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February 16, 2009

Wikipedia: Eurovision Song Contest 2009

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Eurovision Song Contest 2009
Semi-final 1 12 May 2009
Semi-final 2 14 May 2009
Final 16 May 2009
Presenter(s) TBD
Host broadcaster Flag of Russia Channel One
Venue Olympic Indoor Arena, Moscow, Russia
Number of entries 43
Returning countries  Slovakia
Withdrawing countries  San Marino
Eurovision Song Contest
◄2008        2010►

The Eurovision Song Contest 2009 will be the 54th Eurovision Song Contest, scheduled to take place between 12 and 16 May 2009 at the Olympic Indoor Arena in Moscow, Russia. Changes in the voting procedure will occur with the re-introduction of a national jury alongside televoting while the format of the semi-finals will remain the same. Forty-three countries have confirmed their participation in the contest. Slovakia has announced it will return to the contest, while San Marino have withdrawn due to financial issues. Latvia and Georgia originally announced their intention to withdraw, but it was later stated by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) that both countries would indeed participate.[1]

Contents

Venue

Moscow’s Olympic Indoor Arena, the 2009 venue.

The contest will be held in Russia following its victory in the 2008 contest in Belgrade, Serbia with Dima Bilan’s “Believe”.[2] Despite the unwillingness of the Mayor of Moscow to hold the contest in the city,[3] Vladimir Putin, Prime Minister of Russia, eventually stated that the contest will be held in Moscow and it was proposed by the host broadcaster, Channel One, that the contest be held in the Olympic Indoor Arena within Moscow.[4][5] This proposal was evaluated by the European Broadcasting Union (EBU) and confirmed on 13 September 2008.[4] The Director-General of the venue, Vladimir Churilin refuted rumours of emergency reconstruction of the building, saying: “It will not be required for the Eurovision Song Contest. We now can take up to 25 thousand spectators.”[6]

Visual design

At the allocation draw, host broadcaster Channel One presented the sub-logo and theme for the 2009 contest.[7] The sub-logo is based upon a “Fantasy Bird”, which can be used with many colours. Like in previous years, the sub-logo will be presented along side of the generic logo.[7] This is the first year that there will be no slogan for the contest since 2001.

Format

The contest final is scheduled to take place on 16 May 2009 at the Olympic Indoor Arena in Moscow, Russia with two semi-finals preceding it on 12 and 14 May.[8][2][4] Thirty-eight countries are confirmed to participate in one of the two semi-finals of the contest, with the “Big Four” countries (France, Germany, Spain and the United Kingdom) and the host pre-qualified for the final.[1] In addition to those pre-qualified, the final will also include the ten selected countries from each semi-final, making a total of twenty-five participants.

A discussion on changes to the format of the 2009 Eurovision Song Contest had taken place at a EBU meeting in Athens, Greece in June 2008 where a proposal was made that could have resulted in the “Big Four” losing their automatic place in the final of the contest.[9] However, it has been confirmed that the “Big Four” countries will continue to automatically qualify for the final at the 2009 contest.[10]

Voting

In response to some broadcasters’ continued complaints about politically charged, neighbourly and diaspora voting, the EBU evaluated the voting procedure used in the contest, with the possibility of a change in the voting system for 2009. Contest organisers sent a questionnaire regarding the voting system to participating broadcasters, and a reference group incorporated the responses into their suggestions for next year’s format.[11] Telewizja Polska (TVP), the Polish broadcaster, suggested that an international jury similar to the one used in the 2008 Eurovision Dance Contest be introduced in the Eurovision Song Contest to lessen the impact of neighbourly voting and place more emphasis on the artistic value of the song.[12] A jury would lead to less political and diaspora voting as the jury members, mandated to be music industry experts, would also have a say in addition to “random members of the public”.[13]

It has since been confirmed that for the contest final, each country’s votes will be decided by a combination of 50% televoting results and 50% national jury.[14] The method of selecting the semi-final qualifiers will remain the same, however, with nine countries in each semi-final which qualified based on the televoting results, and a tenth coming from the juries.[15][16] Details on the jury method will be released after another Reference Group meeting in December.[17] National juries were originally phased out of the contest beginning in 1997, with televoting becoming mandatory for nearly all participants since 2003.

Edgar Böhm, director of entertainment for Austria’s public broadcaster Österreichischer Rundfunk (ORF), has stated that the 2008 format with two semi-finals “still incorporates a mix of countries who will be politically favoured in the voting process,” and “that, unless a clear guideline as to how the semifinals are organised is made by the EBU, Austria will not be taking part in Moscow 2009.”[18][19] Despite the inclusion of jury voting in the final, Austria will not return to the contest in 2009, but will broadcast the final on ORF as it did in 2008.[20]

Pot allocations

On Friday 30 January 2009, the draw to decide which countries will appear in either the first or second semi-final took place. Going on last year’s system of events, all countries were separated into six individual pots based on voting patterns in previous contests. The draw has been created to ensure countries who are most likely to give each other points in the competition will not participate in the same semi-final. Out of these six pots it was known which countries would participate in the first semi-final and the second semi-final respectively.[21] It was also determined that Germany, Spain, and the United Kingdom would vote in the first semi-final, while France and Russia would vote in the second semi-final.[22][23] The draw for the running order of the semi-finals, finals, and the order of voting, will occur in March 2009.[1]

Presenter announcing the results of the semi-final allocation draw.

Pot 1 Pot 2 Pot 3
  •  Albania
  •  Bosnia and Herzegovina
  •  Croatia
  • Flag of the Republic of Macedonia FYR Macedonia
  •  Montenegro
  •  Serbia
  •  Slovenia
  •  Denmark
  •  Estonia
  •  Finland
  •  Iceland
  •  Norway
  •  Sweden
  •  Armenia
  •  Azerbaijan
  •  Belarus
  •  Georgia
  •  Israel
  •  Moldova
  •  Ukraine
Pot 4 Pot 5 Pot 6
  •  Belgium
  •  Bulgaria
  •  Cyprus
  •  Greece
  •  Netherlands
  •  Turkey
  •  Andorra
  •  Ireland
  •  Latvia
  •  Lithuania
  •  Portugal
  •  Romania
  •  Czech Republic
  •  Hungary
  •  Malta
  •  Poland
  •  Slovakia
  •  Switzerland

Individual entries

Participating countries

     Countries participating in the final.      Countries participating in one of the two semi-finals.      Countries who have participated in the past but will not this year.

     Countries in the first semi-final.      Countries in the second semi-final.      Countries voting in the first semi-final.      Countries voting in the second semi-final.

Following the release of the final participants list by the EBU, forty-three countries have confirmed their participation in the 2009 contest, including Slovakia, which will return to the contest after 11 years.[24][1] Georgia had originally announced that its withdrawal from the contest due to the 2008 South Ossetia war in protest of the foreign policies of Russia,[25][26][27] but has since decided to return to the contest, inspired by their win at the Junior Eurovision Song Contest 2008, as well as Russia’s 12 points to them in the same contest.[28][29] Svante Stockselius, the EBU scrutineer for Eurovision, said that a record number of participants would be competing in Moscow, meaning that 44 or more countries would compete, however this now seems unlikely.[30]

Rumours arose surrounding the participation and return of San Marino and Monaco. Télé Monte Carlo (TMC), the Monegasque broadcaster, confirmed that there were talks between them and the EBU over a Monegasque return to the 2009 contest.[31] At the same time, rumours spread that San Marino’s broadcaster, Radiotelevisione della Repubblica di San Marino (SMRTV), would withdraw from the contest due to poor placing at the 2008 contest.[32] In the end, after originally confirming their intent to participate in Moscow, SMRTV were forced to withdraw from the event due to financial difficulties that prevent a second entry.[33][34]

The Latvian broadcaster, Latvijas Televīzija (LTV), had reportedly withdrawn from the 2009 contest on 17 December 2008, three days after the final participation deadline. This came about due to budget cuts of over 2 million Lats from the LTV budget, hindering their ability to pay the participation fee.[35] LTV has confirmed that they have informed the EBU of their intent to withdraw, based solely on financial difficulties. LTV were in discussions with the EBU in a bid to find a solution that will keep the country at the Eurovision Song Contest.[36][37] On 20 December 2008, LTV announced that they would be withdrawing from the contest, and that both the EBU and Channel One have agreed not to force a financial penalty on the late withdrawal of the broadcaster from the 2009 contest. LTV also announced their intent to be at the 2010 contest.[38][39] However, on 12 January 2009 it was confirmed that Latvia would be participating in the 2009 contest.[1]

Semi-final countries

Thirty-eight countries are confirmed to participate in one of the two semi-finals of the contest.[1] The draw for the semi-finals took place on 30 January 2009.[22][23]

Semi-final 1

The countries in the list below are arranged alphabetically.

Country Language Artist Song English translation
 Andorra Catalan, English[40][41] Susanne Georgi[42][43] “La teva decisió”[42][43] Your decision
 Armenia Armenian, English[44][45] Inga & Anush Arshakyan[44][45][46] “Nor Par” (Նոր Պար)[44][45] New Dance
 Belarus English[47] Petr Elfimov[47][48] “Eyes That Never Lie”[47][48]
 Belgium
 Bosnia and Herzegovina Bosnian[49] Regina[50][51] “Bistra voda”[50][51] Clear water
 Bulgaria
 Czech Republic Gipsy.cz[52][53]
 Finland English[54][55][56] Waldo’s People[54][55][56] “Lose Control”[54][55][56]
 Georgia
 Iceland English[57][58][59] Jóhanna Guðrún Jónsdóttir[57][58][59] “Is It True?”[57][58][59]
 Israel English, Hebrew, Arabic[60] Noa and Mira Awad[61][62]
Flag of the Republic of Macedonia FYR Macedonia
 Malta English[63][64] Chiara[63][64] “What If We”[63][64]
 Montenegro English[65][66][67] Andrea Demirović[65][66][67] “Just Get Out of My Life”[65][66][67]
 Portugal Portuguese[68]
 Romania English[69][70] Elena Gheorghe[69][70] “The Balkan Girls”[69][70]
 Sweden
 Switzerland English Lovebugs[71][72]
 Turkey English[73] Hadise[74][75][76] “Düm Tek Tek”[77][78] Boom Bang Bang[a]

Semi-final 2

The countries in the list below are arranged alphabetically.

Country Language Artist Song English translation
 Albania English[79] Kejsi Tola[80][81] “Më merr në ëndërr”[80][81] Take me into your dreams
 Azerbaijan English[82] AySel & Arash[83] “Always”[84][85]
 Croatia
 Cyprus English[86] Christina Metaxa[87][88] “Firefly”[87][88]
 Denmark English[89][90] Niels Brinck[89][90] “Believe Again”[89][90]
 Estonia
 Greece English[91] Sakis Rouvas[92][93]
 Hungary
 Ireland
 Latvia
 Lithuania English[94][95][96] Sasha Son[94][95][96] “Love”[94][95][96]
 Moldova Romanian[97][98][99] Nelly Ciobanu[97][98][99] “Hora din Moldova”[97][98][99] Dance of Moldova
 Netherlands English[100][101][102] De Toppers[103][104] “Shine”[100][101][102]
 Norway
 Poland English[105][106][107] Lidia Kopania[105][106][107] “I Don’t Wanna Leave”[105][106][107]
 Serbia Serbian[108][109][110]
 Slovakia Slovak[111]
 Slovenia English[112][113][114] Quartissimo feat. Martina Majerle[112][113][114] “Love Symphony”[112][113][114]
 Ukraine

Final

The “Big Four” and the host country are qualified directly to the final of the contest, and will not participate in any of the semi-finals.[1] The five finalists listed below will be joined by ten entries from each of the two semi-finals; twenty-five entries in total will compete in the final.

Country Language Artist Song English translation
 France French[115] Patricia Kaas[116][117] “Et s’il fallait le faire”[118][119] And if it had to be done
 Germany English[120] Alex Swings Oscar Sings[121] “Miss Kiss Kiss Bang”[121]
 Russia
 Spain
 United Kingdom English[122] Jade Ewen[123][124][125] “My Time”[126]

Notes

  • a. ^ “Düm Tek Tek” is the sound that a drum makes, thus there is no direct or official translation for it. “Boom Bang Bang” is simply the English equivalent.[127]

References

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External links

  • Eurovision Song Contest Official Site
  • Eurovision Song Contest
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