Debris narrowly misses International Space Station

From Wikinews, the free news source you can write!
Jump to: navigation, search

Wednesday, June 29, 2011

Space
Related stories
  • 30 January 2015: Scientists find ancient solar system in Milky Way galaxy
  • 11 January 2015: SpaceX launches fifth resupply rocket to International Space Station
  • 10 January 2015: Researchers say light signal from space suggests merging black holes
  • 8 December 2014: Orion Spacecraft accomplishes first spaceflight test
  • 13 November 2014: Philae space probe lands on comet

Scorpius-Centaurus Associazion
More information on Space:
  • Outer space
  • Spaceflight
  • Space and survival
  • Space exploration
  • Space portal

Space debris passed within a short distance of the International Space Station (ISS) Tuesday, forcing the crew to enter their escape capsules to be ready to depart in case of a collision. The debris ultimately missed the orbital outpost and passed within 260 meters (853 ft) of the station at 12:08 UTC (8:08 EDT).

International Space Station (ISS)
Image: NASA.

Approximately half an hour after the closest approach of the debris, the crew were given the all-clear to reenter the space station from their escape capsules.

Under normal circumstances and had mission controllers known about the collision threat sooner, the crew would have used the station’s thrusters to maneuver out of the path of the oncoming debris.

The size of the debris that threatened the station and its crew in this instance was not immediately known; however, even small fragments can become a major concern due to their high speed.

Had the debris struck the ISS, the crew would have sealed their Soyuz spacecraft and departed the station.

There are six people aboard the ISS and two Soyuz spacecrafts docked to the station. Each Soyuz contains accommodations for three people.

This is not the first time that debris threatened the ISS and its crew. A similar incident occurred in March 2009. Estimations show that there are more than 300,000 pieces of debris in Low-Earth orbit over 10 centimeters (4 in) in length, which travel several thousands of kilometers per hour.



Sources

Bookmark-new.svg