Wiki Actu en

September 3, 2012

Medals awarded at final day of rowing at London Paralympics

Medals awarded at final day of rowing at London Paralympics

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
2012 Summer Paralympics

Trafalgar Square, London - London 2012 - countdown clock.jpg

Newest 2012 Paralympic stories
  • 29 June 2014: Medal-seeking Spanish men arrive at 2014 Goalball World Championships
  • 26 June 2014: Belgian men’s goalball team departs for Finland for World Championships
  • 3 January 2014: Wikinews interviews Australian wheelchair basketball player Tina McKenzie
  • 15 August 2013: Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic swimmer Deborah Font
  • 11 August 2013: Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic swimmer Marta Gómez

Monday, September 3, 2012

London, England — The final day of rowing at the London Paralympics took place yesterday at Eton Dorney, with all the medals being decided. China finished on top, earning two golds. Ukraine came in second in rowing medals with a gold and a bronze, Great Britain earned a gold, France earned a pair of silver medals, Australia and Germany won a silver medal, and Belarus and Russia each won a bronze.

Coming into the AS Men Single Sculls, Tom Aggar of Great Britain was the gold medal favourite having not lost a major international competition. He failed in his quest. Australia’s Erik Horrie claimed silver in the event despite being in the hospital 24 hours earlier. With a close finish, Australia’s fans initially thought he won bronze.

The TA Mixed Double Sculls race was a fight for bronze with Gavin Bellis and Kathryn Ross of Australia being just beaten by Oksana Masters and Rob Jones of the United States by less than a second to finish fifth.

Sebastian Coe, Prince Edward, the Duchess of Cambridge Kate Middleton and Australia’s Minister for Sport Kate Lundy were amongst the dignitaries that watched the medal races.

Final day of Paralympic rowing at Eton Dorney
Image: Laura Hale.

Final day of Paralympic rowing at Eton Dorney
Image: Laura Hale.

Final day of Paralympic rowing at Eton Dorney. The coaches ride alongside their rowers.
Image: Laura Hale.

Final day of Paralympic rowing at Eton Dorney
Image: Laura Hale.

Final day of Paralympic rowing at Eton Dorney
Image: Laura Hale.

Australia’s Gavin Bellis and Kathryn Ross
Image: Laura Hale.

Kate Lundy in yellow
Image: Laura Hale.

Next to woman in white hood Countess of Wessex, Prince Edward, Edward’s niece, Kate Middleton and Sebastien Coe
Image: Laura Hale.

Nathalie Benoit of France, Alla Lysenko of the Ukraine and Liudmila Vauchok of Belarus get their medals in the AS Women Single Sculls
Image: Laura Hale.

Erik Horrie of Australia celebrates his silver medal
Image: Laura Hale.

Oksana Masters and Rob Jones listen to the Chinese national anthem during the medal ceremony for the TA Mixed Double Sculls
Image: Laura Hale.

Rank Country Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 China 2 0 0 2
2 Ukraine 1 0 1 2
3 Great Britain 1 0 0 1
4 France 0 2 0 2
5 Australia 0 1 0 1
5 Germany 0 1 0 1
7 Russia 0 0 1 1
7 Belarus 0 0 1 1
7 United States 0 0 1 1



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Wikinews interviews Tyan Taylor, Australian goalbal player

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, September 3, 2012

London, England— Yesterday, following a three—nil loss to the United States, Wikinews interviewed Tyan Taylor of Australia‘s national goalball team.

Tyan Taylor, IPC publicity shot
Image: Australian Paralympic Committee.

Goalball was created in 1946 as a sport exclusively for people with a visual disability, and designed to help with the rehabilitation of veterans returning from World War II. Play in the Paralympics consists of two twelve-minute periods, with a three minute break between halves. Players are blindfolded to ensure all are equally visually handicapped on-court; and, the game can be stopped to ensure goggles are properly fitted. Standing in front of a long goal, they throw the ball at the opposition team’s net who in turn try to block it by listening to the ball, which contains a bell, and using their bodies to prevent the ball from going in. The audience is asked to remain silent during play.

Australia went into their match against the US having lost 1–3 to both Japan and Canada. They have one game left to play at the London Paralympics against Sweden, who have lost 1–5 to the United States, tied Japan 0–0 and beaten Canada 2–1.

Interview transcript

Wikinews waves Left.pngLaura HaleWikinews waves Right.png You guys weren’t expecting to qualify. The APC’s been developing you [the team, for Rio]. Are you happy with the fact? Do you feel prepared for Rio?

Tyan Taylor: Yes, the APC’s, for us, [planned] development for Rio. That’s what they have as the goal, to make us qualify for Rio. So it was a bit of a spanner in the works when we qualified for London; but, it’s been a massive experience here for us and we have stepped up from qualifying in Sydney in November to where we are now, to God know where we’re going to be for Rio. We are all pumped and excited for our team just to keep developing.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Two of you were dating, or involved with, men on the national team. Were they here to watch you?

TT: Yes! We’ve got some of our Aussie men as supporters in the crowd. Meica‘s husband and Nicole‘s husband as well. And we have our first mate Robbie, he’s also part of the men’s team. They’ve been with us and they’ve been supporting us since pretty much the start, so we’re doing it on behalf of them as well.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png I know that some of your players look shattered, but do you guys feel the importance? You’re the first Australian team to actually qualify on your own to enter the goalball programme.

TT: Yeah! I mean, some team members tried qualifying for Beijing, unfortunately we were unsuccessful. So, I think, some of us having only played the sport for three years and to qualify for London is just a massive achievement. We are grabbing every opportunity that we can, and putting everything on the table for each game.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Are you going to try playing more international competitions, so you don’t have that big lag like you did last time?

TT: Hopefully, we get more international competitions, exposure – I suppose – with that, but we’ve grown so much with the little amount of international exposure we’ve had so I think we’re going to take it and roll with that.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png You’re going to get a medal in Rio?

TT: Hopefully we’ll medal! We always look for the medals but you never know what is going to happen, so…

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Are you enjoying your time here?

TT: Yes! Absolutely loving it! Awesome! The crowd are just insane! It’s great. We are all having an absolute awesome time.

Wikinews waves Left.pngLaura HaleWikinews waves Right.png Do you have anything else you’d like to share with with us?

Wikinews waves Left.pngHawkeye7Wikinews waves Right.png Like the [mismatched] yellow and green socks as a fashion statement?

TT: Yeah! Yellow and green socks are… Meica in our team started that fashion. So we thought we’d all. The green and the gold.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png On a strategy thing, the US team stood up most of the time, but do you intentionally play differently, or is it just a style preference?

TT: For some people it’s a style preference. For some… I guess it’s more of a style preference. We all stand up between penalties but each to their own really in competitions like this.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png It’s exceptionally fun to watch, having never seen this sport before. Thank you very much.

TT: That’s alright!

Wikinews waves Left.pngHawkeye7Wikinews waves Right.png Good luck with Rio!

TT: Thank you very much.



Related news

Wikinews
This exclusive interview features first-hand journalism by a Wikinews reporter. See the collaboration page for more details.
  • “Australia women’s national goalball team loses 0-3 to United States in pool play in London” — Wikinews, September 4, 2012

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Wikinews interviews Tyan Taylor

Filed under: 2012 Summer Paralympics — admin @ 5:00 am
From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

2012 Summer Paralympics

Trafalgar Square, London - London 2012 - countdown clock.jpg

Newest 2012 Paralympic stories

Monday, September 3, 2012

Tyan Taylor
Image: Australian Paralympic Committee.

London, England — Yesterday, following a 3-0 loss to the United States, Wikinews interviewed Tyan Taylor of the Australian national goalball team.

Wikinews waves Left.pngLaura HaleWikinews waves Right.png You guys weren’t expecting to qualify. The APC’s been developing you for Rio. Are you happy with the fact? Do you feel prepared for Rio?
Tyan Taylor: Yes, the APC development has been for Rio. That’s what they have as the goal: to make us qualify for Rio. So it threw a bit of a spanner in the works when we qualified for London, but it’s been a massive experience here for us and we have stepped up from qualifying in Sydney in November to where we are now, so God know where we’re going to be for Rio. We are all pumped for our team just to keep developing.
Wikinews waves Left.pngLaura HaleWikinews waves Right.png Two of you were dating or involved with men on the men’s national team. Were they here to watch you?
TT: Yes! We’ve got some of our Aussie men as supporters in the crowd. Meica‘s husband and Nicole‘s husband as well. And we have our first mate Robbie, he’s also a member of the men’s team. They’ve been with us and they’ve been supporting us since pretty much the start, so we’re doing it on behalf of them as well.
Wikinews waves Left.pngLaura HaleWikinews waves Right.png I know that some of your players look shattered, but do you guys feel the importance. You’re the first Australian team to actually qualify on your own to enter the goal program.
TT: Yeah! I mean, for Beijing we were unfortunately unsuccessful, so I think, some of us having only played the sport for three years, to qualify for London is just a massive achievement. We are grabbing every opportunity that we can, and putting everything on the plate for each day.
Wikinews waves Left.pngLaura HaleWikinews waves Right.png Are you going to try playing more international competitions so you don’t have that big lag like you did last time?
TT: Hopefully, we get more international competitions, more exposure I suppose with that, but we’ve grown so much with the little amount of international exposure that we’ve had so I think we’re going to take it and roll with that.
Wikinews waves Left.pngLaura HaleWikinews waves Right.png You’re going to get a medal in Rio?
TT: Hopefully we’ll medal! We always look for the medals but you never know what is going to happen, so…
Wikinews waves Left.pngLaura HaleWikinews waves Right.png Are you enjoying your time here?
TT: Yes! Absolutely loving it! Awesome! The crowd are insane! It’s great. We are all having an absolute awesome time.
Wikinews waves Left.pngLaura HaleWikinews waves Right.png Do you have anything else you’d like to share with with us?
Wikinews waves Left.pngHawkeye7Wikinews waves Right.png Like the mismatched yellow and green socks as a fashion statement?
TT: Yeah! Yellow and green socks are… Meica in our team started that fashion. So we thought we’d all. The green and the gold.
Wikinews waves Left.pngLaura HaleWikinews waves Right.png On a strategy thing, the US team stood up most of the time, but do you intentionally play differently, or is it just a style thing?
TT: For some people it’s a style preference. For some… I guess it’s more of a style preference. We all stand up between penalties but each to their own really in competitions like this.
Wikinews waves Left.pngLaura HaleWikinews waves Right.png It’s exceptionally fun to watch, having never seen this sport before. Thank you very much.
TT: That’s alright!
Wikinews waves Left.pngHawkeye7Wikinews waves Right.png Good luck with Rio!
TT: Thank you very much.



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Philippine economic growth slows slightly in 2nd quarter of 2012

Philippine economic growth slows slightly in 2nd quarter of 2012

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, September 3, 2012

Philippines
Other stories from the Philippines
…More articles here
Location of the Philippines

A map showing the location of the Philippines

To write, edit, start or view other articles on the Philippines, see the Philippines Portal
Flag of the Philippines.svg

EDSA, the main thoroughfare of Manila.
Image: Exec8.

The Philippine economy grew by 5.9%, annual rate, during the second quarter of 2012 which is less than the first quarter’s figure of more than 6% annual rate, as reported by The Associated Press. According to Economic Planning Secretary Arsenio Balisacan, strong domestic demand from the services sector and spending from money remitted by expatriate Filipinos helped boost the nation’s economy despite the ongoing global economic crisis.

In spite of this growth, numerous risks still lurk around the corner, said Balisacan. He said that changes in China and the El Niño remain as the biggest challenges to the economy. Balsican also noted that poor infrastructure may also have a negative impact although spending on infrastructure, which may cost nearly $200 million in investment, may contribute to growth.

The Philippines central bank has cut key interest rates three times already this year in order to continue this economic expansion. Analysts, such as economist Eugene Leow of Singapore-based DBS bank, agree that, “There is definitely room to further cut rates if needed,” in order to promote further growth.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Slovakia\’s Alena Kanova defeats Sara Head, taking bronze in class 3 table tennis

Slovakia’s Alena Kanova defeats Sara Head, taking bronze in class 3 table tennis

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, September 3, 2012

2012 Summer Paralympics

Trafalgar Square, London - London 2012 - countdown clock.jpg

Newest 2012 Paralympic stories
  • 29 June 2014: Medal-seeking Spanish men arrive at 2014 Goalball World Championships
  • 26 June 2014: Belgian men’s goalball team departs for Finland for World Championships
  • 3 January 2014: Wikinews interviews Australian wheelchair basketball player Tina McKenzie
  • 15 August 2013: Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic swimmer Deborah Font
  • 11 August 2013: Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic swimmer Marta Gómez

Bronze medal match between Great Britain’s Sara Head and Slovakia’s Alena Kanova
Image: Laura Hale.

London, England— Slovakian fans were out in force at London’s ExCeL earlier today, watching the 23-minute table tennis match between Great Britain‘s Sara Head and their country’s Alena Kanova. The battle for bronze in the women’s single class 3 match ended with Kanova winning by 3 sets to 1 to take the medal.

Head took an early lead, winning the first set 11–2 before going down to Kanova in the second set by 5–11. Head kept the scoring closer in the third set at 4–7 at one point, before losing 5–11. The British fans dominated Slovakia in terms of volume, chanting “G-B! G-B!” in support of their player, with the occasional shout of “Go Sara!”. The Slovaks ruled the stands in terms of waving large flags. A loud chant from Great Britain’s fans stopped abruptly after Kanova scored. Head could not come back in the fourth set, losing 3–11 and seeing Kanova take the bronze.

In the gold medal match on the main table, Austria‘s Doris Mader lost to Sweden‘s Anna-Carin Ahlquist, with Ahlquist receiving loud support from her teammates and coaches. She won 11–4, 11–6 and 11–5 in straight sets.



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Fifteen medals awarded on London Paralympics fourth night of track and field

Fifteen medals awarded on London Paralympics fourth night of track and field

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, September 3, 2012

2012 Summer Paralympics

Trafalgar Square, London - London 2012 - countdown clock.jpg

Newest 2012 Paralympic stories
  • 29 June 2014: Medal-seeking Spanish men arrive at 2014 Goalball World Championships
  • 26 June 2014: Belgian men’s goalball team departs for Finland for World Championships
  • 3 January 2014: Wikinews interviews Australian wheelchair basketball player Tina McKenzie
  • 15 August 2013: Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic swimmer Deborah Font
  • 11 August 2013: Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic swimmer Marta Gómez

London, England— Fifteen Paralympic gold medals were awarded Sunday night, the fourth night of competition at London’s Olympic Park.

As runners raced around the track, a ‘wall of sound’ from the crowd followed them. Given the potential for confusion about Paralympic classification, commentators and video screens provided repeated explanations of relevant classifications. In the centre of the field, during the men’s 400 metre heats and other finals, javelin competitors’ efforts were greeted with “oohs and aahs” from the stadium whilst their throws were in-flight; a remote-controlled car was used to return javelins to the competitors. Great Britain‘s win in the discus final prompted the crowd to sing along to the national anthem during the medal ceremony. No other country enjoyed quite the same level of flag waving and singing during subsequent medal ceremonies.

Athletics gets under way with a javelin player warming up
Image: Laura Hale.

The car retrieves the javelins
Image: Laura Hale.

400m T12 Men Heat 1 enters the stadium
Image: Laura Hale.

400m T12 Men Heat 2 enters the stadium
Image: Laura Hale.

Officials prepare for the start of the 400m T12 Men Heat 2
Image: Laura Hale.

Spanish runners enter the field of play for the start of 400m T12 Men Heat 3
Image: Laura Hale.

Mahmoud Khaldi of Tunisia prepares for the start of the men’s 400m — T12 Heat 3
Image: Laura Hale.

Scoreboard during the men’s javelin F44 final showing China, Netherlands, France, Russia, India, Canada and the United States.
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 200 m final T11 is underway
Image: Laura Hale.

First place winner Brazilian Terezinha Guilhermina and her guide Guilherme Soares de Santana across the line in the women’s 200 m final T11 is underway
Image: Laura Hale.

A Great Britain athlete gets his medal for discus in an event held earlier in the Games
Image: Laura Hale.

Runners sprint towards the finish mens 200m T46
Image: Laura Hale.

Men’s 100 m T36 final get off the mark
Image: Laura Hale.

Men’s 100 m T36 final cross the line
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 100 m T52 final
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 100 m T52 final
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 100 m T52 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 100 m T12 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 100 m T12 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 100 m T12 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Clegg celebrates her medal
Image: Laura Hale.

Simon Patmore of Australia gets his medal from a final earlier in the day
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 400 m T53
Image: Laura Hale.

The women’s 100 m T37 starts
Image: Laura Hale.

The women’s 100 m T37 is almost done
Image: Laura Hale.

Mandy Francois-Elie of France and Johanna Benson of Namibia
Image: Laura Hale.

Mandy Francois-Elie of France and Johanna Benson of Namibia
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 100 m T54 final
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 100 m T54 final
Image: Laura Hale.

The crowd when Great Britain’s Libby as given her silver medal
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 200 m T44 final which Oscar Pistorius ran in
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 200 m T44 final which Oscar Pistorius ran in
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 200 m T44 final which Oscar Pistorius ran in
Image: Laura Hale.

The men’s 200 m T44 final which Oscar Pistorius ran in
Image: Laura Hale.

A discus is delivered back to an athlete
Image: Laura Hale.

French athletes sing along to the national anthem as Mandy Francois-Elie gets her gold
Image: Laura Hale.

A race towards the finish in the men’s 400 m T13 event
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 100 m T44 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 100 m T44 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 100 m T44 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 100 m T53 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Women’s 100 m T53 final
Image: Laura Hale.

Women, competing in the two blind classification finals, ran almost-exclusively with male guide runners. The entrants in the men’s F11 discus competition also had guides helping position them on the field, and ensuring they threw onto the field of play.

Preceded by heats for the men’s 400 metres T12 event, the first final of the night was the women’s 200 metres T11, won by Brazilian Terezinha Guilhermina with her guide Guilherme Soares de Santana.

In the women’s 100 metres T12 final, that Chinese competitor Guohua Zhou and her guide Jie Li finished first was of secondary importance to the home crowd, whose cheers grew louder following the announcement that Great Britain’s Libby Clegg, and guide-runner Mikhail Huggins, came in second. The pair did a celebratory lap around the stadium, briefly stopping as a medal was awarded for one of the earlier events. At the end of their victory lap, Clegg hugged her coach whilst Huggins knuckle-bumped athletes standing at the edge of the stadium before being joined by Clegg for hugs from team-mates.

Whilst Katrina Hart and Jenny McLoughlin of Great Britain received the loudest cheers when announced for the women’s 100 metres T37 event, Namibia’s Johanna Benson was also vocally encouraged by the crowd; starting without the use of blocks, she earned a silver, finishing behind France‘s Mandy Francois-Elie by 15 hundredths of a second. There was a delay in announcing the bronze medallist, ultimately Neda Bahi of Tunisia, because of the closeness of the finish which came down to a hundredth of a second separating her from fourth-placed Maria Seifert of Germany. Later in the night, immediately following Oscar Pistorius‘s 200 metres T44 final, Francois-Elie was awarded her gold medal whilst French athletes loudly sang their national anthem.

Pistorius’s race was near the end of the programme, with the announcer hyping it throughout the evening’s competition. When the announcer said Pistorius had entered the field of play, the crowd screamed. As he finally stepped up to be introduced the volume increased, and cameras flashed around the stadium. Pistorius ran his race taking the silver, losing to Brazilian Alan Fonteles Cardoso Oliveira by less than a tenth of a second.

Australians had a successful night, with Carlee Beattie earning a silver in the women’s long jump F46 event, Kurt Fearnley earning a silver in the men’s 5,000 metres T54, Angela Ballard earning a bronze in the women’s 100 metres T53 event and Simon Patmore earning bronze in the men’s 200 metres T46 event. Ballard, competing in her fourth Games, said following her race: “It’s really good especially after how I did at Beijing. So to go home with a medal is great. Hopefully I can do more with that over the rest of the week.”

Hosts Great Britain had a better night, earning a number of medals including David Weir taking gold in the men’s 5,000 metres T54, Graeme Ballard silver in the men’s 100 metres T36, Libby Clegg and her guide runner Mikhail Huggins winning silver in the women’s 100 metres T12.

Current leader in medals China added more to their tally, including gold and silver for Lisha Huang and Honghuan Zhou in the women’s 100 metres T53 event, gold in the women’s 100 metres T12 for Guohua Zhou and her guide Jie Li, silver for Yang Liu in the men’s 100 metres T54, a bronze taken by Juntingxian Jia and guide Donglin Xu in the women’s 200 metres T11 and a bronze in the women’s long jump T46 for Jingling Ouyang.

The United States picked up a few additional medals too, including a gold earned by Raymond Martin, a bronze taken by Paul Nitz in the men’s 100 metres T52 event, bronze for April Holmes in the women’s 100 metres T53 event and bronze for Blake Leeper in the men’s 200 metres T44 event.



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Slovenia goes down to China in their final sitting volleyball game in pool play at London Paralympics

Slovenia goes down to China in their final sitting volleyball game in pool play at London Paralympics

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search
2012 Summer Paralympics

Trafalgar Square, London - London 2012 - countdown clock.jpg

Newest 2012 Paralympic stories
  • 29 June 2014: Medal-seeking Spanish men arrive at 2014 Goalball World Championships
  • 26 June 2014: Belgian men’s goalball team departs for Finland for World Championships
  • 3 January 2014: Wikinews interviews Australian wheelchair basketball player Tina McKenzie
  • 15 August 2013: Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic swimmer Deborah Font
  • 11 August 2013: Wikinews interviews Spanish Paralympic swimmer Marta Gómez

Monday, September 3, 2012

Yu Hong of China serves the ball during the first set
Image: Laura Hale.

London, England — In the first match of sitting volleyball this morning at ExCeL’s South Arena 2, the Chinese women defeated Slovenia 3 sets to 0 in a half empty arena with minimal press in attendance. The game was the last one in pool play for both teams and China left the game at the top of their group in group play.

With spectators equaling half the total who watched the Great Britain versus Ukraine match earlier at the Games, China won the first set 25–12 before a crowd full of home town fans. In the press area, volunteers assisting with the games — so-called Games Makers — outnumbered the press, which included three Slovenes and Wikinews at the start, before they were joined by a trio of Chinese reporters who showed up half way through the first set. The limited partisan support available for one of the teams on the court was found in the corner, and the Slovenes were waving their flag during time outs and when Slovenia scored.

China went on to win the second set 24–15, with the Slovenes able to fight back and narrow the score at times but never seriously challenge the Chinese lead. A Chinese supporter with a flag made their presence known during Slovenia’s second time out in the second set by waving it when asked which side fans were supporting.

The Slovenes were in it early in the third set, only behind 5–4 at one point before leveling at 6–6 and going ahead 6–7, which was their first lead of the game. With Slovenia holding a lead of 7–8, a long volley followed which ended with Slovenia celebrating a point only for it to be awarded to China, which tied the score again and China came back for scores to sit at 13–8. At this point, Slovenia called their second time out. The relatively quiet audience only got loud with commentator direction. While two Chinese flags waved during timeouts, the Chinese media who showed up midway through the first set left the press tribunes by midway through the third set. The Slovenes attempted to stay in it, but ended the set 25–16.

Entering the tournament as the number-one ranked team in the world, China came into the game having beaten the United States in their opening game 3 sets to 1, then going on to beat Brazil by the same total. In contrast, the Slovenes who are ranked fifth in the world went down to the United States 0 to 3 in straight sets, then down to Brazil by 2 sets to 3.

Other sitting volleyball games scheduled today include men’s games with Great Britain playing Germany, Bosnia and Herzegovina playing Rwanda, and Iran playing Brazil, women’s games with the Ukraine playing Japan, the United States playing Brazil.



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Asia League Ice Hockey starts this weekend

Filed under: Disputed — admin @ 5:00 am
From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, September 3, 2012

Asia League Ice Hockey 10 year Logo

Asia League Ice hockey is scheduled to start the 2012-2013 season September 8. Six of the seven teams wil play in Japan and South Korea. Unlike previous years, China Dragon will participate in the opening weekend. Rival countrymen Anyang Halla and High1 will face each other in Anyang, South Korea. Defending champs Oji Eagles will take on the Tohoku Freeblades in Tomokomai, Japan and Nikko Icebucks will play against the China Dragon at Nikko, Japan. The League has changed its schedule this year having each team meet seven times during the regular season. The teams had been meeting six times a season since the 08/09 season. As part of the schedule changes the League has scheduled several double-header games during the season where four teams will play in the same rink on the same day. The first of such will take place on September 29 at Yokohama, Japan.

The season will run September 8, 2012-March 3, 2013 with the playoffs beginning on March 9, 2013. The top four teams from the regular season will advance to the playoffs. The League is celebrating its tenth year of operation



Sources

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Wikinews interviews winner of 55 Paralympic medals, Trischa Zorn

Wikinews interviews winner of 55 Paralympic medals, Trischa Zorn

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Monday, September 3, 2012

Trischa Zorn
Image: Laura Hale.

Listen to the unedited interview

2012 Summer Paralympics

Trafalgar Square, London - London 2012 - countdown clock.jpg

Newest 2012 Paralympic stories

London, England— Last Friday, Wikinews interviewed Trischa Zorn, 55-time medal-winner. The U.S. Paralympic swimmer’s haul includes 41 golds.

Zorn discussed a variety of issues, including frustration with the classification system that has disadvantaged some United States swimmers because of what she sees as its subjective nature. She also talked about the increased visibility of the Games, how things have changed from when she started in 1980 to the current 2012 Summer Paralympics. Zorn discussed how sponsorship has evolved from her early time participating, and issues with the Paralympics inside the United States at the present.

This year Zorn was inducted into the International Paralympic Hall of Fame at a ceremony in London. Having last competed in the 2004 Summer Paralympics, if she was swimming today, she would be classified as an S12 swimmer. She currently works for the United States Department of Veterans Affairs, helping returning soldiers adjust to life as civilians.

Interview transcript

Wikinews waves Left.pngLaura HaleWikinews waves Right.png We do Wikinews, which is related to Wikipedia … And, your article on Wikipedia sucks.
Trischa Zorn: Right
Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png The sources don’t agree on how many [Paralympic] medals you won. So how many medals have you won?
TZ: 55 medals. 41 gold, nine silver and five bronze.
Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png More gold medals than the next nearest total medal winner.
TZ: Correct
Wikinews waves Left.pngHawkeye7Wikinews waves Right.png In fact, the next two, three, maybe four, put together.
TZ: Correct
Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png You started [Paralympic] swimming in 1980.
TZ: My first games was in 1980, and my last games was in 2004 in Athens.
Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png 2004?
TZ: Yes. Eight years ago.
Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png And you medalled there?
TZ: I got a bronze. I was only swimming in two events.
Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png And you remember all 55?
TZ: I know what events I swam. Relays and stuff. The discrepancy is because early on they weren’t really keeping track of the events. Like my first games in 1980, I won seven medals, and they only recorded five. In 1984, because the games were in New York, and because of the boycott, from when we boycotted in 1980, not a lot of European countries came over. So there wasn’t a lot of statistic keeping.
Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png We have found the IPC database had a lot of problems on the Australian side. We have been correcting that.
TZ: I have a whole list of all the events.What ones I won. A British writer was writing a book and wanted to include me, so I collated all my results and sent it to her.
Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png When you started in 1980, did they have the three categories for blind swimming?
TZ: They had the three categories, but they weren’t like S categories now. There was B1 for blind, B2 and B3. I was in the middle, a B2. The equivalent to S12 now.
Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Has classification on the blind sports side changed much since you started?
TZ: They would like it to be in the regular classification S1 to S10. They would like everybody to be all one and use a points system. But I’m not a big fan of the points system, and I’m not a big fan of the classification procedure.
Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Blind sports is the only medically based classification left. The rest are all functionality based.
TZ: Correct
Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png They are moving towards an evidence based system, but I’m not sure what that is.
TZ: Unfortunately, the classifications are very subjective. And a lot of the classifications, they don’t go by actual evidence of medical documentation, it’s what you can do in the water. So, for example, we have one of our athletes, Mallory Weggemann, that was an S7. She had multiple world records as an S7 and two days before she was supposed to comes here the IPC says: “We want to reclassify you. We want to do your classification all over” So she came here and they put her through a dry land regimen of classification. Then they said “let’s get you in the water. We’ll classify you there.” Then they said: “Oh no! You’re an S8!” Even though she had medical documentation to say that she was a T10 paraplegic with no function in her legs.
Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Did classification ever effect you?
TZ: Not with me, but there has been problems with the S13. It’s supposed to be best corrected. There have been people that I swam against in the past that two years later were disqualified. Their vision, now they found out, was too good. It’s very subjective. There needs to be a test where they can see what you can see. Because, as an athlete, you go in and somebody says: “Can you see this?” or “Can you read that?”
Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png You’re involved with the veterans? On the sports side?
TZ: I work for the Department of Veterans’ Affairs.
Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png How long have you worked for them?
TZ: I have worked for them for a year now. I actually see some of the veterans like Brad that have come back lately, and how they have come through Walter Reed. I work more on the business side of it. But its still nice to see that they are being welcomed back, being provided opportunities for sports. Things that they thought that they would never be able to do.
Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png One of the criticisms of the US Paralympic Committee, and I don’t want to get you in trouble, is that the reason that the US is having problems right now with funding support is that they have been focused on veterans, and ignoring other people with disabilities. Would you care to comment on that?
TZ: Well I think that anything in the US that deals with veterans, the US is very passionate about, and sports, unfortunately, amateur sports, have become a business. And any kind of funding through the Department of Defense, going for veterans and whatever programs they are involved in is very important. But, as I’ve always said, funds always end up drying up. They’re not always going to be there, so you can’t depend strictly on that. Therefore, you need to have a well-rounded funding base, not just for veterans, for all athletes.
Wikinews waves Left.pngHawkeye7Wikinews waves Right.png Where does funding normally come from in the United States?
Wikinews waves Left.pngLaura HaleWikinews waves Right.png Hawkeye7’s an Australian, so his model is that the government pays for sport.
TZ: It’s funny, I look and I see what the Paralympic athletes get now, and what we even got in ’08 compared to when I first came. We had to pay to go to the Paralympics. We had to pay for our uniforms. It was only from Sydney that we didn’t have to pay anything, and we were provided uniforms. So each games has built on certain things. So, for example, 1988 was the first time that we had the same venues as the Olympics. ’92 was the first time that we were able to actually hear our national anthem, because before you didn’t, you just heard a games recording. So then in ’96 obviously because it was in the US, I think they thought that that was going to bring more awareness, and it did to an extent; but, once it was gone it kind of dwindled away. And then, in 2000 in Sydney, things had become … we were the first – there were four of us – we were able to train at an Olympic training centre. Not with the team, but we were able to use the facilities at the Olympic training centre full-time. But now they have a full time resident program. They are not training alongside Olympic athletes, but at least they are funded by the Olympic Committee. They get to train there, they get to live there. So things have changed. And then people argue about prize money, and sponsorship. It’s different.
Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Do you think they should be sponsored? In Australia, Evan O’Hanlon, he’s an athlete, he has cerebral palsy, her covers his shoes with tape, because he feels that he is advertising for whoever makes his shoes, and he feels that he should get sponsorship. Do you think that we have reached the point with disability sports on the world stage where the elite athletes should be sponsored?
TZ: Well I think that there are certain talented athletes in the US that are now getting the global sponsors such as Jessica Long being a Visa athlete and having opportunities with Coke. And Rudy Garcia-Tolson with BP. And those big companies are jumpingon board and seeing the opportunities not just from a marketing standpoint, but you are allowing the young athletes to see that and touch it, and before it wasn’t. I mean you are basically competing because you love the sport. Now it’s just like Olympic athletes. They know what the possibilities of an outcome is going to be. Now, granted, Paralympic athletes don’t get $50,000 for a gold medal, or $10,000 for a bronze. We’d be lucky if we get $5,000 or $10,000.
Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Do you think that all 55 of your Paralympic medals are equivalent to Olympic medals?
TZ: They are equivalent in respect that I did the same training as any Olympic athlete. I trained alongside able bodied athletes in the club setting where I trained, and a college setting.
Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Which clubs and which colleges was that?
TZ: Actually, when I was younger I swam for San Diego Matadors down in California, and in college at the University of Nebraska, and then when I moved to Indiana I was training there with a coach it was with the Riviera Swim Club.
Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png You’ve been all over.
TZ: I’ve been going east as I’ve left my home state of California.
Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Because of sport?
TZ: Because of coaching. My club coach left the club and went to the college level. So when I went to college he continued coaching.
Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png Did you get a scholarship?
TZ: I was on a full athletic scholarship. I was the first physically disabled athlete to get a full Division One scholarship.
Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png That is so cool.
TZ: I guess they say, they are not as equal, but medals are medals, and whatever your heart is and whatever you think of it, that is what it means.
Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png In Australia, my impression is that they do view them as exactly the same, whereas in America, some people do not even know that the Paralympics are on.
TZ: Yes. And unfortunately it’s a stereotypical society. In the US we don’t typically stereotype Paralympic athletes as the Australians or the Europeans do, and especially if you don’t look disabled. If you put me next to Jessica Long, she’s an incredible athlete but her story is going to be more desirable, because her disability is more noticeable. Don’t do that for me. But it’s to the extent where you are losing the focus of the athletics.
Wikinews waves Left.pngLaura HaleWikinews waves Right.png Is there anything else we should know in terms of the history of the Paralympics?
Wikinews waves Left.pngHawkeye7Wikinews waves Right.png Particularly about yourself.
Wikinews waves Left.pngLaura HaleWikinews waves Right.png Are you a shy and retiring individual?
TZ: I am. And I think that’s part of it. I’m not very good with bragging.
Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png At selling yourself?
TZ: At selling myself. And I feel that my medals and my performance in the water speaks for itself.
Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png You were out there tonight presenting a medal.
TZ: And it was an honour to be on that side of it for these games. In 2008, I was honoured to be part of the Presidential delegation. I am involved with the US Olympic Committee as an athlete adviser on the rules and regulations and the rights of athletes. That’s basically where I want to be right now. I want to be an advocate for athletes.
Wikinews waves Left.pngHawkeye7Wikinews waves Right.png We were at water polo match in Canberra, watching the Australian Olympic water polo team. And Ellie Cole walked in and they announced: “Ladies and gentlemen, this is Ellie Cole!” These Olympians applauded Ellie Cole.
Wikinews waves Left.pngLaura HaleWikinews waves Right.png They do that at the Canberra Capitals games. They introduced Ellie Cole and her dad. It’s a completely different perspective. People outside the United States ask: “Why don’t you acknowledge them? What is wrong with the US?”
Wikinews waves Left.pngHawkeye7Wikinews waves Right.png Every ad break [in Australia] there’s a Paralympian
Wikinews waves Left.pngLaura HaleWikinews waves Right.png Grace Bowman! You haven’t done any commercials have you?
TZ: No to the extent that some athletes do, but for Visa and Coke. For Atlanta we did some commercials for Coke, it’s headquarters is in Atlanta. I’ve done Hartford Insurance, but not globally.
Wikinews waves Left.pngLaura HaleWikinews waves Right.png Thank you.
Wikinews waves Left.pngHawkeye7Wikinews waves Right.png Thank you.



Sources

Wikinews
This article is a featured article. It is considered one of the best works of the Wikinews community. See Wikinews:Featured articles for more information.
Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.


Bookmark-new.svg


This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.

Boccia under way on fourth day of London Paralympics

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

2012 Summer Paralympics

Trafalgar Square, London - London 2012 - countdown clock.jpg

Newest 2012 Paralympic stories

Monday, September 3, 2012

Portugal and Belgium’s boccia players in action
Image: Laura Hale.

Thailand’s boccia players in action
Image: Laura Hale.

Hong Kong and Great Britain’s boccia players in action
Image: Laura Hale.

Portugal and Japan’s boccia players in action
Image: Laura Hale.

China and South Korea’s boccia players in action
Image: Laura Hale.

Brazil and Thailand’s boccia players in action
Image: Laura Hale.

Thailand thinking of their shot
Image: Laura Hale.

Spain, Canada and others watch boccia
Image: Laura Hale.

Ramps are moved in the Spain and Thailand match
Image: Laura Hale.

Boccia is being played
Image: Laura Hale.

Ramps are set up for Belgium and Portugal
Image: Laura Hale.

Thailand versus Spain scoreboard results
Image: Laura Hale.

Brazil and Thailand contemplate shot options
Image: Laura Hale.

London, England — On the fourth day of competition of the London Paralympics, boccia was underway at London’s ExCeL South Arena 1.

The first rounds of the day were pool play, with matches in Mixed Pairs – BC4 between Brazil and Czech Republic, Hong Kong and Portugal, Great Britain and Thailand, and Canada and Slovakia. In the Mixed Pairs – BC3, the first session featured matches between Greece and South Korea, and Canada and Great Britain.

The second session included more Mixed Pairs – BC3 pool play, with matches between Portugal and Belgium, and Thailand and Spain. Four quarter-final events took place in the Mixed Team – BC1-2 event, with South Korea playing China, Thailand playing Brazil, Great Britain playing Hong Kong, and Japan playing Portugal.

Medal round competitions in boccia start tomorrow.



Sources

Wikinews
This article features first-hand journalism by Wikinews members. See the collaboration page for more details.

This text comes from Wikinews. Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 2.5 licence. For a complete list of contributors for this article, visit the corresponding history entry on Wikinews.
Older Posts »

Powered by WordPress