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January 12, 2015

Millions march in France and around the world in support of Charlie Hebdo

Millions march in France and around the world in support of Charlie Hebdo

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Monday, January 12, 2015

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Marchers in Paris.
Image: Yann Caradec.

Following the shootings at the offices of Charlie Hebdo, millions of people turned out yesterday for marches in Paris, in cities across France, and around the world. Reported estimates of between 1.5 and 2 million people rallied in Paris, and the French interior ministry estimated 3.7 million or more rallied across France.

44 world leaders attended the Paris march including French President François Hollande; German Chancellor Angela Merkel; British Prime Minister David Cameron; Spanish Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy; Italian Prime Minister Matteo Renzi; the President of Mali, Ibrahim Boubacar Keïta; Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu; Mahmoud Abbas, President of the Palestinian Authority; King Abdullah II and Queen Rania of Jordan; Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu; the Russian Foreign Minister, Sergey Lavrov; the Hungarian Prime Minister Viktor Orban; and the President of Gabon, Ali Bongo Ondimba.

US Ambassador to France Jane D. Hartley attended. White House Spokesman Josh Earnest responded to criticism for not sending a higher level representative on behalf of the United States: “It is fair to say we should have sent someone with a higher profile.” Earnest said the rally had been planned on Friday and President Obama attending the rally on such short notice presented “significant security challenges”. Secretary of State John Kerry said he already had a prior engagement in India.

Charlie Hebdo has previously published cartoons featuring the Islamic prophet Muhammed. These include original depictions and reprints of controversial cartoons originally by Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten. Some of these cartoons were on display at the marches.

Marche Charlie Hebdo Paris 07.jpg

Paris: flowers and tributes to the victims of the shooting.
Image: Guerric Poncet.

6 Marche républicaine 11 janvier 2015 Paris - Le crayon comme pancarte AB P1340202.jpg

Paris march: a protester holding up two colouring pencils, in solidarity with journalists and cartoonists killed in the attack.
Image: Basili.

Crayons libres 2.jpg

Paris march: protestors holding up two giant pencils.
Image: Eric Walter.

Les crayons.jpg

Paris march: more protestors holding up giant pencils.
Image: Eric Walter.

Foule en défilé.jpg

Paris march: marchers fill the street.
Image: Eric Walter.

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Paris march: more marchers filling the streets.
Image: Yann Caradec.

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Paris march.
Image: Eric Walter.

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Paris march: marchers moving up Boulevard Beaumarchais.
Image: Poulpy.

2 Marche républicaine 11 janvier 2015 Paris - Foule des manifestants quai station Mirosmenil AB P1340193.jpg

Paris march: marchers fill the platform at the Miromesnil Métro station.
Image: Basili.

Rassemblement de soutien à Charlie Hebdo - 11 janvier 2015 - Bordeaux 10.JPG

Bordeaux rally.
Image: LeJC.

Bourg-en-Bresse rally in support of the victims of the 2015 Charlie Hebdo shooting, 11 January 2015 (2).JPG

Rally in Bourg-en-Bresse.
Image: Benoît Prieur.

Marche républicaine 2015, Chambéry 9.JPG

Rally in Chambéry.
Image: Florian Pépellin.

Marche républicaine du 11 janvier 2015 à Lyon 49.JPG

Rally in Lyon.
Image: Jitrixis.

Manifestation en soutien à Charlie Hebdo et aux victimes des fusillades, Rennes, 2015-01-11-1.jpg

Rally in Rennes.
Image: Édouard Hue.

Manifestation en soutien à Charlie Hebdo et aux victimes des fusillades, Rennes, 2015-01-11-11.jpg

A sign at the march in Rennes showing a number of the Charlie Hebdo cartoons.
Image: Édouard Hue.

Manifestation en soutien à Charlie Hebdo et aux victimes des fusillades, Rennes, 2015-01-11-7.jpg

Rally in Rennes.
Image: Édouard Hue.

Rennes 11 janvier 2015 - Marche républicaine 03.jpg

Rally in Rennes.
Image: Pymouss.

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Rally at the Place Royale in Reims.
Image: G.Garitan.

French flag projected onto The National Gallery, Trafalgar Square, London.JPG

French flag projected on to the side of the National Gallery in London as a sign of solidarity.
Image: Simeon87.

Tributes to the victims.jpg

Signs, pens, sketch pads and cartoons left as a memorial in Trafalgar Square in London.
Image: Zefrog.

Participant holding a pen.jpg

A pen held up as part of the rally in London’s Trafalgar Square.
Image: Zefrog.

Je suis Charlie rally at Daley Plaza in Chicago, 11 January 2015 (5).jpg

A man holding both a French and American flag at a rally in Daley Plaza in Chicago.
Image: Stel Cape.

Cologne rally in support of the victims of the 2015 Charlie Hebdo shooting-191954.jpg

A small rally in Cologne.
Image: Raimond Spekking.

JeSuisCharlie in Moscow S0147494 (16255052582).jpg

Candle lights at a rally in Moscow.
Image: Ilya Schurov.

JeSuisCharlie in Moscow S0177502 (16070064457).jpg

Snow-covered flowers and tributes outside the office of the French Ambassador in Moscow.
Image: Ilya Schurov.

JeSuisCharlie in Moscow S0357555 (16068596810).jpg

At the rally in Moscow.
Image: Ilya Schurov.

Je suis Charlie, Stockholm 11 January 2015 (2).jpg

Rally in Stockholm.
Image: Henrik M F.

Stockholm rally in support of the victims of the 2015 Charlie Hebdo shooting (15).jpg

Rally in Stockholm.
Image: fcruse.

Stockholm rally in support of the victims of the 2015 Charlie Hebdo shooting (9).jpg

A pencil in the snow at the Stockholm rally.
Image: fcruse.

Wien - Gedenkkundgebung Gemeinsam gegen den Terror - Je Suis Charlie - I.jpg

Rally in Vienna.
Image: Haeferl.

Je suis Charlie, Berlin 11 January 2015 (2).jpg

Rally in Berlin.
Image: Tim.

Je suis Charlie, Brussels 11 January 2015 (122).jpg

Rally in Brussels.
Image: Miguel Discart.



Related news

  • “Twelve dead in shooting at offices of French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo” — Wikinews, January 7, 2015

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October 20, 2009

New Gabonese president names new government

New Gabonese president names new government

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Tuesday, October 20, 2009

Gabon
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Gabon’s new president Ali Ben Bongo has named his first government, after winning the country’s recent presidential elections.

Bongo has kept interim Prime Minister Paul Mba, who has served in the post since July when his predecessor stepped down to run against Bongo.

Paul Tongui remained the foreign minister. Jean Francois Ndoungou kept his job as interior minister. Angelique Ngoma was moved from her position as minister of families to the defense minister — the first time that a woman has held that post in Gabon.

President Bongo was defense minister in the previous government of his father, Omar Bongo, who died in June after ruling for forty years.

In all, a dozen members of the new government are veterans of the previous administration. However, Bongo has trimmed its size. Including himself and the prime minister, there are just 30 members of the new government. The previous administration had 44. Prime Minister Mba said the move “is aimed primarily at efficiency”.

Francois Engongah Owono is the secretary general of the presidency. Owono said that the new, smaller government will be more efficient and includes people determined to get everyone in Gabon working together for a better country.

Bongo was sworn in Saturday after a lengthy review of the August election that brought him to power. Opposition candidates filed suit to overturn the results, accusing electoral officials of vote fraud to benefit the ruling party. Gabon’s constitutional court recounted returns from more than 2,800 polling stations and confirmed Bongo’s win.

Most election observers believe the vote was fair, despite irregularities that included security forces at polling stations, some ballot boxes not being properly sealed, and the absence of opposition representatives during some vote counting.

Bongo has promised to improve health, education, and housing in Gabon and more equitably distribute oil revenue. Under his father, Gabon became the world’s sixth-largest oil exporter, but 70% of the population still live in poverty.



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October 13, 2009

Gabon court upholds presidential candidate Bongo’s win after protest

Filed under: Africa,Elections,Gabon,Politics and conflicts — admin @ 5:00 am

Tuesday, October 13, 2009

Gabon‘s constitutional court has upheld Ali Ben Bongo‘s win in the August presidential election. Nine opposition candidates had challenged those results, alleging vote fraud.

Location of Gabon in map of Africa (2006)
Image: Vardion and Rei-artur.

After recounting results from more than 2,800 polling stations, Gabon’s constitutional court confirmed the election of the son of the country’s long-time leader Omar Bongo. Announcing the results on state television, constitutional court president Marie Madeleine Mborantsuo reaffirmed Ali Ben Bongo’s win with nearly 42 percent of the vote.

Former interior minister Andre Mba Obame and opposition leader Pierre Mamboundou each finished with about 25% of the vote. But the recount changed their order, with Mamboundou now finishing slightly ahead of Obame.

Mborantsou said that the court annulled results from one polling station. With Bongo winning more votes than any of his opponents, she said his election as the president of the Republic of Gabon is confirmed.

The court’s decision was final, and cleared the way for the president-elect’s inauguration. The ruling rejects an electoral challenge by Obame, Mamboundou and other opposition candidates who accused electoral officials of massive vote fraud to benefit Bongo.

Obame has gone on a hunger strike to deplore what he called “the installation of an era of dictatorship” in Gabon. He says fraudulent results are a humiliation for the massive numbers of people who voted for change.

Bongo was considered the front-runner in the election since his father’s death in June, after 42 years in power.

Former colonial power France welcomed his election, saying the vote took place under “acceptable conditions.” Most electoral observers agree the vote was generally fair despite irregularities that included security forces at polling stations, some ballot boxes not being properly sealed, and the absence of opposition representatives during some vote counting.

When Bongo was first announced the winner following August’s vote, police disbursed opposition demonstrators in the capital with tear gas. Protesters in the city of Port Gentil burned the French Consulate and attacked offices of French and U.S. oil firms.

Police said three people were killed in that violence. Human-rights groups say at least 15 people were killed by security forces. Interim President Rose Francine Rogombe says an investigation is under way to determine who is responsible for that violence.



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Gabon court upholds presidential candidate Bongo\’s win after protest

Gabon court upholds presidential candidate Bongo’s win after protest

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Tuesday, October 13, 2009

Gabon
Other stories from Gabon
  • 31 January 2015: Millions march in France and around the world in support of Charlie Hebdo
  • 20 October 2009: New Gabonese president names new government
  • 18 October 2009: Ali Bongo sworn in as president of Gabon
  • 13 October 2009: Gabon court upholds presidential candidate Bongo’s win after protest
  • 8 June 2009: Gabonese president Omar Bongo dies at age 73
…More articles here
Location of Gabon

A map showing the location of Gabon

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Gabon, see the Gabon Portal
Flag of Gabon.svg

Gabon’s constitutional court has upheld Ali Ben Bongo’s win in the August presidential election. Nine opposition candidates had challenged those results, alleging vote fraud.

After recounting results from more than 2,800 polling stations, Gabon’s constitutional court confirmed the election of the son of the country’s long-time leader Omar Bongo. Announcing the results on state television, constitutional court president Marie Madeleine Mborantsuo reaffirmed Ali Ben Bongo’s win with nearly 42 percent of the vote.

Former interior minister Andre Mba Obame and opposition leader Pierre Mamboundou each finished with about 25% of the vote. But the recount changed their order, with Mamboundou now finishing slightly ahead of Obame.

Mborantsou said that the court annulled results from one polling station. With Bongo winning more votes than any of his opponents, she said his election as the president of the Republic of Gabon is confirmed.

The court’s decision was final, and cleared the way for the president-elect’s inauguration. The ruling rejects an electoral challenge by Obame, Mamboundou and other opposition candidates who accused electoral officials of massive vote fraud to benefit Bongo.

Obame has gone on a hunger strike to deplore what he called “the installation of an era of dictatorship” in Gabon. He says fraudulent results are a humiliation for the massive numbers of people who voted for change.

Bongo was considered the front-runner in the election since his father’s death in June, after 42 years in power.

Former colonial power France welcomed his election, saying the vote took place under “acceptable conditions.” Most electoral observers agree the vote was generally fair despite irregularities that included security forces at polling stations, some ballot boxes not being properly sealed, and the absence of opposition representatives during some vote counting.

When Bongo was first announced the winner following August’s vote, police disbursed opposition demonstrators in the capital with tear gas. Protesters in the city of Port Gentil burned the French Consulate and attacked offices of French and U.S. oil firms.

Police said three people were killed in that violence. Human-rights groups say at least 15 people were killed by security forces. Interim President Rose Francine Rogombe says an investigation is under way to determine who is responsible for that violence.



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June 8, 2009

Gabonese president Omar Bongo dies at age 73

Filed under: Africa,Archived,Gabon,Obituaries,Politics and conflicts — admin @ 5:00 am

Gabonese president Omar Bongo dies at age 73

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, June 8, 2009

Gabon
Other stories from Gabon
  • 31 January 2015: Millions march in France and around the world in support of Charlie Hebdo
  • 20 October 2009: New Gabonese president names new government
  • 18 October 2009: Ali Bongo sworn in as president of Gabon
  • 13 October 2009: Gabon court upholds presidential candidate Bongo’s win after protest
  • 8 June 2009: Gabonese president Omar Bongo dies at age 73
…More articles here
Location of Gabon

A map showing the location of Gabon

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Gabon, see the Gabon Portal
Flag of Gabon.svg

Omar Bongo in 2004

Omar Bongo, the president of the western African country of Gabon, has died at a clinic in Barcelona, Spain, according to the Gabonese prime minister.

Jean Eyeghe Ndong said that Bongo, the longest-serving leader of an African country, had died at the Quiron clinic on Monday, at the age of 73.

“At 2:30 pm, the medical team informed me, as well as the officials and members of the family present, that the president of the republic, head of state Omar Bongo Ondimba had just passed away following a heart attack,” Ndong said, adding that the president had been admitted to the clinic early in May.

“I noted at that time that the head of state whom I visited in the intensive care unit was alive and well.But we knew that the health of the president had become a source of concern in recent days,” he said.

According to Gabon’s constitution, the president of the senate is to become the interim ruler should the president die while in office. The senate’s president is Rose Francine Rogombe from the Gabonese Democratic Party. The constitution says new elections should take place within 45 days.



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January 19, 2009

Seven dead, one missing, two survive French helicopter crash off Gabon coast

Seven dead, one missing, two survive French helicopter crash off Gabon coast

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Gabon
Other stories from Gabon
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Location of Gabon

A map showing the location of Gabon

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Gabon, see the Gabon Portal
Flag of Gabon.svg

Monday, January 19, 2009

The FoudreLe TCD Foudre à quai à l’arsenal de Toulon (avril 2002).

Officials say that a French military helicopter with 10 French soldiers, including four crew members and six Special Forces paratroopers, has crashed off the coast of Gabon in west central Africa.

The Eurocopter AS 532 Cougar ditched shortly into the Atlantic Ocean after leaving a French naval ship, about 50 kilometres off the coast. Seven French soldiers were killed, two were rescued, and one is still missing, according to a statement issued by President Nicolas Sarkozy’s office.

“Today, the wreckage of the helicopter was located at a depth of 35 metres and searched. Unfortunately, we must report the deaths of five other soldiers. A final soldier remains missing. Searches are continuing,” the statement explained.

According to Libreville Lieutenant Colonel Pascal Carpentier, the ill-fated helicopter crashed Saturday night at 8:08 p.m. (1908 GMT) into Atlantic waters off Nyonie, a small town located between Gabon’s capital Libreville and the town of Port-Gentil. It was taking off from the amphibious assault ship La Foudre‘s naval landing craft transporter cruising 50 kilometers (30 miles) off the Gabonese coast, during a joint training exercise, said Lieutenant Colonel Francois-Marie Gougeon, spokesman for the general staff.

A French army Eurocopter AS 532 Cougar helicopter from the landing zone at the Kabul Military Training Center in Kabul, Afghanistan, March 15, 2007.

The ship “set off the alert and arrived at the crash site with rescuers who picked up the injured crew within half an hour. The sea was calm and the wind low at the time of the crash but the night was very dark,” Lieutenant Gougeon explained, adding that “search operations will naturally continue all night.” La Foudre, two helicopters and oil giant Total S.A.‘s three vessels, including its sonar and underwater robot joined the rescue effort of the salvage team.

“Divers were deployed to locate the wreckage,” said Captain Christophe Prazuck, spokesman for the army general staff. “At daybreak we will deploy all our means, planes, helicopters, boats… to take part in the search,” said Gabon’s Interior Minister André Mba Obame.

Meanwhile French President Nicolas Sarkozy directed Defence Minister Hervé Morin to travel to the crash site. Sarkozy had “asked that all available means in the area be immediately deployed to find the soldiers who were aboard.” Morin later announced there would be two probes, a judicial one and another by the French defence ministry, with the assistance of French gendarmes and an air accident expert.

Satellite image of Gabon, generated from raster graphics data supplied by The Map Library.

Minister Morin arrived in Libreville on Sunday and met with President Omar Bongo to discuss rescue efforts for the missing body of one of the seven soldiers. “The cause of this tragedy remains unknown. It may be natural or human, or a combination of both.” Morin said. “Divers were inspecting the Cougar, which was in water 35 meters (about 115 feet) deep. We will do everything we can to find the last person missing,” he added.

Morin viewed rescue efforts on La Foudre, and visited friends and relatives of the missing at Camp DeGaulle. The French soldiers were “permanent personnel in Gabon who knew the region well,” said General Claude Reglat, Gabon commander of French forces. “The six others were commandos who had arrived from the French army’s elite 13th Regiment of Dragon Paratroopers. We have expressed our compassion and solidarity to the families,” he added. “This type of helicopter does not have a black box. So the flight was not recorded, nor were the voices in the cockpit. So some elements will remain unknown,” Claude Reglat also noted.

The January 17-21 bilateral manoeuvres called ‘Operation N’Gari’ involved 600 French soldiers and 120 Gabonese troops maneuvering in the military drill known as Baptise Ngeri. The soldiers were backed by Cougar and Fennec helicopters to coordinate maritime safety operations with UN peacekeepers at Bouna airport, in the Ivory Coast. In the joint exercise soldiers were to be parachuted onto predetermined targets including Nyonie.

Gabon, a former French colony, hosts one of four permanent French bases in Africa. Gabon is a country in west central Africa sharing borders with the Gulf of Guinea to the west, Equatorial Guinea to the northwest, and Cameroon to the north, with the Republic of the Congo curving around the east and south. According the FFG which has around 1,000 troops in Gabon, the French Forces in Gabon (FFG)’s role is “to assure the safety of the 12,000 French residents in the country in case of threat, and carry out aid missions.”



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March 10, 2005

United Nations passes Declaration on human cloning

United Nations passes Declaration on human cloning

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Thursday, March 10, 2005

The declaration was passed at the UN general assembly

A divided UN General Assembly has voted to approve a nonbinding statement against all forms of human cloning.

The vote, held Tuesday, came after four years of debate and an end to attempts for an international ban.

In the 191-nation assembly, there were 84 votes in favor of a nonbinding statement, 34 against and 37 abstentions.

Proposed by Honduras, the statement was largely supported by Roman Catholic countries and opposed by countries with active embryonic stem cell research programs. Many Islamic nations abstained.

The UN Declaration on Human Cloning, as it is named, calls for all member states to adopt a ban on human cloning, which it says is “incompatible with human dignity and the protection of human life.”

The US, which has long pushed for a complete ban, voted in favor of the statement while traditional ally Britain, where therapeutic cloning is legal and regulated, voted against it.

The statement should have no impact on countries that allow therapeutic cloning, such as Britain and South Korea, as it is not legally binding.

“The foes of therapeutic cloning are trying to portray this as a victory for their ideology,” Bernard Siegel, a Florida attorney who lobbies to defend therapeutic cloning, said in a Reuters report. “But this confusing declaration is an effort to mask their failure last November to impose a treaty on the world banning therapeutic cloning.”

Breakdown of the vote

Of the 191 countries eligible to vote:

In favor

84 countries voted in favor of the declaration against cloning:

Afghanistan, Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brunei Darussalam, Burundi, Chile, Comoros, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Georgia, Germany, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lesotho, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Madagascar, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Federated States of Micronesia, Monaco, Morocco, Nicaragua, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Sudan, Suriname, Switzerland, Tajikistan, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uzbekistan, Zambia.

Against

34 countries voted against the declaration:

Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Canada, China, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People`s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Gabon, Iceland, India, Jamaica, Japan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Republic of Korea, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Thailand, Tonga, United Kingdom.

Abstention

37 countries abstained from voting on the declaration against cloning:

Algeria, Angola, Argentina, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Barbados, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Colombia, Egypt, Indonesia, Iran, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Malaysia, Maldives, Mongolia, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Oman, Pakistan, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Serbia and Montenegro, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Syria, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, Uruguay, Yemen, Zimbabwe.

Absent

36 countries were absent from and during the vote on the declaration against cloning:

Antigua and Barbuda, Armenia, Bhutan, Botswana, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Dominica, Fiji, Gambia, Ghana, Greece, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Libya, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nauru, Niger, Nigeria, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Russian Federation, Senegal, Seychelles, Swaziland, Togo, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Vietnam.

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