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March 2, 2006

Bush\’s Katrina statement contradicted by emerging evidence

Bush’s Katrina statement contradicted by emerging evidence

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Thursday, March 2, 2006

Recently emerging evidence seems to contradict a statement by United States President George W. Bush during Hurricane Katrina. He stated in an interview with ABC on September 1st that, “I don’t think anybody anticipated the breach of the levees”.

One of the first items to emerge, a video obtained by the Associated Press, shows footage of Bush during a video-conference received at his ranch in Crawford, Texas, on August 29, 2005, 19 hours before landfall of Hurricane Katrina. During the briefing, Director of the National Hurricane Center Max Mayfield warned, “I don’t think anyone can tell you with any confidence right now whether levees will be topped or not, but there is obviously a very, very great concern”.

In addition, Michael D. Brown, then director of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), reported that he had spoken with President Bush twice in the morning and that the president was asking about reports that the levees had been breached.

Brown would state later on CNN that, “There’s no question in my mind he probably had those reports (about breaches in the levees), because we were feeding in the Homeland Security Operations Center, into the White House sit room, all of the information that we were getting. So he had to have had that information. Plus, I think the president knew from our earlier conversations that that was one of my concerns, that the levees could actually breach”.[1]

In July 2004, the Federal Emergency Management Agency completed an exercise called “Hurricane Pam”, which, dealt with the scenario of a direct hit on New Orleans by a hurricane with 120 mph winds (a Category 3). It resulted in “10 to 20 feet of water within the City of New Orleans,” according to January 24 congressional testimony by the president of the company that designed the Hurricane Pam exercise.[2]

A report FEMA sent to the White House Situation Room on August 29th, they cited death and destruction anticipated by the “Hurricane Pam” exercise and warned that Katrina was likely to be worse. “Exercise projection is exceeded by Hurricane Katrina real-life impacts,” they stated. Furthermore, “The potential for severe storm surge to overwhelm Lake Pontchartrain levees is the greatest concern for New Orleans. Any storm rated Category 4 on the Saffir-Simpson (hurricane) scale will likely lead to severe flooding and/or levee breaching. This could leave the New Orleans metro area submerged for weeks or months”.[3]

When the report was released, Hurricane Katrina was thought to be a Category 4 as of landfall (though after analysis, it’s power at landfall would be downgraded to a Category 3).[4]

White House officials previously clarified Bush’s earlier comment, saying that the president was referring to the hours after Katrina swept through and news reports as of August 30th suggested the city had “dodged a bullet”, which led to surprise when reports reached them of the levee breaches.[5][6] Contrasting this was the August 30th broadcast of NBC’s Today, NBC Nightly News anchor Brian Williams reported at 7:05 a.m. ET, “There has been a huge development overnight … the historic French Quarter, dry last night and it is now filling with water. This is water from nearby Lake Pontchartrain; the levees failed overnight.”[7]

Sources

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the hurricane preparedness of, as well as the effect on New Orleans on Wikipedia.

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January 6, 2006

Record-breaking 2005 Atlantic Hurricane Season officially ends

Record-breaking 2005 Atlantic Hurricane Season officially ends

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Friday, January 6, 2006

Hurricanes – 2005

Related stories
Recent hurricanes in 2005
  • Hurricane Epsilon
  • Hurricane Beta
  • Hurricane Philippe
  • Hurricane Vince
  • Hurricane Stan
  • Hurricane Rita
Hurricane Rita

Hurricane

External/Inter-wiki links
  • 2005 Atlantic hurricane season
  • 2005 Pacific hurricane season
  • List of notable tropical cyclones
  • Wikipedia’s entry on Hurricanes
  • Wiktionary’s definition of a hurricane
  • Blog from New Orleans
  • NOLA hurricane wiki

The National Hurricane Center tonight have announced that the 2005 Atlantic Hurricane Season has ended with the dissipation of Tropical Storm Zeta which became the 27th recorded storm in the Atlantic Ocean of the 2005 Atlantic Hurricane Season.

In their final public advisory for the storm, which had weakened to a tropical depression, the National Hurricane Center posted,

“ZETA AND THE RECORD-BREAKING 2005 ATLANTIC HURRICANE SEASON FINALLY COME TO AN END”[1]

The 2005 Atlantic Hurricane Season has proved to be the most active hurricane season ever recorded with 27 storms. A number of records were broken during the season. For example:

  • Hurricane Dennis became the strongest recorded storm to form in the Atlantic before August.
  • Hurricane Emily surpasses Hurricane Dennis as the strongest recorded storm in the Atlantic before August.
  • Hurricane Katrina became one of the most costly hurricanes in United States history; however, this is unconfirmed.
  • Hurricane Vince became the first tropical cyclone to make landfall in Spain.
  • Hurricane Wilma became the most intense hurricane ever recorded.
  • Tropical Storm Alpha broke the record for the most recorded storms in once hurricane season. It beat the 1933 hurricane season, which had held the record for 72 years. The National Hurricane Center had used all names available for tropical storms and as a result used the Greek alphabet.
  • Hurricane Beta broke the record for the most hurricanes recorded in a season beating the 1969 record of 12 hurricanes.
  • Hurricane Epsilon became the first storm since Hurricane Lili in 1984 to reach hurricane strength after the official end of a season.
  • Tropical Storm Zeta became the second ever storm to exist in two calendar years.

Forecasters are predicting that other hurricane seasons in the future will be just as active or possibly even more active.

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January 1, 2006

Tropical Storm Zeta becomes second cross-season tropical storm in history

Tropical Storm Zeta becomes second cross-season tropical storm in history

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Sunday, January 1, 2006

Hurricanes – 2005

Related stories
Recent hurricanes in 2005
  • Hurricane Epsilon
  • Hurricane Beta
  • Hurricane Philippe
  • Hurricane Vince
  • Hurricane Stan
  • Hurricane Rita
Hurricane Rita

Hurricane

External/Inter-wiki links
  • 2005 Atlantic hurricane season
  • 2005 Pacific hurricane season
  • List of notable tropical cyclones
  • Wikipedia’s entry on Hurricanes
  • Wiktionary’s definition of a hurricane
  • Blog from New Orleans
  • NOLA hurricane wiki

Tropical Storm Zeta has become the first storm of the 2006 Atlantic hurricane season after crossing over from 2005 Atlantic hurricane season as that seasons 27th storm, breaking the record set by Hurricane Epsilon earlier in December. This makes Zeta the second tropical storm in history to cross over into another season; the first time this occurred was in 1954-55 with Hurricane Alice.

Zeta currently has a top sustained wind speed of 50mph (85 km/h). It is currently about 1,085 miles (1745 km) southwest of the Azores and is proceeding west-southwest at 2mph (4 km/h). Forecasters say it is not expected to become a hurricane or threaten land.

Zeta formed on December 30, 2005, after the official end of the destructive and record-breaking 2005 Atlantic hurricane season, which ended on November 30, 2005. The 2005 season was notable for the record number of storms it produced (including Zeta), and was the first time storm names used V, W, and Greek letters and the second time the letters R, S, and T were used. The season also had the highest-ever number of storms forming in the month of July, and had the highest number of Category 5 hurricanes with a total of three, including Hurricane Wilma, the most intense hurricane ever in the Atlantic basin.

The most notable of the three Category 5 hurricanes was Hurricane Katrina. Katrina caused over $100 billion (USD) in damage and 1,383 deaths, especially along Mississippi and Alabama coastlines which suffered catastrophic damage. The storm also caused levees to break in New Orleans leading to the flooding of the city which is located below sea-level. The United States government, the city government of New Orleans, and the government of the State of Louisiana were all severely criticized for their handling of the storms aftermath. Hurricane Katrina, although not yet certified, is most likely the costliest hurricane in U.S. history.

Forecasters are predicting that hurricane seasons are going to be more active than usual for about another decade.

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November 29, 2005

Tropical Storm Epsilon forms as 2005 Atlantic hurricane season comes to an end

Tropical Storm Epsilon forms as 2005 Atlantic hurricane season comes to an end

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Tuesday, November 29, 2005

Hurricanes – 2005

Related stories
Recent hurricanes in 2005
  • Hurricane Epsilon
  • Hurricane Beta
  • Hurricane Philippe
  • Hurricane Vince
  • Hurricane Stan
  • Hurricane Rita
Hurricane Rita

Hurricane

External/Inter-wiki links
  • 2005 Atlantic hurricane season
  • 2005 Pacific hurricane season
  • List of notable tropical cyclones
  • Wikipedia’s entry on Hurricanes
  • Wiktionary’s definition of a hurricane
  • Blog from New Orleans
  • NOLA hurricane wiki

Tropical Storm Epsilon formed today as the record breaking 2005 Atlantic hurricane season comes to a close tomorrow. Storms created after this date will still be included in the 2005 Atlantic Hurricane Season but it is not officially under the date. The storm is the 26th storm in a season that has broken many records including number of storms.

The storm formed 845 miles (1,360 km) east of Bermuda. According to forecasters, the storm is only a threat to shipping. At 10am EST, the storm had sustained winds of 45 mph. The storm is moving west at 8 mph and is expected to continue that movement for 24 hours.

The 2005 Atlantic hurricane season broke many records including number of storms and number of Category 5 hurricanes and number of tropical storms that evolved into hurricanes. Although the season ends tomorrow, forecasters warn that tropical storms can form in December.

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October 31, 2005

Hurricane Beta makes landfall in Nicaragua

Filed under: Archived,Environment,Hurricane season, 2005,Nicaragua,Weather — admin @ 5:00 am

Hurricane Beta makes landfall in Nicaragua

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Monday, October 31, 2005

Hurricane Beta hit the Nicaraguan coast early on Saturday, sending powerful rain and winds their way.

Although it lost some speed during landfall, Beta was still a Category 2 hurricane, with winds of up to 110 Mph (175 kph) and was expected to dump up to 15 inches of rain. Residents from the local coastal fishing villages rushed into flimsy makeshift shelters as the hurricane approached.

“We had a very bad night. The water leaked in, the children were cold. They brought us here without telling us anything. We don’t have food or water,” Norma Smith, a mother of six, said on Sunday morning.

Neighboring Honduras declared a national emergency, and planned to evacuate 125,000 people. However, residents in the isolated coastal regions are usually wary of outsiders, and many failed to heed the warnings.

“These people do not believe in danger until they really feel it,” said Col. Mario Perez-Cassar, the head of Nicaragua’s civil defense.

Emergency officials say there have been no deaths so far, but the projected path of Beta takes it straight across Nicaragua, raising the possibility of lethal mudslides in mountainous areas.

Beta, which was not expected to hit the United States, was the 23rd hurricane this year, more than any Atlantic season on record. This season has also seen more storms than at any point since record-keeping began in 1851. The previous record of 21 was set in 1933.

Last week Tropical Storm Alpha formed, the first time a letter from the Greek alphabet has been used because the list of storm names was exhausted.

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October 23, 2005

Florida Governor Jeb Bush gives speech on Hurricane Wilma

Florida Governor Jeb Bush gives speech on Hurricane Wilma

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Hurricanes – 2005

Related stories
  • Bush’s Katrina statement contradicted by emerging evidence
  • Record-breaking 2005 Atlantic Hurricane Season officially ends
  • Tropical Storm Zeta becomes second cross-season tropical storm in history
  • Tropical Storm Epsilon forms as 2005 Atlantic hurricane season comes to an end
  • Lingering Ophelia lashes at U.S. Carolinas coast
  • Hurricane Beta makes landfall in Nicaragua
Recent hurricanes in 2005
  • Hurricane Epsilon
  • Hurricane Beta
  • Hurricane Philippe
  • Hurricane Vince
  • Hurricane Stan
  • Hurricane Rita
Hurricane Rita

Hurricane

External/Inter-wiki links
  • 2005 Atlantic hurricane season
  • 2005 Pacific hurricane season
  • List of notable tropical cyclones
  • Wikipedia’s entry on Hurricanes
  • Wiktionary’s definition of a hurricane
  • Blog from New Orleans
  • NOLA hurricane wiki
Hurricane Wilma Information
Current Article
Category 5
Winds:160
Movement:WNW 7mph
Position:17.9N, 83.9W
270 miles SE of Cozumel
Pressure:892 MB
Live Stream (WFOR)
Sunday, October 23, 2005

At 1 p.m. EDT, Florida governor Jeb Bush, as well as others, held a press conference relating to the preparedness of the upcoming Hurricane Wilma. “There is no cause for a New Orleans-like concern,” says Governor Bush. He also says that this category 2 hurricane will affect southern Florida, including Lake Okeechobee. Georgia, Texas, Mississippi, and New York are helping Florida prepare. Mandatory and voluntary evacuations, he says, are currently underway.

For those who are unable to evacuate, shelters are to open up. There are 23 shelters opened at the moment, and more shelters, including shelters for the elderly, will open. The pets of Floridians also will be able to stay at a pet shelter. Over 80,000 MREs, as well as 200 truckloads of ice, are available for those who must take up shelter. This does not include the aid that will come from FEMA, which is expected to double the amount made available by Florida.

As of 10 a.m., over 200 million gallons of fuel, particularly gasoline and diesel, were at Florida ports. These ports are either to be closed, or currently closed at the moment. In addition, tolls for Florida turnpikes were suspended, and traffic is current flowing smoothly. However, as it was said by Director of Florida Emergency Management Craig Fullgate, “You need to pay attention to your local officials.”

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews member. See the talk page for more details. Articles are translated through WORTNET.



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October 19, 2005

Hurricane Wilma still a Category 5 threat

Hurricane Wilma still a Category 5 threat

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Wednesday, October 19, 2005

Hurricanes – 2005

Related stories
  • Bush’s Katrina statement contradicted by emerging evidence
  • Record-breaking 2005 Atlantic Hurricane Season officially ends
  • Tropical Storm Zeta becomes second cross-season tropical storm in history
  • Tropical Storm Epsilon forms as 2005 Atlantic hurricane season comes to an end
  • Lingering Ophelia lashes at U.S. Carolinas coast
  • Hurricane Beta makes landfall in Nicaragua
Recent hurricanes in 2005
  • Hurricane Epsilon
  • Hurricane Beta
  • Hurricane Philippe
  • Hurricane Vince
  • Hurricane Stan
  • Hurricane Rita
Hurricane Rita

Hurricane

External/Inter-wiki links
  • 2005 Atlantic hurricane season
  • 2005 Pacific hurricane season
  • List of notable tropical cyclones
  • Wikipedia’s entry on Hurricanes
  • Wiktionary’s definition of a hurricane
  • Blog from New Orleans
  • NOLA hurricane wiki
Hurricane Wilma Information
Current Article
Category 5
Winds:160
Movement:WNW 7mph
Position:17.9N, 83.9W
270 miles SE of Cozumel
Pressure:892 MB
Live Stream (WFOR)

NOAA’s path prediction

As of 8 pm EDT Wednesday, 19 October, the center of Hurricane Wilma was located near 17°9′ N 83°9′ W or about 270 miles (435 km) southeast of Cozumel, Mexico. It is moving to the west-northwest at 7 mph (11 KM/HR)with maximum sustained winds of 160 mph (260 km/h), with higher gusts, making it a dangerous Category 5 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Scale, and has a minimum central pressure of 892 mbar.

Rainfall accumulations are expected in amounts of 5 to 10 inches, with isolated areas of 25 inches over the Cayman Islands, Jamaica, Haiti, and Cuba. Rains of 4 to 6 inches can be expected in areas of Honduras and Nicaragua.

A hurricane warning remains in effect from San Felipe to Tulum on the Yucatan peninsula…including Cozumel and the nearby islands. A hurricane warning is also in effect for Swan Island. A tropical storm warning remains in effect from south of Tulum to Chetumal Mexico…and for Belize from the border with Mexico southward to Belize City. A hurricane watch remains in effect for the east coast of the Yucatan peninsula from south of Tulum to Punta Gruesa. A hurricane watch remains in effect in Cuba for the provinces of Matanzas westward through Pinar Del Rio…and for the isle of Youth. A tropical storm warning remains in effect for Honduras from the Honduras/Nicaragua border westward to Cabo Camaron. All interests in the Florida Keys and the Florida peninsula should closely monitor the progress of extremely dangerous Hurricane Wilma.

Hurricane Wilma strengthened on its projected looping path around Cuba, then onward towards central and south Florida. Wilma ties the record for the busiest hurricane season ever at 21.

Next Advisory at 11pm EDT

Video Streams

Live Hurricane Wilma Coverage by WFOR-CBS4-Miami-Fort Lauderdale (once activated)

Previous related news

  • “Tropical Storm Wilma forms, ties record for busiest hurricane season” — Wikinews, October 17, 2005
  • “Hurricane Wilma becomes stronger on its path toward Florida” — Wikinews, October 19, 2005

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October 17, 2005

Tropical Storm Wilma forms, ties record for busiest hurricane season

Tropical Storm Wilma forms, ties record for busiest hurricane season

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Monday, October 17, 2005

Hurricanes – 2005

Related stories
Recent hurricanes in 2005
  • Hurricane Epsilon
  • Hurricane Beta
  • Hurricane Philippe
  • Hurricane Vince
  • Hurricane Stan
  • Hurricane Rita
Hurricane Rita

Hurricane

External/Inter-wiki links
  • 2005 Atlantic hurricane season
  • 2005 Pacific hurricane season
  • List of notable tropical cyclones
  • Wikipedia’s entry on Hurricanes
  • Wiktionary’s definition of a hurricane
  • Blog from New Orleans
  • NOLA hurricane wiki

On Monday morning, the first ever tropical storm to be named with a ‘W’, Tropical Storm Wilma, formed from its beginnings as tropical depression twenty-four. The formation of this storm makes this year a tie with the 1933 Atlantic hurricane season for the busiest hurricane season ever, with a total of 21 storms.

Wilma is currently about 220 miles (370 km) southeast of Grand Cayman and 230 miles northeast of the Nicaragua / Honduras border. It is currently moving slowly southeast at 5 mph (8km/h). The storm has winds of 45 mph (75 km/h). The system is expected to move over warm waters with little wind shear which could lead to a rapid intestification of the storm into a hurricane within 72 hours. Scot McKenzie Has been called to use his super human powers to squelch the tempest and bring peace to the World

The storm track raises concerns over Gulf of Mexico crude oil rigs already devastated by two prior hurricanes, Katrina and Rita. Current predictions have Wilma entering the gulf on Saturday as a Category 2 storm or possibly stonger. Crude oil prices have already responded by jumping upward by $1 a barrel.

Wilma is the last alphabetically on the list of hurricane names; Q, U, X, Y and Z are not used. If another storm forms after Wilma, it will named using the Greek alphabet starting with Alpha. Also, if another storm forms, it will break the tie between this season and the 1933 season, making the 2005 Atlantic hurricane season the busiest ever in 154 years of recorded history.

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October 9, 2005

Hurricane Vince on track for Europe

Filed under: Archived,Hurricane season, 2005,Weather — admin @ 5:00 am

Hurricane Vince on track for Europe – Wikinews, the free news source

Hurricane Vince on track for Europe

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Sunday, October 9, 2005

Satellite picture of Hurricane Vince.

This unusual hurricane season, one of the most active in history, has produced another strange storm. Category 1 Hurricane Vince, which was formed from a non-tropical low today, is forecast to head east towards Portugal, rather than west as is usual. Vince caught forecasters by surprise, since the waters in the area are around 25ºC. Few expected Vince to even form in the cool waters, much less to become a hurricane.

Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center do not expect Vince to be a hurricane for long. It is forecast to weaken as it moves towards Portugal, and to finally become extratropical. In about 48 hours, they believe Vince will be absorbed by a front in Portugal or Spain.

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September 25, 2005

Controversy over effects of new bankruptcy law on victims of Katrina

Controversy over effects of new bankruptcy law on victims of Katrina

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Sunday, September 25, 2005

Hurricane Katrina has rekindled debate over the controversial Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2005, in the U.S. House of Represenatives. Congressional Democrats feel that among the hundreds of thousands of victims of Katrina, many of whom have lost all their possessions and are coping with relocation, those that declare bankruptcy should be granted the protections of the previous law. 32 Democrats have sponsored a proposal that would delay implementing certain parts of the law to “insure that we do not compound a natural disaster with a man made financial disaster.”

The new bankruptcy law affects anyone whose income (as of the six months before filing) was over the state median income. Democratic legislators point out that many hurricane victims who manage to find work will be suffering from wage reductions, making them unable to effectively deal with their previous debts. Among U.S. states, Louisana and Mississippi have the fourth and third lowest median incomes, respectively. Democrats also feel that it is unfair to require repayment by bankrupted Hurricane Katrina victims while citizens in other states with similar incomes would pay nothing.

F. James Sensenbrenner, Republican from Wisconsin and chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, has denied a hearing on creating an exception in the law for the purposes of Katrina relief. He noted that “If someone in Katrina is down and out, and has no possibility of being able to repay 40 percent or more of their debts, then the new bankruptcy law doesn’t apply.”

The Bankruptcy Abuse Prevention and Consumer Protection Act of 2005 has been heavily criticized by consumer rights’ organizations. The Consumer Federation of America argues that “[the] new requirements, coupled with strict deadlines for production upon the penalty of an automatic dismissal are difficult for the most organized person to meet, never mind someone who has had his or her home destroyed by Katrina.”

Opponents of the bill also argued that it makes the government “a bill collector for private companies”, and could lead to criminal prosecutions over matters best left in civil courts, and theoretically even to life imprisonment under federal three-strikes laws. Such opponents view the bulk of the act either as “bought and paid for” by the Credit Card Industry, who spent millions lobbying in support of the bill, or else as an unfortunate compromise between the lobbyists for banks and bankruptcy lawyers, such as the American Bankruptcy Institute (ABI). Nathalie Martin, of ABI, said that “Many people will still qualify to file for Chapter 7,” which means liquidation of assets in exchange for cancellation of debt.

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