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December 1, 2013

All plane occupants die in Namibia crash

All plane occupants die in Namibia crash

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Sunday, December 1, 2013

Disasters and accidents

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The wreckage of a crashed plane carrying by various reports 33 or 34 occupants has been found in Namibia but none of its passengers or crew survived, police in the country said yesterday. LAM Mozambique Airlines Flight 470 took off from the Mozambique capital‘s airport at 11:26 CAT (0926 UTC) Friday and was scheduled to reach an airport in Luanda, the capital of Angola, at 14:10 WAT (1310 UTC).

The remains of the plane were discovered at Bwabwata National Park in Namibia, close to the borders between Angola and Botswana. Kavango Region police coordinator Willie Bampton reportedly said yesterday: “My team on the ground have found the wreckage. No survivors. The plane is totally burned”. A nearby game ranger with the surname Shinonge described bodies being “scattered all over the place”, adding, “It’s a horrible sight”. Shinonge also said investigators managed to find and recover the aircraft’s black boxes.

In the immediate aftermath of the incident, when the aircraft’s exact location was unknown, LAM Mozambique Airlines stated: “Information obtained indicates that the flight has landed in a location in Northern Namibia, bordering Angola and Botswana near a place called Rundu.” However, the airline later confirmed the plane had in fact crashed. “At this time, our thoughts and prayers are with the families and loved ones of the passengers and crew who were on board the aircraft. LAM has established family assistance centres at Maputo and Luanda airports to support the families who are naturally distressed”, a further statement from the company said. Authorities from Namibia, Angola, Botswana, and South Africa were thanked by the airline for their assistance in the search for the plane.

The plane reportedly had a crew of six and 27 or 28 passengers. Ten of the passengers were Mozambique nationals, while nine were from Angola and five were from Portugal. One passenger from each of France, Brazil and China were also onboard.

The exact cause of the crash is unknown, although officials in Mozambique said weather and visibility were poor on Friday. In a statement, LAM Mozambique Airlines said: “We do not have any information on the circumstances of the accident and we cannot speculate on possible causes as the investigators must be given the time and space to do their work without interference or prejudice.”



Sources

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

September 3, 2012

Fifteen medals awarded on London Paralympics fourth night of track and field

Fifteen medals awarded on London Paralympics fourth night of track and field

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Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, September 3, 2012

2012 Summer Paralympics

Trafalgar Square, London - London 2012 - countdown clock.jpg

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London, England— Fifteen Paralympic gold medals were awarded Sunday night, the fourth night of competition at London’s Olympic Park.

As runners raced around the track, a ‘wall of sound’ from the crowd followed them. Given the potential for confusion about Paralympic classification, commentators and video screens provided repeated explanations of relevant classifications. In the centre of the field, during the men’s 400 metre heats and other finals, javelin competitors’ efforts were greeted with “oohs and aahs” from the stadium whilst their throws were in-flight; a remote-controlled car was used to return javelins to the competitors. Great Britain‘s win in the discus final prompted the crowd to sing along to the national anthem during the medal ceremony. No other country enjoyed quite the same level of flag waving and singing during subsequent medal ceremonies.

Athletics gets under way with a javelin player warming up
Image: Laura Hale.

The car retrieves the javelins
Image: Laura Hale.

400m T12 Men Heat 1 enters the stadium
Image: Laura Hale.

400m T12 Men Heat 2 enters the stadium
Image: Laura Hale.

Officials prepare for the start of the 400m T12 Men Heat 2
Image: Laura Hale.

Spanish runners enter the field of play for the start of 400m T12 Men Heat 3
Image: Laura Hale.

Mahmoud Khaldi of Tunisia prepares for the start of the men’s 400m — T12 Heat 3
Image: Laura Hale.

Scoreboard during the men’s javelin F44 final showing China, Netherlands, France, Russia, India, Canada and the United States.
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 200 m final T11 is underway
Image: Laura Hale.

First place winner Brazilian Terezinha Guilhermina and her guide Guilherme Soares de Santana across the line in the women’s 200 m final T11 is underway
Image: Laura Hale.

A Great Britain athlete gets his medal for discus in an event held earlier in the Games
Image: Laura Hale.

Runners sprint towards the finish mens 200m T46
Image: Laura Hale.

Men’s 100 m T36 final get off the mark
Image: Laura Hale.

Men’s 100 m T36 final cross the line
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 100 m T52 final
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 100 m T52 final
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 100 m T52 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 100 m T12 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 100 m T12 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 100 m T12 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Clegg celebrates her medal
Image: Laura Hale.

Simon Patmore of Australia gets his medal from a final earlier in the day
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 400 m T53
Image: Laura Hale.

The women’s 100 m T37 starts
Image: Laura Hale.

The women’s 100 m T37 is almost done
Image: Laura Hale.

Mandy Francois-Elie of France and Johanna Benson of Namibia
Image: Laura Hale.

Mandy Francois-Elie of France and Johanna Benson of Namibia
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 100 m T54 final
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 100 m T54 final
Image: Laura Hale.

The crowd when Great Britain’s Libby as given her silver medal
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 200 m T44 final which Oscar Pistorius ran in
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 200 m T44 final which Oscar Pistorius ran in
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 200 m T44 final which Oscar Pistorius ran in
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 200 m T44 final which Oscar Pistorius ran in
Image: Laura Hale.

A discus is delivered back to an athlete
Image: Laura Hale.

French athletes sing along to the national anthem as Mandy Francois-Elie gets her gold
Image: Laura Hale.

A race towards the finish in the men’s 400 m T13 event
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 100 m T44 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 100 m T44 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 100 m T44 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 100 m T53 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 100 m T53 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Women, competing in the two blind classification finals, ran almost-exclusively with male guide runners. The entrants in the men’s F11 discus competition also had guides helping position them on the field, and ensuring they threw onto the field of play.

Preceded by heats for the men’s 400 metres T12 event, the first final of the night was the women’s 200 metres T11, won by Brazilian Terezinha Guilhermina with her guide Guilherme Soares de Santana.

In the women’s 100 metres T12 final, that Chinese competitor Guohua Zhou and her guide Jie Li finished first was of secondary importance to the home crowd, whose cheers grew louder following the announcement that Great Britain’s Libby Clegg, and guide-runner Mikhail Huggins, came in second. The pair did a celebratory lap around the stadium, briefly stopping as a medal was awarded for one of the earlier events. At the end of their victory lap, Clegg hugged her coach whilst Huggins knuckle-bumped athletes standing at the edge of the stadium before being joined by Clegg for hugs from team-mates.

Whilst Katrina Hart and Jenny McLoughlin of Great Britain received the loudest cheers when announced for the women’s 100 metres T37 event, Namibia’s Johanna Benson was also vocally encouraged by the crowd; starting without the use of blocks, she earned a silver, finishing behind France‘s Mandy Francois-Elie by 15 hundredths of a second. There was a delay in announcing the bronze medallist, ultimately Neda Bahi of Tunisia, because of the closeness of the finish which came down to a hundredth of a second separating her from fourth-placed Maria Seifert of Germany. Later in the night, immediately following Oscar Pistorius‘s 200 metres T44 final, Francois-Elie was awarded her gold medal whilst French athletes loudly sang their national anthem.

Pistorius’s race was near the end of the programme, with the announcer hyping it throughout the evening’s competition. When the announcer said Pistorius had entered the field of play, the crowd screamed. As he finally stepped up to be introduced the volume increased, and cameras flashed around the stadium. Pistorius ran his race taking the silver, losing to Brazilian Alan Fonteles Cardoso Oliveira by less than a tenth of a second.

Australians had a successful night, with Carlee Beattie earning a silver in the women’s long jump F46 event, Kurt Fearnley earning a silver in the men’s 5,000 metres T54, Angela Ballard earning a bronze in the women’s 100 metres T53 event and Simon Patmore earning bronze in the men’s 200 metres T46 event. Ballard, competing in her fourth Games, said following her race: “It’s really good especially after how I did at Beijing. So to go home with a medal is great. Hopefully I can do more with that over the rest of the week.”

Hosts Great Britain had a better night, earning a number of medals including David Weir taking gold in the men’s 5,000 metres T54, Graeme Ballard silver in the men’s 100 metres T36, Libby Clegg and her guide runner Mikhail Huggins winning silver in the women’s 100 metres T12.

Current leader in medals China added more to their tally, including gold and silver for Lisha Huang and Honghuan Zhou in the women’s 100 metres T53 event, gold in the women’s 100 metres T12 for Guohua Zhou and her guide Jie Li, silver for Yang Liu in the men’s 100 metres T54, a bronze taken by Juntingxian Jia and guide Donglin Xu in the women’s 200 metres T11 and a bronze in the women’s long jump T46 for Jingling Ouyang.

The United States picked up a few additional medals too, including a gold earned by Raymond Martin, a bronze taken by Paul Nitz in the men’s 100 metres T52 event, bronze for April Holmes in the women’s 100 metres T53 event and bronze for Blake Leeper in the men’s 200 metres T44 event.



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

September 2, 2012

15 medals awarded on fourth night of track and field at London Paralympics

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, September 2, 2012

2012 Summer Paralympics

Trafalgar Square, London - London 2012 - countdown clock.jpg

Newest 2012 Paralympic stories

London, England— Fifteen Paralympic gold medals were awarded Sunday night, the fourth night of competition at London’s Olympic Park.

As runners raced around the track, a ‘wall of sound’ from the crowd followed them. Given the potential for confusion about Paralympic classification, commentators and video screens provided repeated explanations of relevant classifications. In the centre of the field, during the men’s 400 metre heats and other finals, javelin throwers’ efforts were greeted with “ooohs and ahhhs” from the stadium whilst javelins were in-flight; a remote-controlled car was used to return javelins to competitors. Great Britain’s win in the discus final prompted the crowd to sing along to the national anthem during the medal ceremony. No other country enjoyed quite the same level of flag waving and singing during subsequent medal ceremonies.

Athletics gets under way with a javelin player warming up
Image: Laura Hale.

The car retrieves the javelins
Image: Laura Hale.

400m T12 Men Heat 1 enters the stadium
Image: Laura Hale.

400m T12 Men Heat 2 enters the stadium
Image: Laura Hale.

Officials prepare for the start of the 400m T12 Men Heat 2
Image: Laura Hale.

Spanish runners enter the field of play for the start of 400m T12 Men Heat 3
Image: Laura Hale.

Mahmoud Khaldi of Tunisia prepares for the start of the men’s 400m — T12 Heat 3
Image: Laura Hale.

Scoreboard during the men’s javelin F44 final showing China, Netherlands, France, Russia, India, Canada and the United States.
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 200 m final T11 is underway
Image: Laura Hale.

First place winner Brazilian Terezinha Guilhermina and her guide Guilherme Soares de Santana across the line in the women’s 200 m final T11 is underway
Image: Laura Hale.

A Great Britain athlete gets his medal for discus in an event held earlier in the Games
Image: Laura Hale.

Runners sprint towards the finish mens 200m T46
Image: Laura Hale.

Men’s 100 m T36 final get off the mark
Image: Laura Hale.

Men’s 100 m T36 final cross the line
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 100 m T52 final
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 100 m T52 final
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 100 m T52 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 100 m T12 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 100 m T12 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 100 m T12 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Clegg celebrates her medal
Image: Laura Hale.

Simon Patmore of Australia gets his medal from a final earlier in the day
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 400 m T53
Image: Laura Hale.

The women’s 100 m T37 starts
Image: Laura Hale.

The women’s 100 m T37 is almost done
Image: Laura Hale.

Mandy Francois-Elie of France and Johanna Benson of Namibia
Image: Laura Hale.

Mandy Francois-Elie of France and Johanna Benson of Namibia
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 100 m T54 final
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 100 m T54 final
Image: Laura Hale.

The crowd when Great Britain’s Libby as given her silver medal
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 200 m T44 final which Oscar Pistorius ran in
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 200 m T44 final which Oscar Pistorius ran in
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 200 m T44 final which Oscar Pistorius ran in
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 200 m T44 final which Oscar Pistorius ran in
Image: Laura Hale.

A discus is delivered back to an athlete
Image: Laura Hale.

French athletes sing along to the national anthem as Mandy Francois-Elie gets her gold
Image: Laura Hale.

A race towards the finish in the men’s 400 m T13 event
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 100 m T44 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 100 m T44 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 100 m T44 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 100 m T53 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 100 m T53 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Women, competing in the two blind classification finals, ran almost-exclusively with male guide runners. The entrants in the men’s F11 discus competition also had guides helping position them on the field, and ensuring they threw onto the field of play.

Preceded by heats for the men’s 400 metres T12 event, the first final of the night was the women’s 200 metres T11, won by Brazilian Terezinha Guilhermina with her guide Guilherme Soares de Santana.

In the women’s 100 metres T12 final, that Chinese competitor Guohua Zhou and her guide Jie Li finished first was a secondary fact to the home crowd, whose cheers grew louder following the announcement that Great Britain’s Libby Clegg, and guide runner Mikhail Huggins, came in second. The pair did a celebratory lap around the stadium, briefly stopping as a medal was awarded for one of the earlier events. At the end of their victory lap, Clegg hugged her coach whilst Huggins knuckle-bumped athletes standing at the edge of the stadium before Clegg joined him there for hugs from her teammates.

Whilst Katrina Hart and Jenny McLoughlin of Great Britain received the loudest cheers when announced for the women’s 100 metres T37 event, Namibia’s Johanna Benson had the loudest cheer from the crowd; starting without a starting block, she earned a silver, finishing behind France‘s Mandy Francois-Elie by 15 hundredths of a second. There was a delay in announcing the bronze medalist, ultimately Neda Bahi of Tunisia, because of the closeness of the finish which came down to a hundredth of a second separating her from fourth-placed Maria Seifert of Germany. Later in the night, immediately following Oscar Pistorius‘s 200 metres T44 final, Francois-Elie was awarded her gold medal whilst French athletes loudly sang along as their national anthem played.

Pistorius’s race was near the end of the programme, with the announcer hyping it throughout the evening’s competition. When the announcer said Pistorius had entered the field of play, the crowd screamed. As he finally stepped up to be announced, the sound level increased and cameras flashed around the stadium. Pistorius ran his race taking the silver, losing to Brazilian Alan Fonteles Cardoso Oliveira by less than a tenth of a second.

Australians had a successful night, with Carlee Beattie earning a silver in the women’s long jump F46 event, Kurt Fearnley earning a silver in the men’s 5,000 metres T54, Angela Ballard earning a bronze in the women’s 100 metres T53 event and Simon Patmore earning bronze in the men’s 200 metres T46 event. Ballard, competing in her fourth Games, said following her race: “It’s really good especially after how I did at Beijing. So to go home with a medal is great. Hopefully I can do more with that over the rest of the week.”

Hosts Great Britain had a better night, earning a number of medals including David Weir taking gold in the men’s 5,000 metres T54, Graeme Ballard silver in the men’s 100 metres T36, Libby Clegg and her guide runner Mikhail Huggins winning silver in the women’s 100 metres T12.

current leader in medals China added more to their tally, including gold and silver by Lisha Huang and Honghuan Zhou in the women’s 100 metres T53 event, gold in the women’s 100 metres T12 for Guohua Zhou and her guide Jie Li, silver for Yang Liu in the men’s 100 metres T54, a bronze taken by Juntingxian Jia and her guide Donglin Xu in the women’s 200 metres T11 and a bronze in the women’s long jump T46 for Jingling Ouyang.

The United States picked up a few additional medals too, including a gold earned by Raymond Martin, a bronze taken by Paul Nitz in the men’s 100 metres T52 event, bronze for April Holmes in the women’s 100 metres T53 event and bronze for Blake Leeper in the men’s 200 metres T44 event.



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

December 6, 2009

Official results say Namibian president reelected after polls

Filed under: Africa,Archived,Elections,Namibia,Politics and conflicts — admin @ 5:00 am

Official results say Namibian president reelected after polls

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Sunday, December 6, 2009

Namibia
Other stories from Namibia
…More articles here
Location of Namibia

A map showing the location of Namibia

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Namibia, see the Namibia Portal
Flag of Namibia.svg

Final results from Namibian presidential and parliamentary elections have indicated that the incumbent president, Hifikepunye Pohamba, has been reelected by a large margin. The ruling party, South West Africa People’s Organisation (SWAPO), also retained a majority in the parliamentary elections.

File photograph of Hifikepunye Pohamba
Image: Agencia Brasil.

Pohamba won 76.4% of the vote in the presidential ballots; meanwhile, SWAPO obtained 75.27% in the parliamentary polls. The Rally for Democracy and Progress (RDP) party came in a distant second at 11.31%. SWAPO won 54 out of 72 seats in the National Assembly. The RDP took eight seats.

“I am a happy man. I, on behalf of SWAPO accept the election. I am grateful to the Namibian people who once again trusted me,” Pohama commented after his reelection.

Eight of the thirteen parties competing with SWAPO said that they rejected the results of the polls, and would challenge them in court “for contravening the electoral law of the country.” They claimed that they hadn’t been properly informed about the process of vote verification, and that the speed at which the votes were counted was too slow.

A joint statement released by the parties said that “our eight parties will not accept the election results as the elections were conducted in contravention of the law. Accepting this supposed elections outcome will be tantamount to undermining democracy in Namibia.”

African election observers, however, deemed the Namibian elections free and fair.



Sources

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

November 28, 2009

Namibia votes in presidential election

Filed under: Africa,Archived,Elections,Namibia,Politics and conflicts — admin @ 5:00 am

Namibia votes in presidential election – Wikinews, the free news source

Namibia votes in presidential election

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Saturday, November 28, 2009

Namibia
Other stories from Namibia
…More articles here
Location of Namibia

A map showing the location of Namibia

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Namibia, see the Namibia Portal
Flag of Namibia.svg

Voters are heading to the polls today in Namibia to elect a president and parliament The ruling South West Africa People’s Organization is expected to win presidential and parliamentary elections, but a new opposition party is mounting a challenge.

Voters turned out in large numbers before dawn to cast their ballots. Local journalist John Grobler said many waited for hours to vote because of logistical problems. “Voting is slow in just about all the polling stations, but especially so at the polling stations where they don’t have any laptop computers to verify the potential voters on the actual roll, which means they have to go to the physical paper. And that, of course, takes time,” he said.

President Hifikepunye Pohamba is running for a second five-year term. His South West Africa People’s Organization (SWAPO), which has governed Namibia since independence nearly twenty years ago, is expected to win a two-thirds majority in parliament.

However, SWAPO is being challenged by a new party, the Rally for Democracy and Progress. The RDP was formed two years ago after its leader, Hidipo Hamutenya, lost his bid to become SWAPO leader upon the retirement of Namibia’s first president, Sam Nujoma.

Voting will continue for a second day on Saturday and preliminary results are expected sometime next week.



Sources

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

March 17, 2009

Namibia struck by floods, declares state of emergency

Filed under: Africa,Angola,Disasters and accidents,Floods,Namibia — admin @ 5:00 am

Tuesday, March 17, 2009

Other stories from Namibia
  • 15 March 2008: 2007 Rugby World Cup: South Africa, Wales, Scotland and Ireland win
  • 11 March 2008: 2007 Rugby World Cup: South Africa, Australia and New Zealand qualify
  • 11 March 2008: 2007 Rugby World Cup: Fiji, Tonga and France win
  • 28 September 2007: 2007 Rugby World Cup: Georgia claim first World Cup victory
  • 17 March 2007: Namibia: VAT on milk to stay
…More articles here
Location of Namibia

A map showing the location of Namibia

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Namibia, see the Namibia Portal

Namibian President Hifikepunye Pohamba
Image: Agência Brasil.

Hifikepunye Pohamba, the president of the southern African country of Namibia, declare a state of emergency in in the country on Tuesday after heavy flooding killed 92 and displaced 5,032 since January.

“It is with a heavy heart that I declare an emergency for the north-central and north-eastern parts of Namibia,” the president said to reporters. “Crop fields are submerged in water and I send out an urgent appeal to the international community for assistance […] as the current flood is worse than a year ago and could be one of the worst in recent memory.”

100,000 children were unable to attend classes due to the disaster, which closed 218 schools.

Severe flooding occurred in Namibia about the same time last year, when 42 people were killed by the disaster.

This year’s floods appear to be worse, as President Pohamba stated that the Zambezi River had reached 7.1 metres, compared to last year’s peak of 5.37 metres.

Flooding has also reached neighbouring Angola, where nineteen people have died, according to the Red Cross.


Sources

Namibia on Wikipedia.

  • “Namibia declares emergency in areas hit by floods”. Reuters AlertNet, March 17, 2009
  • “Namibia declares flood emergency, seeks aid”. iol.co.za, March 17, 2009
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Namibia struck by floods, president declares state of emergency

Filed under: Africa,Angola,Archived,Disasters and accidents,Floods,Namibia — admin @ 5:00 am

Namibia struck by floods, president declares state of emergency

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Tuesday, March 17, 2009

Namibia
Other stories from Namibia
…More articles here
Location of Namibia

A map showing the location of Namibia

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Namibia, see the Namibia Portal
Flag of Namibia.svg

Namibian President Hifikepunye Pohamba
Image: Agência Brasil.

Hifikepunye Pohamba, the president of the southern African country of Namibia, declared a state of emergency in in the country on Tuesday after heavy flooding killed 92 and displaced 5,032 since January.

“It is with a heavy heart that I declare an emergency for the north-central and north-eastern parts of Namibia,” the president said to reporters. “Crop fields are submerged in water and I send out an urgent appeal to the international community for assistance […] as the current flood is worse than a year ago and could be one of the worst in recent memory.”

100,000 children were unable to attend classes due to the disaster, which closed 218 schools.

Severe flooding occurred in Namibia about the same time last year, when 42 people were killed by the disaster.

This year’s floods appear to be worse, as President Pohamba stated that the Zambezi River had reached 7.1 metres, compared to last year’s peak of 5.37 metres.

Flooding has also reached neighbouring Angola, where nineteen people have died, according to the Red Cross.



Sources

Wikipedia-logo.png Namibia on Wikipedia.

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

March 17, 2007

Namibia: VAT on milk to stay

Namibia: VAT on milk to stay – Wikinews, the free news source

Namibia: VAT on milk to stay

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Saturday, March 17, 2007

The Namibian government has refused to remove value added tax (VAT) on the price of milk. The Namibian Dairy producers organization requested the Namibian directorate of local income in May 2006 to follow the example of South Africa and declare fresh milk as a basic need upon which no taxation is applicable.

Mnr. Calle Schlettwein, permanent Secretary of the Namibia Ministry of Finance said the decision not to discard VAT on milk is because of two reasons: “This industry is already receiving advantages because of Article 26 of the African Customs Union (SACU),” he said.

“Secondly, the ministry cannot decrease the country’s tax basis. Namibia is a country that spend more than what it can collect through tax. We cannot afford to discard VAT on fresh milk.”

The price of fresh milk is to climb by 50c in the beginning of April 2007 following increases in production costs to producers. The dairy industry has warned of a collapse of the industry and a dependence on foreign imports if prices are not increased to match rising production costs.

Sources

External links

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March 10, 2005

United Nations passes Declaration on human cloning

United Nations passes Declaration on human cloning

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Thursday, March 10, 2005

The declaration was passed at the UN general assembly

A divided UN General Assembly has voted to approve a nonbinding statement against all forms of human cloning.

The vote, held Tuesday, came after four years of debate and an end to attempts for an international ban.

In the 191-nation assembly, there were 84 votes in favor of a nonbinding statement, 34 against and 37 abstentions.

Proposed by Honduras, the statement was largely supported by Roman Catholic countries and opposed by countries with active embryonic stem cell research programs. Many Islamic nations abstained.

The UN Declaration on Human Cloning, as it is named, calls for all member states to adopt a ban on human cloning, which it says is “incompatible with human dignity and the protection of human life.”

The US, which has long pushed for a complete ban, voted in favor of the statement while traditional ally Britain, where therapeutic cloning is legal and regulated, voted against it.

The statement should have no impact on countries that allow therapeutic cloning, such as Britain and South Korea, as it is not legally binding.

“The foes of therapeutic cloning are trying to portray this as a victory for their ideology,” Bernard Siegel, a Florida attorney who lobbies to defend therapeutic cloning, said in a Reuters report. “But this confusing declaration is an effort to mask their failure last November to impose a treaty on the world banning therapeutic cloning.”

Breakdown of the vote

Of the 191 countries eligible to vote:

In favor

84 countries voted in favor of the declaration against cloning:

Afghanistan, Albania, Andorra, Australia, Austria, Bahrain, Bangladesh, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Brunei Darussalam, Burundi, Chile, Comoros, Costa Rica, Côte d’Ivoire, Croatia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Djibouti, Dominican Republic, Ecuador, El Salvador, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Georgia, Germany, Grenada, Guatemala, Guyana, Haiti, Honduras, Hungary, Iraq, Ireland, Italy, Kazakhstan, Kenya, Kuwait, Lesotho, Liberia, Liechtenstein, Madagascar, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mexico, Federated States of Micronesia, Monaco, Morocco, Nicaragua, Palau, Panama, Paraguay, Philippines, Poland, Portugal, Qatar, Rwanda, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Sao Tome and Principe, Saudi Arabia, Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Slovenia, Solomon Islands, Sudan, Suriname, Switzerland, Tajikistan, The former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Uganda, United Arab Emirates, United Republic of Tanzania, United States, Uzbekistan, Zambia.

Against

34 countries voted against the declaration:

Belarus, Belgium, Brazil, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Canada, China, Cuba, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Democratic People`s Republic of Korea, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Gabon, Iceland, India, Jamaica, Japan, Lao People’s Democratic Republic, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Republic of Korea, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, Thailand, Tonga, United Kingdom.

Abstention

37 countries abstained from voting on the declaration against cloning:

Algeria, Angola, Argentina, Azerbaijan, Bahamas, Barbados, Burkina Faso, Cameroon, Cape Verde, Colombia, Egypt, Indonesia, Iran, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Malaysia, Maldives, Mongolia, Myanmar, Namibia, Nepal, Oman, Pakistan, Republic of Moldova, Romania, Serbia and Montenegro, Somalia, South Africa, Sri Lanka, Syria, Tunisia, Turkey, Ukraine, Uruguay, Yemen, Zimbabwe.

Absent

36 countries were absent from and during the vote on the declaration against cloning:

Antigua and Barbuda, Armenia, Bhutan, Botswana, Central African Republic, Chad, Congo, Dominica, Fiji, Gambia, Ghana, Greece, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Kiribati, Kyrgyzstan, Libya, Malawi, Mali, Mauritania, Mozambique, Nauru, Niger, Nigeria, Papua New Guinea, Peru, Russian Federation, Senegal, Seychelles, Swaziland, Togo, Turkmenistan, Tuvalu, Vanuatu, Venezuela, Vietnam.

Sources


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