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December 2, 2008

Minyama residents promise to keep fighting to stop McDonald’s development

Tuesday, December 2, 2008

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Residents in Minyama, on Queensland, Australia’s Sunshine Coast, have vowed to keep fighting the development of a 24-hour McDonald’s on Nicklin Way. Last week, Sunshine Coast Regional Council officers recommended that construction be given the go ahead.

Councillor Chris Thompson, who represents Division 4 in the Sunshine Coast Regional Council, has said that he will recommend that it be rejected at the general committee meeting.

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“I’m pretty sure I’m the only councillor who already has a 24-hour McDonald’s in my division,” Councillor Thompson said, “we have enough issues with that one, and this is overkill.”

The 24-hour McDonald’s in Councillor Thompson’s division, in Mooloolaba, is part of a larger complex and does not back onto residential premises.

“I would have thought that the anti-social elements in society do not observe fixed days and hours,” protest group spokesman John Meyer-Gleaves said.

“And council says the problem associated with increased vehicle noise has been addressed by stating that parking will be in the front of the building.

“But all [drive-through] traffic goes around the back of the building and will impact on the residents of Chelsea Crescent.”

Local member of federal parliament Peter Slipper was emailed for comment but has yet to reply.


Sources

  • This article contains original reporting by Wikinews user RockerballAustralia. The reporting took place primarily on December 1, 2008 at Mooloolaba, Queensland. Further details can be found on this talk page. If the user is accredited, you can verify their credentials.
  • Alan Lander “Golden Arches not welcome”. Sunshine Coast Daily, December 1, 2008
  • “Minyama McDonalds gets nod”. Sunshine Coast Daily, November 27, 2008
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June 9, 2008

McDonald\’s pull sliced tomatoes from menu in US

McDonald’s pull sliced tomatoes from menu in US

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Monday, June 9, 2008

Tomatoes on a vine

McDonald’s Corp. has temporarily pulled tomatoes from its sandwiches in the United States. They stated a precautionary move in the wake of a salmonella outbreak. At least 145 people in around 16 states have been infected with the bacteria known as Salmonella Saintpaul. The sandwiches affected are the premium chicken sandwiches and the Big N’ Tasty burger.

Raw cherry tomatoes and grape tomatoes don’t present a problem, the FDA says. McDonald’s said it will continue to serve grape tomatoes in its premium salads.



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May 25, 2008

French Fry \’king\’ J. R. Simplot dies at age 99

French fry ‘king’ J. R. Simplot dies at age 99

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Sunday, May 25, 2008

J. R. Simplot, french fry “king” & founder of the J. R. Simplot Company, an agricultural supplier specializing in potato products has died today in Boise, Idaho. He was 99 years old.

He was born John Richard “Jack” Simplot on January 4, 1909 in Dubuque, Iowa, United States. By World War II, the J. R. Simplot Company had become the largest shipper of fresh potatoes in the nation. By the early 1960s it was the primary supplier of french fries to McDonald’s; by 2005 it supplied more than half of all french fries for the fast food chain. Simplot also produced fertilizers for agriculture.

In 1961, Simplot financed the Brundage Mountain ski area area near McCall, two hours north of Boise. The Simplot Company sold its 50% interest in Brundage in April 2006 to the longtime co-owner, the DeBoer family.

Simplot is survived by his wife, Esther.



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January 28, 2008

UK allows corporations to award high school credits

UK allows corporations to award high school credits

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Monday, January 28, 2008

A McDonald’s in Exeter.
Image: Billy Hicks.

The government of the United Kingdom has given corporations like fast food chain McDonald’s the right to award high school qualifications to employees who complete a company training program.

Two other businesses, railway firm Network Rail and regional airline Flybe, were also approved. The decision was made by the Qualifications and Curriculum Authority, which oversees the national curriculum.

McDonald’s said it will offer a “basic shift manager” course, which will train staff in marketing, customer service, and other areas of restaurant management. Completion of this course will be the equivalent of passing the GCSE, the standard exam taken at age 16, or the Advanced Level, taken at age 18.

Network Rail plans to offer a course in rail engineering, while Flybe is developing a course involving aircraft engineering and cabin crew training. Passing Flybe’s course could result a university level degree.

Prime Minister Gordon Brown supports the plan. “It is going to be a tough course, but once you have got a qualification in management you can probably go anywhere,” Brown said. He emphasized the importance of higher education, saying, “Every young person needs a skill and to think about going to college, doing an apprenticeship or university.”

John Denham, Secretary of State for Innovation, Universities and Skills, called the decision “an important step towards ending the old divisions between company training schemes and national qualifications” and said it will “benefit employees, employers and the country as a whole.”

However, some people are unsure of the plan’s effectiveness. Sally Hunt, general secretary of the University and College Union, said, “We are unsure whether those institutions would be clamoring to accept people with McQualifications,” using a derogatory term for the program.



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May 25, 2007

McDonald\’s petitions Oxford English Dictionary to remove the word McJob

McDonald’s petitions Oxford English Dictionary to remove the word McJob

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Friday, May 25, 2007

A McDonald’s restaurant in Exeter in Devon, UK.
Image: Billy Hicks.

The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) defines McJob as “an unstimulating, low-paid job with few prospects.” The McDonald’s fast-food giant has begun a campaign to have the word removed from the dictionary, or to have its definition changed, by lobbying British MPs. The company has also set up an online petition with the slogan “Change the definition. Sign the petition.”

Clive Betts, MP for Sheffield Attercliffe agrees with the restaurant chain. Betts has tabled a Commons motion on the issue. The motion has so far gained the support of 15 other MPs.

It is indicating that the jobs they are doing are worthless, that anyone could just walk in off the street and do them, that all workers are untrained. We do need well trained staff with good customer relations and I think the description is derogatory. The hospitality industry is very important to this country. The people who work there are the public face of this country to millions of tourists who come here every year. One thing I am interested to hear from McDonald’s is that they do train their staff. They put a lot of effort into that.
 
— Clive Betts, MP

The compilers of the OED point out that they merely record the description of how the word is used, rather than prescribe how it should be used. The term, McJob, has been in usage at least 20 years, they say. It was popularised in 1991 in Douglas Coupland’s novel Generation X: Tales for an Accelerated Culture as one of the margin definitions. Here it was described as “a low-pay, low-prestige, low-dignity, low benefit, no-future job in the service sector. Frequently considered a satisfying career choice by people who have never held one.”

In 2003, Merriam-Webster included McJob in the Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary, and defined it as “a low-paying job that requires little skill and provides little opportunity for advancement.” This definition prompted a letter from then CEO Jim Cantalupo who said it was “an inaccurate description of restaurant employment” and “slap in the face” of restaurant employees.

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