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December 22, 2008

US drone strike kills eight in Pakistan\’s tribal region

US drone strike kills eight in Pakistan’s tribal region

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Monday, December 22, 2008

Pakistan Afghan Border. Location of the FATA and South Waziristan where the air strike took place.

A suspected United States military air strike launched by a remote-controlled and unmanned CIA aircraft on Monday morning killed at least 8 militants. Media reports claim that in two separate attacks, three missiles were fired by US drones at South Waziristan’s Karikot and Shin Warsak villages, a tribal area in northwest Pakistan, well-known as center of Taliban and Al-Qaeda activity. The site of the attack is about nine miles (15 km) from the town of Wana in South Waziristan, an ungoverned tribal region.

South Waziristan is the southern part of Waziristan, a mountainous region of northwest Pakistan, bordering Afghanistan and covering some 11,585 km² (4,473 mi²). It comprises the area west and southwest of Peshawar between the Tochi River to the North and the Gomal river to the south, forming part of Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA). The North-West Frontier Province lies immediately to the east. The region was an independent tribal territory from 1893, remaining outside of British-ruled empire and Afghanistan. Tribal raiding into British-ruled territory was a constant problem for the British, requiring frequent punitive expeditions between 1860 and 1945. The region became part of Pakistan in 1947.

A senior security official said that “two vehicles fitted with guns were destroyed,” adding that “the eight people killed were all inside the vehicles.” Pakistani intelligence said they believed the extremists killed were members of local Pakistani Taliban groups. The reports also said that the missiles “targeted vehicles mounted with anti-aircraft guns, and one missile missed its intended target and landed near a house.” A local official said nine other extremists were wounded in the drone strike.

RQ-1 Predator Drone similar to the one alleged in the air strike.

Agence France-Presse has reported that “a missile attack late last month by a US jet killed Rashid Rauf, the alleged Al-Qaeda mastermind of a 2006 transatlantic airplane bombing plot, as well as an Egyptian Al-Qaeda operative, security officials have said.” US unmanned drones have launched not less than 20 missile attacks in Pakistan Afghan border or tribal areas since August. The strikes have raised tensions between Washington and Islamabad.

In November, Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani viewed these missile strikes as flagrant violation of Pakistan’s sovereignty and territorial integrity. He announced his government was considering “a number of options to counter attacks”. BBC has reported, however, that Pakistan “has been reluctant to move either diplomatically or militarily to stop these strikes.” “This has fuelled speculation that the attacks may be part of a secret pact between Pakistan and the US,” it added. Meanwhile, President George W. Bush, last week, said that “you know very well that when it comes to certain matters, the U.S. government doesn’t discuss operations.” He ruled out consultations with other governments, including Pakistan, prior to drone strikes operations.



Related news

  • “18 killed in U.S. air strike on village in Pakistan” — Wikinews, January 14, 2006
  • “Pakistani Official claims ‘foreign terrorists’ among civilians killed in U.S. airstrike” — Wikinews, January 17, 2006

Sources


Top-left-corner.png Islamic Republic of Pakistan – اسلامی جمہوریہ پاکستان Top-right-corner.png
Location of Pakistan

A map showing the location of Pakistan

Other Pakistani stories
…More articles here
 

 

 

 

To write, edit, start or view other Pakistan articles, see the Pakistan Portal  


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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

UK legislation expands debt collectors\’ powers

Filed under: Archived,Crime and law,Europe,United Kingdom — admin @ 5:00 am

UK legislation expands debt collectors’ powers

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, December 22, 2008

Crime and law
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Crime and law
Collaborate!
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The United Kingdom Parliament is planning to expand the powers of bailiffs in pursuit of unpaid debts. While the new measures are not yet officially active, bailiffs are expected to soon be able to use force in entering debtors’ homes and restraining them.

The preemptive crackdown was introduced with predictions of hundreds of thousands of British citizens losing their homes to credit companies as the international financial crisis grows worse.

Previous to the proposed laws, bailiffs were not allowed to break into or enter homes unless the debtor was already there, or as a last resort. Force was also prohibited unless in self defense.

Justice Lord Bach stated the Act would not be made active until after Parliament had finished extensive consulting, and that the new powers of bailiffs would be carefully monitored.

Civil rights activists like Paul Nicolson of the Zacchaeus 2000 Trust, however, have heavily criticized the new laws, accusing them of destroying fundamental civil rights and stripping away “tried and tested protections that make a person’s home his castle and which have stood for centuries”.

A government spokesman said the Parliament was considering its options for implementing the new laws and would make an announcement soon.



Sources

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Russian flight returns to Athens after bomb threat

Russian flight returns to Athens after bomb threat

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, December 22, 2008

A file photo of an Aeroflot A319

Aeroflot Flight 296 has returned to Greece after a bomb threat was received during a flight from Athens to Moscow, Russia.

Greek authorities told the Airbus A319’s flight crew to return the jet to Athens International Airport after the airport was told by an anonymous telephone caller that a bomb was on the flight. The airliner reached an area close to the Turkish border when word was received and the aircraft turned around.

At 12:18 GMT, the aircraft performed a safe landing at Athens, and all 49 passengers were evacuated safely. Local authorities then searched the aircraft, but no bomb was found.



Sources

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Continental 737 runs off runway at Denver International Airport

Filed under: North America,United States — admin @ 5:00 am

Continental 737 runs off runway at Denver International Airport

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
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Monday, December 22, 2008

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A Continental 737

A Boeing 737 passenger jet owned and operated by Continental Airlines taking off from Denver, Colorado, in the United States ran off the south end of runway 16L/34R and into a ravine at 6:20 PM local time on Saturday. The Houston-bound airplane burst into flames, and the 112 people on board were forced to evacuate the aircraft by the use of slides. Ground crews promptly arrived at the scene, and the fire was swiftly extinguished.

Thirty-eight people sustained injuries, such as broken bones, after the accident. Two of the injured were reported to be in critical condition.

Patrick Hynes, the Denver Fire Department Division Chief, stated that the fire associated with the crash burnt the entire right side of the plane, causing melted plastic from the overhead compartments to drip onto seats below them.

Mike Wilson, a passenger on board the airplane, described the accident and the chaos that followed: “By the time the plane stopped we were burning pretty well and I think I could feel the heat even through the bulkhead and window. I made for the exit door as quickly as I could, fearing the right wing might explode from the fire. Once out, I scrambled down the wing.”

The cause of the accident has not been confirmed, but preliminary reports indicate that a braking malfunction may be to blame. The weather in Denver at the time of the crash was cold, but not snowy. Kim Day, the Denver International Airport manager of aviation, reported that the airplane went off course about 2 000 feet off the end of the runway, and did not seem to be airborne.

The accident forced the west airfield of the airport to shut down, and resulted in delays of 40 minutes. The runway re-opened Monday, December 22 by 6:00 P.M.



Sources

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

US drone strike kills eight in Pakistan’s tribal region

Other stories from Pakistan
…More articles here
Location of Pakistan

A map showing the location of Pakistan

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Pakistan, see the Pakistan Portal
Portal:Pakistan

Monday, December 22, 2008

Pakistan Afghan Border. Location of the FATA and South Waziristan where the air strike took place.

A suspected United States military air strike launched by a remote-controlled and unmanned CIA aircraft on Monday morning killed at least 8 militants. Media reports claim that in two separate attacks, three missiles were fired by US drones at South Waziristan‘s Karikot and Shin Warsak villages, a tribal area in northwest Pakistan, well-known as center of Taliban and Al-Qaeda activity. The site of the attack is about nine miles (15 km) from the town of Wana in South Waziristan, an ungoverned tribal region.

South Waziristan is the southern part of Waziristan, a mountainous region of northwest Pakistan, bordering Afghanistan and covering some 11,585 km² (4,473 mi²). It comprises the area west and southwest of Peshawar between the Tochi River to the North and the Gomal river to the south, forming part of Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA). The North-West Frontier Province lies immediately to the east. The region was an independent tribal territory from 1893, remaining outside of British-ruled empire and Afghanistan. Tribal raiding into British-ruled territory was a constant problem for the British, requiring frequent punitive expeditions between 1860 and 1945. The region became part of Pakistan in 1947.

A senior security official said that “two vehicles fitted with guns were destroyed,” adding that “the eight people killed were all inside the vehicles.” Pakistani intelligence said they believed the extremists killed were members of local Pakistani Taliban groups. The reports also said that the missiles “targeted vehicles mounted with anti-aircraft guns, and one missile missed its intended target and landed near a house.” A local official said nine other extremists were wounded in the drone strike.

RQ-1 Predator Drone similar to the one alleged in the air strike.

Agence France-Presse has reported that “a missile attack late last month by a US jet killed Rashid Rauf, the alleged Al-Qaeda mastermind of a 2006 transatlantic airplane bombing plot, as well as an Egyptian Al-Qaeda operative, security officials have said.” US unmanned drones have launched not less than 20 missile attacks in Pakistan Afghan border or tribal areas since August. The strikes have raised tensions between Washington and Islamabad.

In November, Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani viewed these missile strikes as flagrant violation of Pakistan’s sovereignty and territorial integrity. He announced his government was considering “a number of options to counter attacks”. BBC has reported, however, that Pakistan “has been reluctant to move either diplomatically or militarily to stop these strikes.” “This has fuelled speculation that the attacks may be part of a secret pact between Pakistan and the US,” it added. Meanwhile, President George W. Bush, last week, said that “you know very well that when it comes to certain matters, the U.S. government doesn’t discuss operations.” He ruled out consultations with other governments, including Pakistan, prior to drone strikes operations.


Related news

  • “18 killed in U.S. air strike on village in Pakistan”. Wikinews, January 14, 2006
  • “Pakistani Official claims ‘foreign terrorists’ among civilians killed in U.S. airstrike”. Wikinews, January 17, 2006

Sources

Wikipedia
Learn more about Pakistan and Drone on Wikipedia.
  • RTT Staff Writer “8 Killed In U.S. Drone Strikes”. RTTNews, December 22, 2008
  • “At least eight dead in Pakistan missile strike: officials”. Agence France-Presse, December 22, 2008
  • “Eight dead in US missile strike”. The Press Association, December 22, 2008
  • “‘Seven killed’ in Pakistan strike”. BBC, December 22, 2008
  • “Suspected U.S. missiles hit Pakistan areas”. CNN, December 22, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

US drone strike kills eight in Pakistan’s tribal region

Other stories from Pakistan
…More articles here
Location of Pakistan

A map showing the location of Pakistan

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Pakistan, see the Pakistan Portal
Portal:Pakistan

Monday, December 22, 2008

Pakistan Afghan Border. Location of the FATA and South Waziristan where the air strike took place.

A suspected United States military air strike launched by a remote-controlled and unmanned CIA aircraft on Monday morning killed at least 8 militants. Media reports claim that in two separate attacks, three missiles were fired by US drones at South Waziristan‘s Karikot and Shin Warsak villages, a tribal area in northwest Pakistan, well-known as center of Taliban and Al-Qaeda activity. The site of the attack is about nine miles (15 km) from the town of Wana in South Waziristan, an ungoverned tribal region.

South Waziristan is the southern part of Waziristan, a mountainous region of northwest Pakistan, bordering Afghanistan and covering some 11,585 km² (4,473 mi²). It comprises the area west and southwest of Peshawar between the Tochi River to the North and the Gomal river to the south, forming part of Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA). The North-West Frontier Province lies immediately to the east. The region was an independent tribal territory from 1893, remaining outside of British-ruled empire and Afghanistan. Tribal raiding into British-ruled territory was a constant problem for the British, requiring frequent punitive expeditions between 1860 and 1945. The region became part of Pakistan in 1947.

A senior security official said that “two vehicles fitted with guns were destroyed,” adding that “the eight people killed were all inside the vehicles.” Pakistani intelligence said they believed the extremists killed were members of local Pakistani Taliban groups. The reports also said that the missiles “targeted vehicles mounted with anti-aircraft guns, and one missile missed its intended target and landed near a house.” A local official said nine other extremists were wounded in the drone strike.

RQ-1 Predator Drone similar to the one alleged in the air strike.

Agence France-Presse has reported that “a missile attack late last month by a US jet killed Rashid Rauf, the alleged Al-Qaeda mastermind of a 2006 transatlantic airplane bombing plot, as well as an Egyptian Al-Qaeda operative, security officials have said.” US unmanned drones have launched not less than 20 missile attacks in Pakistan Afghan border or tribal areas since August. The strikes have raised tensions between Washington and Islamabad.

In November, Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani viewed these missile strikes as flagrant violation of Pakistan’s sovereignty and territorial integrity. He announced his government was considering “a number of options to counter attacks”. BBC has reported, however, that Pakistan “has been reluctant to move either diplomatically or militarily to stop these strikes.” “This has fuelled speculation that the attacks may be part of a secret pact between Pakistan and the US,” it added. Meanwhile, President George W. Bush, last week, said that “you know very well that when it comes to certain matters, the U.S. government doesn’t discuss operations.” He ruled out consultations with other governments, including Pakistan, prior to drone strikes operations.


Related news

  • “18 killed in U.S. air strike on village in Pakistan”. Wikinews, January 14, 2006
  • “Pakistani Official claims ‘foreign terrorists’ among civilians killed in U.S. airstrike”. Wikinews, January 17, 2006

Sources

Wikipedia
Learn more about Pakistan and Drone on Wikipedia.
  • RTT Staff Writer “8 Killed In U.S. Drone Strikes”. RTTNews, December 22, 2008
  • “At least eight dead in Pakistan missile strike: officials”. Agence France-Presse, December 22, 2008
  • “Eight dead in US missile strike”. The Press Association, December 22, 2008
  • “‘Seven killed’ in Pakistan strike”. BBC, December 22, 2008
  • “Suspected U.S. missiles hit Pakistan areas”. CNN, December 22, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

US drone strike kills eight in Pakistan’s tribal region

Other stories from Pakistan
…More articles here
Location of Pakistan

A map showing the location of Pakistan

To write, edit, start or view other articles on Pakistan, see the Pakistan Portal
Portal:Pakistan

Monday, December 22, 2008

Pakistan Afghan Border. Location of the FATA and South Waziristan where the air strike took place.

A suspected United States military air strike launched by a remote-controlled and unmanned CIA aircraft on Monday morning killed at least 8 militants. Media reports claim that in two separate attacks, three missiles were fired by US drones at South Waziristan‘s Karikot and Shin Warsak villages, a tribal area in northwest Pakistan, well-known as center of Taliban and Al-Qaeda activity. The site of the attack is about nine miles (15 km) from the town of Wana in South Waziristan, an ungoverned tribal region.

South Waziristan is the southern part of Waziristan, a mountainous region of northwest Pakistan, bordering Afghanistan and covering some 11,585 km² (4,473 mi²). It comprises the area west and southwest of Peshawar between the Tochi River to the North and the Gomal river to the south, forming part of Pakistan’s Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA). The North-West Frontier Province lies immediately to the east. The region was an independent tribal territory from 1893, remaining outside of British-ruled empire and Afghanistan. Tribal raiding into British-ruled territory was a constant problem for the British, requiring frequent punitive expeditions between 1860 and 1945. The region became part of Pakistan in 1947.

A senior security official said that “two vehicles fitted with guns were destroyed,” adding that “the eight people killed were all inside the vehicles.” Pakistani intelligence said they believed the extremists killed were members of local Pakistani Taliban groups. The reports also said that the missiles “targeted vehicles mounted with anti-aircraft guns, and one missile missed its intended target and landed near a house.” A local official said nine other extremists were wounded in the drone strike.

RQ-1 Predator Drone similar to the one alleged in the air strike.

Agence France-Presse has reported that “a missile attack late last month by a US jet killed Rashid Rauf, the alleged Al-Qaeda mastermind of a 2006 transatlantic airplane bombing plot, as well as an Egyptian Al-Qaeda operative, security officials have said.” US unmanned drones have launched not less than 20 missile attacks in Pakistan Afghan border or tribal areas since August. The strikes have raised tensions between Washington and Islamabad.

In November, Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani viewed these missile strikes as flagrant violation of Pakistan’s sovereignty and territorial integrity. He announced his government was considering “a number of options to counter attacks”. BBC has reported, however, that Pakistan “has been reluctant to move either diplomatically or militarily to stop these strikes.” “This has fuelled speculation that the attacks may be part of a secret pact between Pakistan and the US,” it added. Meanwhile, President George W. Bush, last week, said that “you know very well that when it comes to certain matters, the U.S. government doesn’t discuss operations.” He ruled out consultations with other governments, including Pakistan, prior to drone strikes operations.


Related news

  • “18 killed in U.S. air strike on village in Pakistan”. Wikinews, January 14, 2006
  • “Pakistani Official claims ‘foreign terrorists’ among civilians killed in U.S. airstrike”. Wikinews, January 17, 2006

Sources

Wikipedia
Learn more about Pakistan and Drone on Wikipedia.
  • RTT Staff Writer “8 Killed In U.S. Drone Strikes”. RTTNews, December 22, 2008
  • “At least eight dead in Pakistan missile strike: officials”. Agence France-Presse, December 22, 2008
  • “Eight dead in US missile strike”. The Press Association, December 22, 2008
  • “‘Seven killed’ in Pakistan strike”. BBC, December 22, 2008
  • “Suspected U.S. missiles hit Pakistan areas”. CNN, December 22, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

UK legislation expands debt collectors’ powers

Filed under: Crime and law,Review,United Kingdom — admin @ 5:00 am

Monday, December 22, 2008

Crime and law
Related stories

Crime and law
More information at Wikipedia:

The United Kingdom Parliament is planning to expand the powers of bailiffs in pursuit of unpaid debts. While the new measures are not yet officially active, bailiffs are expected to soon be able to use force in entering debtors’ homes and restraining them.

The preemptive crackdown was introduced with predictions of hundreds of thousands of British citizens losing their homes to credit companies as the international financial crisis grows worse.

Previous to the proposed laws, bailiffs were not allowed to break into or enter homes unless the debtor was already there, or as a last resort. Force was also prohibited unless in self defense.

Justice Lord Bach stated the Act would not be made active until after Parliament had finished extensive consulting, and that the new powers of bailiffs would be carefully monitored.

Civil rights activists like Paul Nicolson of the Zacchaeus 2000 Trust, however, have heavily criticized the new laws, accusing them of destroying fundamental civil rights and stripping away “tried and tested protections that make a person’s home his castle and which have stood for centuries”.

A government spokesman said the Parliament was considering its options for implementing the new laws and would make an announcement soon.

Sources

  • Robert Winnett “Bailiffs to be allowed to use ‘reasonable force’ against debtors”. Telegraph.co.uk, December 21, 2008
  • Brian Brady “Bailiffs may get extra powers to enter homes”. The Independent, December 21, 2008
  • Jon Ungoed-Thomas “Bailiffs get power to use force on debtors”. Times Online UK, December 21, 2008
  • “New powers proposed for debt collectors”. Market Watch, December 21, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

UK legislation expands debt collectors’ powers

Filed under: Crime and law,Review,United Kingdom — admin @ 5:00 am

Monday, December 22, 2008

Crime and law
Related stories

Crime and law
More information at Wikipedia:

The United Kingdom Parliament is planning to expand the powers of bailiffs in pursuit of unpaid debts. While the new measures are not yet officially active, bailiffs are expected to soon be able to use force in entering debtors’ homes and restraining them.

The preemptive crackdown was introduced with predictions of hundreds of thousands of British citizens losing their homes to credit companies as the international financial crisis grows worse.

Previous to the proposed laws, bailiffs were not allowed to break into or enter homes unless the debtor was already there, or as a last resort. Force was also prohibited unless in self defense.

Justice Lord Bach stated the Act would not be made active until after Parliament had finished extensive consulting, and that the new powers of bailiffs would be carefully monitored.

Civil rights activists like Paul Nicolson of the Zacchaeus 2000 Trust, however, have heavily criticized the new laws, accusing them of destroying fundamental civil rights and stripping away “tried and tested protections that make a person’s home his castle and which have stood for centuries”.

A government spokesman said the Parliament was considering its options for implementing the new laws and would make an announcement soon.

Sources

  • Robert Winnett “Bailiffs to be allowed to use ‘reasonable force’ against debtors”. Telegraph.co.uk, December 21, 2008
  • Brian Brady “Bailiffs may get extra powers to enter homes”. The Independent, December 21, 2008
  • Jon Ungoed-Thomas “Bailiffs get power to use force on debtors”. Times Online UK, December 21, 2008
  • “New powers proposed for debt collectors”. Market Watch, December 21, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

UK legislation expands debt collectors’ powers

Filed under: Crime and law,Review,United Kingdom — admin @ 5:00 am

Monday, December 22, 2008

Crime and law
Related stories

Crime and law
More information at Wikipedia:

The United Kingdom Parliament is planning to expand the powers of bailiffs in pursuit of unpaid debts. While the new measures are not yet officially active, bailiffs are expected to soon be able to use force in entering debtors’ homes and restraining them.

The preemptive crackdown was introduced with predictions of hundreds of thousands of British citizens losing their homes to credit companies as the international financial crisis grows worse.

Previous to the proposed laws, bailiffs were not allowed to break into or enter homes unless the debtor was already there, or as a last resort. Force was also prohibited unless in self defense.

Justice Lord Bach stated the Act would not be made active until after Parliament had finished extensive consulting, and that the new powers of bailiffs would be carefully monitored.

Civil rights activists like Paul Nicolson of the Zacchaeus 2000 Trust, however, have heavily criticized the new laws, accusing them of destroying fundamental civil rights and stripping away “tried and tested protections that make a person’s home his castle and which have stood for centuries”.

A government spokesman said the Parliament was considering its options for implementing the new laws and would make an announcement soon.

Sources

  • Robert Winnett “Bailiffs to be allowed to use ‘reasonable force’ against debtors”. Telegraph.co.uk, December 21, 2008
  • Brian Brady “Bailiffs may get extra powers to enter homes”. The Independent, December 21, 2008
  • Jon Ungoed-Thomas “Bailiffs get power to use force on debtors”. Times Online UK, December 21, 2008
  • “New powers proposed for debt collectors”. Market Watch, December 21, 2008
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
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