, January 12, 2009

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

October 30, 2008

General supervising Guantanamo Prosecutions the subject of two ethics probes

Thursday, October 30, 2008

Brigadier General, Thomas W. Hartmann, USAFR

Brigadier General Thomas W. Hartmann, an officer in the United States Air Force Reserve is the subject of two new ethics inquiries.

Hartmann was recalled to active duty in July 2007, and appointed the Legal Advisor to the civilian official — known as “the Convening Authority” — in charge of Office of Military Commissions.

The duties of the Convening Authority included providing general oversight of the Prosecution and Defense teams, and providing advice to the convening authority when appeals are made.

When Hartmann was appointed the Chief Prosecutor, Colonel Morris Davis was on medical leave. Hartmann was dissatisfied with the process of the commissions. In the nine months since the passage of the Military Commissions Act of 2006 only three captives had been charged. Hartmann is reported to have intervened in the operation of the Prosecution, pressuring Prosecutors to initiate charges against the captives suspected of being the more senior members of al-Qaeda.

When Davis returned from his medical leave he and Hartmann clashed. He felt Hartmann had improperly stepped outside his assigned duties, and had usurped his own role.

Davis reported that his approach had been to charge captives whose trials could be conducted without access to secret evidence, and without access to evidence coerced through the use of torture or questionable interrogation techniques.

Brigadier General Thomas W. Hartmann tours Guantanamo.

In October 2007 Davis went public, and suggested that both he and Hartmann resign from the Office of Military Commissions. A military inquiry at the time censured Davis, who did resign from the Office of Military Commissions, and has subsequently testified against Hartmann.

The Presiding Officers of three of the Military Commissions heard testimony from Hartmann and eventually barred him from participation in the cases before them, because they believed he had exercised “illegal command influence”.

Stephen Henley, the Presiding Officer of Mohammed Jawad’s Commission barred Hartmann from participation he wrote:

“…a Legal Advisor’s post trial responsibilities necessitate he act in a quasi-judicial role; one where he must remain neutral and unbiased. The Commission finds the current Legal Advisor’s editorial writings and interviews defending the military commissions’ system combined with his active and vocal support of and desire to manage the military commissions process and public statements appearing to directly align himself with the prosecution team have compromised the objectivity necessary to dispassionately and fairly evaluate the evidence and prepare the post trial recommendation.”

After Patrick Parrish barred Hartmann from participation in Omar Khadr’s commission, Hartmann’s subordinate was promoted to replace him. Hartmann was moved to a new position, where he served over the Prosecution. Pentagon officials described it as a lateral move. Air Force officials described it as a promotion.


Sources

  • Dan Slater, Law Blog “Tribunal Supervisor Investigated for Abuse of Power at Gitmo”. The Wall Street Journal, October 27, 2008
  • Associated Press “Air Force Probes General For Actions at Guantanamo”. The Washington Post, October 26, 2008
  • “General investigated in Guantanamo cases”. United Press International, October 26, 2008
  • “Air force investigates Pentagon official over accusations of misconduct”. The Canadian Press, October 26, 2008
  • Josh Meyer “Guantanamo tribunals overseer under investigation”. Los Angeles Times, October 25, 2008
  • Michael Melia “Ex-Gitmo prosecutor charges Pentagon interference”. Toronto Star, October 20, 2008
  • Josh White “Ex-Prosecutor Alleges Pentagon Plays Politics”. The Washington Post, October 20, 2008
  • Mike Melia “Pentagon official removed from 2nd Gitmo trial”. Associated Press, August 14, 2008
  • Amy Goodman “Fmr. Chief Guantanamo Prosecutor Says Military Commissions “Not Justice””. Democracy Now!, July 16, 2008
  • Josh White “Colonel Says Speaking Out Cost A Medal”. The Washington Post, May 29, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
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