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February 26, 2013

France finishes 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships on top of medal ladder

France finishes 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships on top of medal ladder

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Tuesday, February 26, 2013

On the final day of individual competition at the 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships in La Molina, Spain, concluded today with the Giant Slalom, France pulled ahead of Austria to sit atop of the medal ladder with seven gold medals, two silver medals, and three bronze medals to Austria’s seven gold medals, one silver medal, and three bronze medals. Canada earned the most overall medals at the World Championships with fourteen total medals, two more than France.

France’s medals today included a gold by Marie Bochet in the women’s standing event. Bochet captured all five individual gold medals available in her group at these World Championships. Vincent Gauthier-Manuel also earned a gold for France, in the men’s standing group.

Claudia Loesch earned a gold for Austria in the women’s sitting group. It was Austria’s only medal on the day.

Canada’s medals today included a silver by Viviane Forest and her guide Chloe Lauzon-Gauthier in the women’s visually impaired group, a silver by Mac Marcoux and his guide BJ Marcoux in the men’s visually impaired, a bronze by Chris Williamson and his guide in the same group, a bronze by Kimberly Joines in the women’s sitting group, and a bronze by Alexandra Starker in the women’s standing group.

Spain, who had not earned a medal since the second day of competition, increased their medal count by one when Jon Santacana and his guide Miguel Galindo Garcés earned their third gold of the competition after two competitions in a row where they earned Did Not Finishes (DNF) during their second runs.

The final day of skiing saw 117 skiers start, with only 72 getting ranked at the end. 28 skiers earned DNFs during the first run, and nine earned DNFs during their second runs. Five did not start the first run, and one did not start their second run. Two skiers were disqualified in their second runs.

Rank Country Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Flag of France.png FRA 7 2 3 12
2 Flag of Austria.png AUT 7 1 3 11
3 Flag of Russia.png RUS 4 4 3 11
4 Flag of Japan (geometric).png JPN 3 3 1 7
5 Flag of Spain.svg ESP 3 0 0 3
6 Flag of Germany.svg GER 2 7 2 11
7 Flag of Slovakia.png SVK 2 2 1 5
8 Flag of Canada.png CAN 1 5 8 14
9 Flag of the United States.png USA 1 1 1 3
10 Flag of Switzerland.svg SUI 0 2 4 6
11 Flag of Great Britain with border.png GBR 0 2 3 5
12 Flag of Italy.png ITA 0 1 0 1
13 Flag of New Zealand.png NZL 0 0 1 1

Viviane Forest and Chloe Lauzon-Gauthier of Canada hug following their silver medal run in the Giant Slalom
Image: Raystorm.

Alexandra Frantseva and Pavel Zabotini of Russia hug following their gold medal run in the women’s visually impaired Giant Slalom
Image: Raystorm.

Kelly Gallagher and Charlotte Evans of Great Britain make their way down the course in their second run of their bronze medal winning performance in the Giant Slalom
Image: Raystorm.

Jon Santacana and Miguel Galindo Garcés embrace Chris Williamson and his guide Robin Femy following Santacana’s gold medal winning run
Image: Laura Hale.

Santacana and Galindo at the end of their second run in the Giant Slalom
Image: Laura Hale.

Marie Bochet of France gets a hug following earning her fifth medal of the competition
Image: Laura Hale.

Marie Bochet after crossing the finish line
Image: Laura Hale.

Marie Bochet and German silver medalist Andrea Rothfuss embrace
Image: Laura Hale.



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Team USA finishes IPC Alpine World Championships with only one gold medal

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Tuesday, February 26, 2013

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Image: Laura Hale.



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Japan finishes IPC Alpine World Championships with seven medals

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Tuesday, February 26, 2013

With the individual component of IPC Alpine World Championships finishing earlier today in La Molina, Spain, the Japanese team leaves with seven total medals, three gold, three silver and one bronze.

Akira Kano with his bronze medal in the Super-G
Image: Raystorm.

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France finishes IPC Alpine World Championships on top of the medal ladder

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Tuesday, February 26, 2013

On the final day of individual competition at the 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships in La Molina, Spain, concluded today with the Giant Slalom, France pulled ahead of Austria to sit atop of the medal ladder with seven gold medals, two silver medals, and three bronze medals to Austria’s seven gold medals, one silver medal, and three bronze medals. Canada earned the most overall medals at the World Championships with fourteen total medals, two more than France.

France’s medals today included a gold by Marie Bochet in the women’s standing event. Bochet captured all five individual gold medals available in her group at these World Championships. Vincent Gauthier-Manuel also earned a gold for France, in the men’s standing group.

Claudia Loesch earned a gold for Austria in the women’s sitting group. It was Austria’s only medal on the day.

Canada’s medals today included a silver by Viviane Forest and her guide Chloe Lauzon-Gauthier in the women’s visually impaired group, a silver by Mac Marcoux and his guide BJ Marcoux in the men’s visually impaired, a bronze by Chris Williamson and his guide in the same group, a bronze by Kimberly Joines in the women’s sitting group, and a bronze by Alexandra Starker in the women’s standing group.

Spain, who had not earned a medal since the second day of competition, increased their medal count by one when Jon Santacana and his guide Miguel Galindo Garcés earned their third gold of the competition after two competitions in a row where they earned Did Not Finishes (DNF) during their second runs.

The final day of skiing saw 117 skiers start, with only 72 getting ranked at the end. 28 skiers earned DNFs during the first run, and nine earned DNFs during their second runs. Five did not start the first run, and one did not start their second run. Two skiers were disqualified in their second runs.

Rank Country Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Flag of France.png FRA 7 2 3 12
2 Flag of Austria.png AUT 7 1 3 11
3 Flag of Russia.png RUS 4 4 3 11
4 Flag of Japan (geometric).png JPN 3 3 1 7
5 Flag of Spain.png ESP 3 0 0 3
6 Flag of Germany.svg GER 2 7 2 11
7 Flag of Slovakia.png SVK 2 2 1 5
8 Flag of Canada.png CAN 1 5 8 14
9 Flag of the United States.png USA 1 1 1 3
10 Flag of Switzerland.svg SUI 0 2 4 6
11 Flag of Great Britain with border.png GBR 0 2 3 5
12 Flag of Italy.png ITA 0 1 0 1
13 Flag of New Zealand.png NZL 0 0 1 1

Viviane Forest and Chloe Lauzon-Gauthier of Canada hug following their silver medal run in the Giant Slalom
Image: Raystorm.

Alexandra Frantseva and Pavel Zabotini of Russia hug following their gold medal run in the women’s visually impaired Giant Slalom
Image: Raystorm.

Kelly Gallagher and Charlotte Evans of Great Britain make their way down the course in their second run of their bronze medal winning performance in the Giant Slalom
Image: Raystorm.

Jon Santacana and Miguel Galindo Garcés embrace Chris Williamson and his guide Robin Femy following Santacana’s gold medal winning run
Image: Laura Hale.

Santacana and Galindo at the end of their second run in the Giant Slalom
Image: Laura Hale.

Marie Bochet of France gets a hug following earning her fifth medal of the competition
Image: Laura Hale.

Marie Bochet after crossing the finish line
Image: Laura Hale.

Marie Bochet and German silver medalist Andrea Rothfuss embrace
Image: Laura Hale.



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Austria regains medal leadboard after fourth competition day of 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships

Austria regains medal leadboard after fourth competition day of 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships

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Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Philipp Bonadimann of Austria at the end of his first run in the Super Combined event
Image: Laura Hale.

Yesterday, following the Super Combined event at the 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships, Austria took the lead again in the medal count having earned six total gold medals across four days of competition. France is tied with Austria in the overall medal count.

Austria’s medal tally yesterday included a gold by LW11 classified Claudia Loesch in the women’s sitting event, a gold by LW4 classified Matthias Lanzinger in the men’s standing event, and a bronze by LW11 classified Philipp Bonadimann in the men’s sitting event.

Following her gold medal winning, Loesch told the media she was super happy she won, and she had a really good slalom run. She went on to say she usually finishes in second and this was a surprise for her.

France’s medal count increased with a gold by LW6/8-2 Marie Bochet in the women’s standing, and a bronze by LW4 classified Cedric Amafroi-Broisat in the men’s standing.

Spain’s vision impaired skier Jon Santacana, who won Spain’s only two medals in the competition, failed to finish his second run in the Super Combined. Following the race, he was visibly upset. He had finished the first run in first place by a tenth of a second ahead of eventual gold medalist Chris Williamson and guide Robin Femy of Canada. Williamson hugged silver medalist Miroslav Haraus of Slovakia, and Santacana when Santacana and guide Miguel Galindo Garcés returned to the finishing area after Santacana’s fall. Spain’s other entrant in the men’s visually impaired Super Combined event, Gabriel Gorce and guide Arnau Ferrer, finished three thousandths of a second out of medal contention with a combined run time of 1:47.93. The bronze medalist, Ivan Frantseva and guide German Agranovskii‎ of Russia, had a combined run time of 1:47.90.

At the finish of each competitor’s second run, most are requested to go to doping control to insure they are not taking any banned substance. The 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships are scheduled to continue today.

Rank Country Gold Silver Bronze Total
1 Flag of Austria.png AUT 6 1 3 10
2 Flag of France.png FRA 5 2 3 10
3 Flag of Russia.png RUS 3 3 3 9
4 Flag of Germany.svg GER 2 5 2 9
5 Flag of Slovakia.png SVK 2 2 1 5
5 Flag of Japan (geometric).png JPN 2 2 1 5
7 Flag of Spain.svg ESP 2 0 0 2
8 Flag of Canada.png CAN 1 3 5 9
9 Flag of the United States.png USA 1 1 1 3
10 Flag of Switzerland.svg SUI 0 2 2 4
10 Flag of Great Britain with border.png GBR 0 2 2 4
12 Flag of Italy.png ITA 0 1 0 1
13 Flag of New Zealand.png NZL 0 0 1 1



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Amilton de Cristo

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Please check whether this article is OR before userspaceifying or deleting it. (It is tagged as OR, but I don’t see it.) –Gryllida 08
24, 5 March 2013 (UTC)

Tuesday, February 26, 2013

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a Christian pastor Amilton de cristowas quoted in the Sunday spectacular about the controversy of falling in the Spirit. Wikinews also learned that one of the churches he had preached in videos showing alleged persons falling within the spirit YouTube

“Hang in spirit, the cult that attracts more and more followers in Brazil and the world, draws attention for exposing his followers the rites dangerous and intriguing. Controlled by a religious leader, the faithful remain motionless, fall and struggle, in a trance, on the ground, and often all at once.

In exclusive chat with reporter Heloise Vilela, the Sunday Spectacular TV Record), one of the founders of the movement, Paul Gold, sorry, reveals that the practices run counter to the Holy Scriptures.

– In two years, about two million people worldwide visited the Toronto Airport Church, to receive this spirit, these demonstrations and that “blessing”. TOday I would say that this is something somewhat macabre.

Paul has emerged as the details go. He led the prayers and rituals of ‘bandeau’. It was one of the leading names in the church, but during a service, he realized that there was something wrong in all this. He says that people imitated dogs and behaved like drunkards.

– Today I believe that this spirit is a false spirit, a deceiving spirit and not the spirit of the sacred scriptures

Gold says he was in a trance when a thought came that it was wrong.

– At the same time, my heart was convinced and at the same time I asked the Lord Jesus to forgive me for being so stupid, so ridiculous.

Gold decided to shut down the church and wrote a letter that says “the devil uses the ‘fall in spirit’ to blind people, the move violates the Scriptures.” The pastor ended up getting sick. It was then that he realized how much he had been mistaken.

– The Holy Spirit, the name says, is holy. He will never encourage people to do something that is not sacred. People, humanity made in the image of god, because God depreciate mankind by making people look animals?

At reporter Heloisa Vilela, the founder of the movement ‘bandeau’ sent a message to Braziilians.

– Please pastor, not adopt it. Do not think that is a good thing. This is not of God. This is a scheme of the devil. And that will bring destruction to men, women and children who embrace it.

For the neurologist Marcelo Sogabe, there is a medical explanation for the declines in series.

– This is given the technical name of pareidolia, which for some reason the brain is conditioned to react, as everyone will react. The brain needs to search for images and when the search and view all falling, it also affects the person doing it.

Repentant

In the city of Araraquara (SP), Cecilia Moura, gospel for over thirty years, participated for four years in cults who adopted the “fall spirit, but realized that for the achievements of cults, something strange happened.

– We fall, was laughing, rolling on the floor, but it brought me a challenge in terms of outcome. What it brought to my life? Nothing.

Disillusioned, Cecilia decided it was time to abandon the movement.

– There’s something I have to do and there’s something I have to do for me. And it certainly was not falling on the floor laughing and that my life would change.

Today, she and her husband abhor this practice and says cured of deceptions imposed by preachers.

Clemilda da Conceição also used to hang in the church. She sought comfort after a traumatic separation. She sought comfort in the church, but did not understand and did not like the feeling.

– I could not understand, because what I sought was not falling. I sought the Holy Spirit, I sought changes. I fell, but nothing changed. I did not have the gifts of the spirit that the Bible says that you must have. And realize it was important to set me free.

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[Category:Religion]]

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Wikinews interviews Irene Villa

Wikinews interviews Irene Villa – Wikinews, the free news source

Wikinews interviews Irene Villa

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Tuesday, February 26, 2013

Irene Villa after the interview with the Wikinews reporters.
Image: Raystorm.

Yesterday evening in La Molina, Spain, Wikinews sat down and talked with Irene Villa to discuss para-alpine skiing, disability sport, women’s sport, and her own sporting career. Villa was in town as part of activities taking place around the 2013 IPC Alpine World Championships, where one of her skiing club teammates is competing as a member of the Spanish team. Her high profile in Spain has brought additional interest to para-alpine skiing and disability sport in general.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWikinewsWikinews waves Right.png: Hi we are interviewing Irene Villa, who is a disability skier from Spain and professional author, social figure, journalist, and psychologist. You are most well known for being a terrorist survivor, but you’re here because of the [2013 Alpine Skiing] World Championships.((es))

Irene Villa: I’m here because I love sitting ski, I practice and I compete, but since I got pregnant and my son was born I stopped competing. But before I had my son I competed against the people who will run tomorrow, the Germans who win, and I wanted to be here. I haven’t raced in the World Cup, but I did race in the European Cup. And well, I’m also here to support paralympic sports.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png: In 2009 you said you were trying to make the 2010 Winter Paralympics. After giving birth are you going to continue with the sport and hope to make 2018?((es))

Irene Villa: I would love to. The thing is that you need a certain amount of IPCAS points. I’m now competing, on top of that I have an injury, tomorrow and the next day I will be training, and I don’t know if I’ll have enough time to make it. Sochi [Winter Paralympic Games of 2014] is right around the corner, next year, so it depends on how many point you’ve got. 2018? For sure.((es))

Listen to the interview.
Audio: Laura Hale.

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png: You compete in a lot of national competitions, and with disability sport in general, classification is a big issue. Competing in national competitions, does classification come into play, especially when there is so few women skiers in your group?((es))

Irene Villa: Yes, certainly. You see, I have an advantage because I have buttocks, I have abs. I have an advantage over a teammate who has a spinal injury here [points to the high part of the back] and also competes. So of course classification is very important because we cannot have an advantage. I believe in competing in equal fairness, and disabilities vary so much that you need a good classification. Issues because of classification? Well, I think we are pretty well classified. For example, my fingers [shows hand where she lost three fingers] are not taken into account in classification, there’s always going to be a small detail that they don’t count. This is a disadvantage when holding the outrigger, and yet I’m classified like someone who is missing half a leg, for example. I’m missing both legs and three fingers. But, it’s really complicated to finetune it… Because then we would need to have twenty thousand classifications. This is what we have.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png: Some of the skiers I’ve talked to in the mens’ side, not in Spain, but from other countries, have complained about the quality of womens’ skiing, and that there’s not enough high quality competition. That’s why I was interested in if classification was impacting women’s skiing because there is so few women skiers, that classes seem they’d make it harder to find competitors in classes that are making the sport equitable and fair.((es))

Irene Villa: Of course. In the case of the women, it is really hard to get a woman skiing, to have her compete in sit-ski. In fact, in Spain we exist thanks to Fundación También, which insisted in there being a female category. There was no female category, no women who dared. And we’re the same who started out in 2007. There has been no new blood because women don’t dare, because it is a tough sport, that requires sponsors —that do not exist—, or your own money, and it also demands courage and withstanding bad moments. I’ve suffered cold and injuries, and had some really tough times. You take away the best with you, but it is very hard, and men resist the cold better.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png: Your personal experiences have adequately prepared you to hurl yourself down the mountain at high speed? ((es))

Irene Villa: At the beginning, it was very scary. The first times were very hard: falls, injuries… I even dislocated my vertebra and got a prothesis for the neck because of a hernia, one teammate broke her clavicle, another her femur… It has a lot of risks, but the truth is, speed hooks you! Once you learn to plant the ski pole, angle yourself, learn the position you must use, which is like a motorcycle rider’s, once you see you can run a lot and not fall, speed is addictive and you want to go faster.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png: Most of the ski team looks like they come from the Madrid area? From the Fundación También?((es))

Irene Villa: In my team we are from everywhere in Spain. Even Nathalie Carpanedo is from France.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png: How does a Frenchwoman become a Spanish skier?((es))

Irene Villa: Because she lives in Madrid. She has the Spanish nationality. Then we have another woman from the South of Spain, in Andalusia, from Tarragona in Catalonia, from Galicia… We are from all parts of Spain.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png: So there’s a national ski culture. People think of Spain as a place with beaches and no snow.((es))

Irene Villa: There’s not too much tradition of paralympic skiing, to be true. There’s less. But we do have Sierra Nevada and the Pyrenees.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png: The Paralympics in Spain are supported by the Plan ADO Paralímpico. Do they provide enough support to women and to winter sports in general?((es))

Irene Villa: The people in the national squad, like Úrsula Pueyo, would know that. If Plan ADO helps someone, it’s the people in the national team, those who dedicate their lives to the sport. They offered it to me when I was at my peak, in 2010, when I won my first gold medals and wasn’t yet married. They offered me to move to Baqueira, where Úrsula lives, with Nathalie, and with a Catalan girl too, but I declined, because when you have a life, a daily job, events, conferences, travels…. you can’t leave it all for the sport. But I think the Plan does help the people who dedicate themselves to the sport, like Úrsula.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png: When I’ve read about disability skiing in Spain for women, they talk about you and they talk about Teresa Silva. Is there a way to get more attention for women skiers on that level, outside of using you and Teresa Silva as a vehicle? Not that you are not great for drawing attention! But how do you draw more attention to women’s sports and high quality that women are capable of doing?((es))

Irene Villa: Oh, I would like that more people would join this sport or any other disability sport, that they practised it. And what we do is try to encourage them through the media, interviews, conferences… Teresa is the director of Fundación También, and she has access to talk with many people. As a speaker in motivation conferences and the like, I make people aware of it too. But it is difficult, because people try it out and love it, but will not race. Because racing is very risky and, well, you saw the slopes yesterday, sometimes they are hard, like a wall, and falling can be awful. But when we get the chance, we promote the sport and try to attract people that way, encouraging them to join this adventure that is sport.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png: As an outsider from, not Spain, I know you are a political figure. Has that gotten in the way of your ability to be a sportswoman? ((es))

Irene Villa: No… Besides, that part about me being a political figure… I have nothing to do with politics. I don’t know why people always… Why? Because of what happened to me. I was a kid. A 12 year old has nothing to do with politics. We know too that ETA has attacked people who had nothing to do with politics as well. My mother was a police director. What may have interfered is the fact that since I was a known figure I’ve tried that other people…. Let’s see, for example I started doing sport so other people would know you could do sport. So it is true that the fact of being known has pushed me to do more things that I would’ve probably not have done. Because I wanted to show people that you could ski. And I ended up hooked. I only did it for a tv reportage. “Okay okay, a reportage and let’s have people know that yes, we can”. In fact, my book is titled “Knowing that you can” [Saber que se puede, in Spanish]. Later I got hooked. But the fact of being known motivates you to show other people a path that could be very beneficial to them, and at the end you get addicted to it.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png: When all is said and done, what do you kind of want your legacy to be? Do you want to be known as Irene Villa, disability sport advocate figure? Do you want to be known like Jon Santacana, or do you want to be known as somebody who has pushed the boundaries in other areas? ((es))

Irene Villa: As something more. I’d like my testimony to go beyond sport, which is what I try to do around the world, besides telling people you can do it. It’s about the capacity of a person to make herself, to be happy, to overcome resentment, to love herself, and to love others. I think that is the most important thing. And that’s the basis. I think sport is something that completes your life, mentally and physically. It’s very important. But my message is forgiveness, happiness and hope.((es))

Wikinews waves Left.pngWNWikinews waves Right.png: Thank you very much!((es))



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Scottish Cardinal Keith O\’Brien resigns amid sex abuse allegations

Scottish Cardinal Keith O’Brien resigns amid sex abuse allegations

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Tuesday, February 26, 2013

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Keith O’Brien in 2007.
Image: Gavin Scott.

Following accusations that he engaged in “inappropriate acts” with three priests and a former priest, Cardinal Keith O’Brien resigned yesterday from his post as Archbishop of St Andrews and Edinburgh. O’Brien had been expected to take part in the papal conclave to decide the next Pope and to retire shortly thereafter.

O’Brien had tendered a resignation to the Pope nunc pro tunc (now for later) on November 13. He stated yesterday that it had taken effect: “The Holy Father has now decided that my resignation will take effect today, 25 February 2013, and that he will appoint an apostolic administrator to govern the archdiocese in my place until my successor as archbishop is appointed.”

The sexual abuse allegations were published in The Observer and stem from incidents alleged to have happened as long as three decades ago. The former priest alleges O’Brien approached him inappropriately when he was a seminarian at St Andrew’s College in Drygrange in 1980. The former priest claims his resignation from the priesthood was the result of O’Brien’s elevation to bishop: “I knew then he would always have power over me. It was assumed I left the priesthood to get married. I did not. I left to preserve my integrity.”

The three priests allege they were also the subject of unwanted sexual advances from O’Brien. The four complained to Antonio Mennini, the Vatican’s ambassador to Britain. After the story was made public on Sunday, the Vatican confirmed Pope Benedict had been made aware of the complaints.

O’Brien disputes the allegations. Following the publication of the allegations, he chose not to preside over Mass on Sunday. The auxiliary bishop in the Archdiocese of St Andrews and Edinburgh, Bishop Stephen Robson, gave a statement: “A number of allegations of inappropriate behaviour have been made against the cardinal. The cardinal has sought legal advice and it would be inappropriate to comment at this time. There will be further statements in due course. As always in times of need such as this we cannot but be saddened by the events of the last 24 hours. It is to the Lord that we turn now in times of need.”

The cardinal had been outspoken in his condemnation of proposals to legalise same-sex marriage, calling it a “grotesque subversion of a universally accepted human right”, and saying gay relationships are “harmful to the physical, mental and spiritual wellbeing of those involved”. Last year, the gay rights charity Stonewall awarded O’Brien the title of “bigot of the year”.

The gay rights campaigner Peter Tatchell described O’Brien as “hypocritical”: “He appears to have preached one thing in public while doing something different in private. Several other prominent opponents of equal marriage are guilty of double standards and vulnerable to similar exposure. They include anti-gay clergy and politicians. It is estimated that around 40% of Catholic priests in Britain are gay, which makes the church’s opposition to gay equality so two-faced and absurd.”

O’Brien has questioned whether the continued requirement that priests be celibate and unmarried should continue. In an interview with BBC Scotland, he said: “There was a time when priests got married, and of course we know at the present time in some branches of the church — in some branches of the Catholic church — priests can get married, so that is obviously not of divine of origin and it could get discussed again.”



Sources

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