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April 22, 2009

Tonga renews emergency regulations

Filed under: Archived,Oceania,Politics and conflicts,Tonga — admin @ 5:00 am

Tonga renews emergency regulations – Wikinews, the free news source

Tonga renews emergency regulations

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Wednesday, April 22, 2009

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The Tongan government has extended the state of emergency in the capital, Nukuʻalofa, for another month.

The move has been criticised as unnecessary by the chairman of the Tonga Civil Society Forum, Drew Havea. He says that life is now back to normal in the capital, and blames a group of Nukuʻalofa businessmen for the rollover.

“We are not sure why they are taking that particular action because we don’t see any issue but that’s their right. If they want to petition for rolling over these emergency regulations, there’s not much we can do, on our part,” he said.

The emergency regulations were originally put in place two and a half years ago, as a response to the 2006 Nuku’alofa riots, and have been renewed monthly ever since. They give police wide powers to search, detain and arrest people without warrant within Nukuʻalofa’s CBD in order to protect public safety.

Central Nukuʻalofa was severely damaged by pro-democracy riots on November 17, 2006.



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Earth Day 2009 celebrated around the globe

Earth Day 2009 celebrated around the globe

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Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

Unofficial Earth Day flag, by John McConnell: the Blue Marble on a blue background.

Today is the 39th observance of Earth Day in the northern hemisphere. Earth day is celebrated in Autumn on November 30 in the southern hemisphere. Senator Gaylord Nelson initiated the first Earth Day in April 1970 in the United States, and it is now celebrated by over 1 billion people in over 170 countries worldwide. Earth Day is the biggest environmental event which addresses issues and educates people on environmental awareness on a global scale.

This year, National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) will beam high-definition images to the NASA website and television. By doing so, NASA hopes to increase appreciation of global climate issues. There will also be a Washington exhibit relating to environmental issues viewed from space as well.

At the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center activities will focus on their slogan for Earth Day 2009, “Just One Drop … PRICELESS” and will demonstrate how the Environmental Control Life Support System operates as used on the International Space Staton (ISS).

Amongst the many festivals, WorldFest is a solar powered music celebration held in Los Angeles, California. Buenos Aires will also feature its second Earth Day event featuring a music festival as well.

“We are in a new era of energy innovation,” said Daniel Yergin at a Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) forum. Lithium-ion batteries are providing electric storage solutions for electric cars such as the Chevrolet Volt and the Dodge Circuit EV. Algae fuel is a new form of biofuel, but is still under development.

“Energy Smackdown” was a competitive household activity which compared energy usage between 60 separate households across three cities in or near Boston. The various competitors came up with a variety of innovative methods to cut their carbon footprint, installing solar electric panels, geothermal heat pumps, wind turbines, and using a caulking gun to seal the home from drafts.

“In the average home, 75 percent of the electricity used to power home electronics is consumed while the products are turned off.” is a United States Department of Energy (DOE) estimate.

Miami is installing a smart grid which will use individual household smart meters to allow energy consumers know via a web site, their exact home energy usage. “To me these are prudent and smart investments that will easily pay for themselves. It will show the nation how to address environmental, energy, and economic challenges all at the same time.” said Miami mayor Manny Diaz.

Cal Dooley, CEO of the American Chemistry Council ACC, says the plastic bag industry is prepared to spend US$50 million to revamp their manufacturing facilities and will collect 470 million pounds of recycled plastic every year to make plastic bags of 40% recycled content. The ACC is providing a donation to the Keep America Beautiful environmental organisation, both of whom endorse this new project. The Earth Day Network (EDN) and Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) would like to see an end to the use of plastic bags, however. “We don’t want people to use disposable bags. We want people to use reusable bags,” says Darby Hoover of the NRDC.

Calgary researchers will begin field surveys to help save the “Northern Leopard Frog (Rana Pipiens). “Northern Leopard Frogs are threatened in Alberta, but endangered in British Columbia,” said Dr. Des Smith, Primary Investigator and Research Scientist with the Calgary Zoo’s Centre for Conservation Research. “It is essential to develop new monitoring techniques for Northern Leopard” said Breana McKnight, Field Team Leader and Endangered Species Researcher.

The traditional Earth day ceremony of planting trees is garnering further attention in Japan as Koichi Nakatani, the nation’s Tree Planting Father travels from Hokkaido to Okinawa.

Students can take part in an Earth Day photo contest sponsored by the Institute for Global Environmental Strategies which will feature images and scientific student research for the environmental change depicted in each photo submitted.

“Earth Day should be about teaching about the environment every day,” said Sean Mille director of education for EDN, “We emphasize taking action for your classroom, school, district or community.” 25,000 schools across America made use of the environmental curriculum developed by the National Civic Education Project, the Green Schools Campaign and the Educator’s Network. Lesson plans are broad and varied and may focus on water pollution, recycling, composting, using chemistry to convert cafeteria left-overs into biodiesel or ethanol fuel or converting go-carts to operate on biodiesel or ethanol fuels in shop class.



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Wikipedia Learn more about Earth Day on Wikipedia.

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Mountaineers \’Climb Up\’ for AIDS funding

Mountaineers ‘Climb Up’ for AIDS funding

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

To raise funding and awareness for children living with AIDS in Africa, the tallest mountain peak in every state in the United States will be scaled this spring. The American Foundation for Children with AIDS (AFCA), in partnership with the American Alpine Institute, is sponsoring “Climb Up the 50.”

Funding from this synchronized climb-a-thon will pay for the uphill battle to support children with AIDS. Funds raised will cover AIDS-related medication, supplies, and food for children infected with the disease in the hardest-hit countries, including Kenya, Uganda, and Zimbabwe.

The program includes Climb Up the 50, Climb Up the World, and Climb Up Kilimanjaro. Climb Up the 50 is based in the United States, with participants climbing or hiking up the highest point in their state sometime during May 23–31. Other teams of people will join them to climb the highest peak in their state.

File:HuffPo Mount Kilimanjaro.jpg

Mount Kilimanjaro.
Image: Jim Luce – Huffington Post.
(Image missing from commons: image; log)

Florida has the lowest peak, with an elevation of only 345 feet above sea level. The highest peak in the country is located in Alaska — Denali (Mount McKinley) — at over 20,000 feet above sea level. A team’s goal is to raise US$5,000 for the organization while individuals raise either $90, $180, or $360.

Climb Up the World participants can engage in the event by running, climbing, hiking or cycling — where ever in the world they are — on September 19 or 20.

Each person who registers to take part in the event can either raise $90, $180, or $360. Each amount is the equivalent of 3 months, 6 months, or one full-year of life-saving medication for a child. The $25 registration fee covers all administrative costs so all raised donations will be used for AFCA-related programs. Teams raise $5,000.

The Climb Up Kilimanjaro is the most daring event. The team consists of 12 brave people who will climb up Mount Kilimanjaro — at 19,330 feet, the highest peak in Africa. The Kilimanjaro team wishes to raise $10,000 per person to cover costs of climbing and the money needed for the AFCA’s initiatives. This 10-day climb will take place September 11–24.

The mountain climbing apparel manufacturer Merrell has agreed to donate the footwear needed to the 12 members of the Kilimanjaro team.

File:HuffPo American Foundation for Children with AIDS 1.jpg

African children.
Image: Jim Luce – Huffington Post.
(Image missing from commons: image; log)

“AFCA has received tremendous support from the climbing community around the world,” Tanya Weaver, executive director of the AFCA, said. “We think the challenge of climbing to the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro is an appropriate symbol for the uphill battle HIV/AIDS children face.”

This viral event is not just limited to climbing. The AFCA invites anyone and everyone to climb, hike, bike, or run for whatever distance to raise money for the children.

Corporations are encouraged to either sponsor, match donations, or organize a team of their own. Non-participants of the fundraiser can go the AFCA’s website for the program and sponsor one of the climbers for the Climb Up Kilimanjaro part of the program.

The AFCA’s assistance in HIV/AIDS stricken countries does not go unnoticed. Children who have received care from hospitals funded by the organization have sent letters of appreciation, which can be viewed on their website.

“The organization I founded ten years ago, Orphans International Worldwide, has a community center at the base of Mount Kilimanjaro at OI Tanzania, serving AIDS orphans and other children,” Jim Luce said. “Hopefully the Kilimanjaro team will stop by and visit the children currently staying there before they embark on their ten-day journey up the highest peak in Africa.”



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

External links

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This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Mountaineers ‘Climb Up’ for AIDS funding

Filed under: Africa,Health,Original reporting,United States — admin @ 5:00 am

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

To raise funding and awareness for children living with AIDS in Africa, the tallest mountain peak in every state in the United States will be scaled this spring. The American Foundation for Children with AIDS (AFCA), in partnership with the American Alpine Institute, is sponsoring “Climb Up the 50.”

Funding from this synchronized climb-a-thon will pay for the uphill battle to support children with AIDS. Funds raised will cover AIDS-related medication, supplies, and food for children infected with the disease in the hardest-hit countries, including Kenya, Uganda, and Zimbabwe.

The program includes Climb Up the 50, Climb Up the World, and Climb Up Kilimanjaro. Climb Up the 50 is based in the United States, with participants climbing or hiking up the highest point in their state sometime during May 23–31. Other teams of people will join them to climb the highest peak in their state.

Mount Kilimanjaro.
Image: Jim Luce – Huffington Post.

Florida has the lowest peak, with an elevation of only 345 feet above sea level. The highest peak in the country is located in Alaska — Denali (Mount McKinley) — at over 20,000 feet above sea level. A team’s goal is to raise US$5,000 for the organization while individuals raise either $90, $180, or $360.

Climb Up the World participants can engage in the event by running, climbing, hiking or cycling — where ever in the world they are — on September 19 or 20.

Each person who registers to take part in the event can either raise $90, $180, or $360. Each amount is the equivalent of 3 months, 6 months, or one full-year of life-saving medication for a child. The $25 registration fee covers all administrative costs so all raised donations will be used for AFCA-related programs. Teams raise $5,000.

The Climb Up Kilimanjaro is the most daring event. The team consists of 12 brave people who will climb up Mount Kilimanjaro — at 19,330 feet, the highest peak in Africa. The Kilimanjaro team wishes to raise $10,000 per person to cover costs of climbing and the money needed for the AFCA’s initiatives. This 10-day climb will take place September 11–24.

The mountain climbing apparel manufacturer Merrell has agreed to donate the footwear needed to the 12 members of the Kilimanjaro team.

African children.
Image: Jim Luce – Huffington Post.

“AFCA has received tremendous support from the climbing community around the world,” Tanya Weaver, executive director of the AFCA, said. “We think the challenge of climbing to the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro is an appropriate symbol for the uphill battle HIV/AIDS children face.”

This viral event is not just limited to climbing. The AFCA invites anyone and everyone to climb, hike, bike, or run for whatever distance to raise money for the children.

Corporations are encouraged to either sponsor, match donations, or organize a team of their own. Non-participants of the fundraiser can go the AFCA’s website for the program and sponsor one of the climbers for the Climb Up Kilimanjaro part of the program.

The AFCA’s assistance in HIV/AIDS stricken countries does not go unnoticed. Children who have received care from hospitals funded by the organization have sent letters of appreciation, which can be viewed on their website.

“The organization I founded ten years ago, Orphans International Worldwide, has a community center at the base of Mount Kilimanjaro at OI Tanzania, serving AIDS orphans and other children,” Jim Luce said. “Hopefully the Kilimanjaro team will stop by and visit the children currently staying there before they embark on their ten-day journey up the highest peak in Africa.”


Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
  • Jim Luce “Mountaineers Climb Up so Kids with AIDS Can Grow Up”. Huffington Post, April 15, 2009

External links

  • Climb up so kids can grow up
  • Facebook event page
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Mountaineers ‘Climb Up’ for AIDS funding

Filed under: Health,Original reporting,United States — admin @ 5:00 am

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

To raise funding and awareness for children living with AIDS in Africa, the tallest mountain peak in every state in the United States will be scaled this spring. The American Foundation for Children with AIDS (AFCA), in partnership with the American Alpine Institute, is sponsoring “Climb Up the 50.”

Funding from this synchronized climb-a-thon will pay for the uphill battle to support children with AIDS. Funds raised will cover AIDS-related medication, supplies, and food for children infected with the disease in the hardest-hit countries, including Kenya, Uganda, and Zimbabwe.

The program includes Climb Up the 50, Climb Up the World, and Climb Up Kilimanjaro. Climb Up the 50 is based in the United States, with participants climbing or hiking up the highest point in their state sometime during May 23–31. Other teams of people will join them to climb the highest peak in their state.

Mount Kilimanjaro

Florida has the lowest peak, with an elevation of only 345 feet above sea level. The highest peak in the country is located in Alaska — Denali (Mount McKinley) — at over 20,000 feet above sea level. A team’s goal is to raise US$5,000 for the organization while individuals raise either $90, $180, or $360.

Climb Up the World participants can engage in the event by running, climbing, hiking or cycling — where ever in the world they are — on September 19 or 20.

Each person who registers to take part in the event can either raise $90, $180, or $360. Each amount is the equivalent of 3 months, 6 months, or one full-year of life-saving medication for a child. The $25 registration fee covers all administrative costs so all raised donations will be used for AFCA-related programs. Teams raise $5,000.

The Climb Up Kilimanjaro is the most daring event. The team consists of 12 brave people who will climb up Mount Kilimanjaro — at 19,330 feet, the highest peak in Africa. The Kilimanjaro team wishes to raise $10,000 per person to cover costs of climbing and the money needed for the AFCA’s initiatives. This 10-day climb will take place September 11–24.

The mountain climbing apparel manufacturer Merrell has agreed to donate the footwear needed to the 12 members of the Kilimanjaro team.

African children.

“AFCA has received tremendous support from the climbing community around the world,” Tanya Weaver, executive director of the AFCA, said. “We think the challenge of climbing to the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro is an appropriate symbol for the uphill battle HIV/AIDS children face.”

This viral event is not just limited to climbing. The AFCA invites anyone and everyone to climb, hike, bike, or run for whatever distance to raise money for the children.

Corporations are encouraged to either sponsor, match donations, or organize a team of their own. Non-participants of the fundraiser can go the AFCA’s website for the program and sponsor one of the climbers for the Climb Up Kilimanjaro part of the program.

The AFCA’s assistance in HIV/AIDS stricken countries does not go unnoticed. Children who have received care from hospitals funded by the organization have sent letters of appreciation, which can be viewed on their website.

“The organization I founded ten years ago, Orphans International Worldwide, has a community center at the base of Mount Kilimanjaro at OI Tanzania, serving AIDS orphans and other children,” Jim Luce said. “Hopefully the Kilimanjaro team will stop by and visit the children currently staying there before they embark on their ten-day journey up the highest peak in Africa.”


External links

  • Climb up so kids can grow up
  • Facebook event page

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
  • Jim Luce “Mountaineers Climb Up so Kids with AIDS Can Grow Up”. Huffington Post, April 15, 2009
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Mountaineers ‘Climb Up’ for AIDS funding

Filed under: Health,Original reporting,United States — admin @ 5:00 am

Wednesday, April 22, 2009

To raise funding and awareness for children living with AIDS in Africa, the tallest mountain peak in every state in the United States will be scaled this spring. The American Foundation for Children with AIDS (AFCA), in partnership with the American Alpine Institute, is sponsoring “Climb Up the 50.”

Funding from this synchronized climb-a-thon will pay for the uphill battle to support children with AIDS. Funds raised will cover AIDS-related medication, supplies, and food for children infected with the disease in the hardest-hit countries, including Kenya, Uganda, and Zimbabwe.

The program includes Climb Up the 50, Climb Up the World, and Climb Up Kilimanjaro. Climb Up the 50 is based in the United States, with participants climbing or hiking up the highest point in their state sometime during May 23–31. Other teams of people will join them to climb the highest peak in their state.

Mount Kilimanjaro

Florida has the lowest peak, with an elevation of only 345 feet above sea level. The highest peak in the country is located in Alaska — Denali (Mount McKinley) — at over 20,000 feet above sea level. A team’s goal is to raise US$5,000 for the organization while individuals raise either $90, $180, or $360.

Climb Up the World participants can engage in the event by running, climbing, hiking or cycling — where ever in the world they are — on September 19 or 20.

Each person who registers to take part in the event can either raise $90, $180, or $360. Each amount is the equivalent of 3 months, 6 months, or one full-year of life-saving medication for a child. The $25 registration fee covers all administrative costs so all raised donations will be used for AFCA-related programs. Teams raise $5,000.

The Climb Up Kilimanjaro is the most daring event. The team consists of 12 brave people who will climb up Mount Kilimanjaro — at 19,330 feet, the highest peak in Africa. The Kilimanjaro team wishes to raise $10,000 per person to cover costs of climbing and the money needed for the AFCA’s initiatives. This 10-day climb will take place September 11–24.

The mountain climbing apparel manufacturer Merrell has agreed to donate the footwear needed to the 12 members of the Kilimanjaro team.

African children.

“AFCA has received tremendous support from the climbing community around the world,” Tanya Weaver, executive director of the AFCA, said. “We think the challenge of climbing to the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro is an appropriate symbol for the uphill battle HIV/AIDS children face.”

This viral event is not just limited to climbing. The AFCA invites anyone and everyone to climb, hike, bike, or run for whatever distance to raise money for the children.

Corporations are encouraged to either sponsor, match donations, or organize a team of their own. Non-participants of the fundraiser can go the AFCA’s website for the program and sponsor one of the climbers for the Climb Up Kilimanjaro part of the program.

The AFCA’s assistance in HIV/AIDS stricken countries does not go unnoticed. Children who have received care from hospitals funded by the organization have sent letters of appreciation, which can be viewed on their website.

“The organization I founded ten years ago, Orphans International Worldwide, has a community center at the base of Mount Kilimanjaro at OI Tanzania, serving AIDS orphans and other children,” Jim Luce said. “Hopefully the Kilimanjaro team will stop by and visit the children currently staying there before they embark on their ten-day journey up the highest peak in Africa.”


External links

  • Climb up so kids can grow up
  • Facebook event page

Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.
  • Jim Luce “Mountaineers Climb Up so Kids with AIDS Can Grow Up”. Huffington Post, April 15, 2009
This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2 or any later version published by the Free Software Foundation; with no Invariant Sections, no Front-Cover Texts, and no Back-Cover Texts. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

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